One hour run

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For hour record for bicycles, see Hour record.

The one hour run is an athletics event in which competitors try to cover as much distance as possible within one hour. While officially recognized by the International Association of Athletics Federations as a track event, it is rarely contested apart from occasional world record attempts.

The event has a long history, with first recorded races dating back to the late 17th century.[1] The first athlete to run more than 20 kilometers in one hour was Emil Zátopek, in September 1951. Zátopek also set the 20,000 meters world record in the same race, and since that time most men's 20,000 m world records were set en route to one hour world records.

The men's world record is 21,285 m, set by Haile Gebrselassie on 27 June 2007, while the women's world record is 18,517 m, set by Dire Tune on 12 June 2008.

Men's world record progression[edit]

Distance Athlete Country Venue Date
18,742 m Alfred Shrubb  Great Britain Glasgow 1904-11-05
19,021 m Jean Bouin  France Stockholm 1913-07-06
19,210 m Paavo Nurmi  Finland Berlin 1928-10-07
19,339 m Viljo Heino  Finland Turku 1945-09-30
19,558 m+ Emil Zátopek  Czechoslovakia Prague 1951-09-15
20,052 m Emil Zátopek  Czechoslovakia Stará Boleslav 1951-09-29
20,190 m Bill Baillie  New Zealand Auckland 1963-08-24
20,232 m Ron Clarke  Australia Geelong 1965-10-27
20,664 m Gaston Roelants  Belgium Leuven 1966-10-28
20,784 m Gaston Roelants  Belgium Brussels 1972-09-20
20,907 m Jos Hermens  Netherlands Papendal 1975-09-28
20,944 m Jos Hermens  Netherlands Papendal 1976-05-01
21,101 m Arturo Barrios  Mexico La Flèche 1991-03-30
21,285 m Haile Gebrselassie  Ethiopia Ostrava 2007-06-27

[2]

Women's world record progression[edit]

Distance Athlete Country Venue Date
18,084 m Silvana Cruciata  Italy Rome 1981-05-02
18,340 m Tegla Loroupe  Kenya Borgholzhausen 1998-08-07
18,517 m Dire Tune  Ethiopia Ostrava 2008-06-12

[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Milroy, Andy (2005). "History of the Hour Run". Retrieved 2008-06-13. 
  2. ^ a b "13th IAAF World Championships In Athletics: IAAF Statistics Handbook. Daegu 2011. (Part 5 of 5)" (pdf). Monte Carlo: IAAF Media & Public Relations Department. 2011. pp. 601, 697. Retrieved 2013-03-12.