Ones (Selena album)

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Ones
Greatest hits album by Selena
Released October 1, 2002
Recorded 1990–1995
Genre Latin pop
Length 74:01
Label EMI Latin
Producer A.B. Quintanilla III, Kike Santander, José Luis Arroyave, Jorge Alberto Pino, Sergio Minski, Guillermo J. Page, Andrés Felipe Silva
Selena chronology
Live! The Last Concert
(2001)
Ones
(2002)
Greatest Hits
(2003)
Singles from Ones
  1. "Con Tanto Amor Medley"
    Released: 2002

Ones (Spanish: Unos in Spanish-speaking countries) is the twelfth compilation album by American singer Selena, released in the United States on October 1, 2002 by EMI Latin. It was released on November 11, 2002 in Spanish-speaking countries, while the limited edition included a bonus DVD of her music videos. In an interview with Julie Chen, Selena's widower Chris Pérez explained that the recording was released building on the popularity of the biographical film Selena. Selena's father Abraham Quintanilla, Jr. and sister Suzette Quintanilla told Chen that the album was aimed at Selena's new generation of fans. Ones was released as part of the Selena: 20 Years of Music collection—a nine-disc set of her studio, live, soundtrack and compilation albums. The album features six number one singles namely, "Amor Prohibido", "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", "No Me Queda Mas", "Fotos y Recuerdos" and her duets with Alvaro Torres on "Buenos Amigos" and Barrio Boyzz on "Donde Quiera Que Estes".

Selena's brother, A.B. Quintanilla III, remixed three of her singles ("Amor Prohibido", "Como La Flor" and "Si Una Vez") into a medley mash-up entitled "Con Tanto Amor Medley". The track was released as a promotional single to radio stations, and received a mixed response from music critics. The album also received a mixed reception, with Jon O'Brien of AllMusic noting that the record label ignored Selena's self-titled debut album from the track listing on Ones. The recording was nominated for "Latin Greatest Hits Album of the Year" at the 2003 Billboard Latin Music Awards. Ones peaked at number four on the US Billboard Top Latin Albums and Latin Pop Albums charts; it peaked at number 159 on the Billboard 200 chart and was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), denoting shipments of 500,000 copies in the United States. Ones was the 13th Top Latin Album of 2002, the 9th Top Latin Pop Album that year and ranked number 88 on the Top Latin Album of the 2000s list.

Background and release[edit]

Selena's family was interviewed by Julie Chen of The Early Show about Ones. Chen asked Selena's father and manager, Abraham Quintanilla, Jr., about his intention to re-release Selena's songs on Ones. Quintanilla told Chen that because of the success of the 1997 biopic about Selena's life, many new fans know who she was. Chris Pérez, her widower, told Chen that Ones was released for Selena's new fans; building on the popularity of the 1997 biographical film, explaining that the family used the DVD to showcase Selena for those who never saw her perform live.[1][2]

The recording was released as part of the Selena: 20 Years of Music collection, a nine-CD retrospective of Selena's musical career.[2][3] The other eight CDs were re-releases of her studio albums: Selena (1989), Ven Conmigo (1990), Entre a Mi Mundo (1992), Amor Prohibido (1994), Dreaming of You (1995) and the compilation albums Mis Primeros Exitos (1990), Live! (1993) and Live! The Last Concert (2001).[2] Ones was released on October 1, 2002 by EMI Latin, and included audio statements by her family, friends and members of Selena y Los Dinos.[4] On November 11, 2002, Unos was released in Spanish-speaking countries with the same track listing as the American edition.[5]

Songs[edit]

"Con Tanto Amor Medley" is a medley mashup of "Amor Prohibido", "Si Una Vez" and "Como La Flor". The recording features acoustic guitar and strings, as noted by music critics.

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The first of Selena's number ones on the album was "Buenos Amigos",[6] a duet with Salvadoran singer Álvaro Torres which enabled her to tour in Torres' country and throughout Latin America.[7] "Baila Esta Cumbia" and "No Quiero Saber" are from Ven Conmigo (1990); the latter track peaked at number six on the US Billboard Hot Latin Tracks chart.[6] "Como La Flor", Selena's signature song, and "La Carcacha" are both originally on 1992's Entre a Mi Mundo. "Como La Flor" launched her on the Latin music scene, according to critics.[8][9] The song was acclaimed,[10][11][12] and was credited as Selena's first number-one single[13][14] despite Billboard '​s official record of the single peaking at number six.[6] "No Debes Jugar", the lead single from 1993's Live!, and "La Llamada" made the album cut. Sally Jacobs of the Boston Globe called "No Debes Jugar" one of "her cumbia signature songs" and "most popular cumbia song[s]".[15] Four of the six number ones on the album are singles from Selena's last studio album, Amor Prohibido (1994). The title track sold 400,000 copies in the United States[16] and was number one on the Hot Latin Tracks chart for nine consecutive weeks,[17] one week short of the record for most weeks at number one on the Hot Latin Songs chart.[18] "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom", the second single off of Amor Prohibido, spent five consecutive weeks at the top of the Hot Latin Tracks chart.[19] The third single from Amor Prohibido to be featured on the album, "No Me Queda Mas", peaked at number one for seven weeks.[20] Following Selena's death in 1995, the song spent another eleven weeks in the top ten, twenty-six weeks overall on the Hot Latin Tracks chart.[21]

"Si Una Vez" peaked at number four on the Regional Mexican Songs chart, while "El Chico del Apartamento 512" failed to chart.[6] Her posthumous number-one single "Fotos y Recuerdos" spent seven consecutive weeks atop the Hot Latin Tracks chart.[22] "Techno Cumbia" peaked at number four on Billboard '​s Latin charts.[6] "Donde Quiera Que Estes", a duet with the Barrio Boyzz, is Selena's second number-one duet.[6] "I Could Fall in Love" and "Dreaming of You" are the only English-language tracks on Ones, and are her most recognizable recordings to American music fans.[23] Both tracks were taken from her crossover attempt, Dreaming of You (1995), which was released posthumously. The only other track from that album, "Tú Sólo Tú", also appears on Ones, Selena's sixth number-one single on the album.[6] "Siempre Hace Frio" was originally released on Siempre Selena (1996), her first remix album. A.B. Quintanilla III and Pete Astudillo composed "Con Tanto Amor Medley", a medley mash-up of "Amor Prohibido", "Si Una Vez" and "Como La Flor". The track was produced by Kike Santander and Jose Luis Arroyae.[3] Tatiana Morales of CBS called it a "beautiful ballad",[2] but John Lannert had the impression that the medley was composed to "fit [in] various Latin radio formats." He noted that the recording had a pop twist with acoustic guitar and "discreet strings", calling it "tasteful bolero-like percussion". Because of the mariachi trumpets used in the "Como La Flor" part of the medley, Lannert thought the track was aimed at regional Mexican radio stations. He was disappointed by the dissolution of the "saucy cumbia beats" that "originally took these songs to the top of the charts", but called "Con Tanto Amor Medley" "[a] rare medley that achieves a seamless transition from track to track" and "manages to sound cohesive, generic arrangements notwithstanding". Lannert ended his review by calling the track "an appropriate balance for an homage."[3]

Reception and chart performance[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic[6] mixed
San Antonio Express News[24] favorable

Ramiro Burr of the San Antonio Express News compared Ones to the greatest hit collections of music legends such as Buddy Holly, Janis Joplin and Jimi Hendrix.[24] Jon O'Brien of AllMusic wrote that Ones ignores Selena's self-titled EMI debut effort, focusing on her career between 1990 and 1995.[6] Ones was nominated for Latin Greatest Hits Album of the Year at the 2003 Billboard Latin Music Awards.[25] It debuted (and peaked) at number four on the US Billboard Top Latin Albums and Latin Pop Albums chart, achieving a Hot Shot Debut on October 19, 2002.[26] The album debuted at number 162 on the Billboard 200 chart.[27] It peaked two weeks later at number 159 the week of November 9, 2002.[28] Ones was certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) in February 2003, signifying 100,000 units shipped in the United States.[29] The recording became the 13th Top Latin Album of 2002 and the ninth Top Latin Pop Album of that year,[30][31] ranking number 88 on the Top Latin Album of the 2000s chart.[32]

Ones reentered the Top Latin Albums chart the week of February 7, 2004 at number 74 before slipping off and reentering the chart the week of March 13 at number 65.[33][34] It placed number 62 the week of April 1, reaching sales of 400,000 copies.[35] After 77 weeks of release, Ones was in 70th position on the Top Latin Albums chart the week of April 10, 2004.[36] The following week (April 17) it rose to number 11, achieving "greatest gainer" status from its previous position.[37] Ones slipped off the chart the week of May 29 from number 66.[38] The 14th anniversary of Selena's death sparked a 51-percent increase in sales for Ones, which rose to number four on the Top Latin Albums chart (up 61 percent from its previous position).[39] In February 2010 the RIAA certified the album gold, signifying shipments of 500,000 copies in the United States.[40]

Track listing[edit]

Disc one
No. Title Writer(s) Length
1. "No Quiero Saber"   A.B. Quintanilla III, Pete Astudillo 2:55
2. "Baila Esta Cumbia"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 2:57
3. "Como La Flor"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 3:04
4. "La Carcacha"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 4:10
5. "Buenos Amigos" (featuring Álvaro Torres) Álvaro Torres 4:46
6. "No Debes Jugar"   Quintanilla III, Ricky Vela 2:50
7. "La Llamada"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 3:12
8. "Amor Prohibido"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 2:49
9. "No Me Queda Más"   Vela 3:19
10. "Fotos y Recuerdos"   Chrissie Hynde, Vela 2:35
11. "El Chico Del Apartamento 512"   Quintanilla III, Vela 3:28
12. "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom"   Selena Quintanilla, Astudillo 3:29
13. "Techno Cumbia"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 3:46
14. "Si Una Vez"   Quintanilla III, Astudillo 2:45
15. "Donde Quiera Que Estés" (featuring the Barrio Boyzz) K. C. Porter, Miguel Flores 4:28
16. "Tú Sólo Tú"   Felipe Valdés Leal 3:14
17. "Siempre Hace Frio"   Cuco Sánchez 3:15
18. "I Could Fall in Love"   Keith Thomas 4:38
19. "Dreaming of You"   Franne Golde, Tom Snow 5:13
20. "Con Tanto Amor Medley" (previously unreleased) Quintanilla III, Astudillo 7:06

Album credits[edit]

Credits are taken from the album's liner notes.[4]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chen, Julie (17 October 2002). "The Early Show". 5 minutes in. CBS.
  2. ^ a b c d Morales, Tatiana. "Fans, Family Remember Selena". CBS. CBS Interactive Inc. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c Lannert, John (19 October 2002). "Spanish Notas". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 42. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Ones (Compact disc). Selena. EMI Latin. 2002. 724358022100. 
  5. ^ Unos (Compact disc). Selena. EMI Mexico. 2002. 72435215100. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Selena > Awards > Chart history". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  7. ^ Miniucchi, Cecilia (director) (1997). Selena Remembered (Documentary). Corpus Christi, Texas; Lake Jackson, Texas: EMI Latin. Event occurs at 60. ISBN 978-613-8-55503-2. 724354452895. 
  8. ^ Parédez, Deborah (2009). Selenidad: Selena, Latinos, and the performance of memory. Duke University Press. p. 156. ISBN 0-8223-4502-1. 
  9. ^ David Arreola, Daniel (2002). Tejano South Texas: a Mexican American cultural province. University of Texas Press. p. 229. 
  10. ^ Tarradell, Mario (16 March 1997). "Selena's Power: Culture Fusion". The Dallas Morning News (A. H. Belo Corporation). Retrieved 18 November 2011.  (subscription required)
  11. ^ Ragland, Kathy (24 March 1996). "With Respect". Austin American-Statesman (Cox Enterprises). Retrieved 18 November 2011.  (subscription required)
  12. ^ Malone, Bill C.; Stricklin, David (2003). Southern music/American music (Rev. ed. ed.). Lexington, Ky.: University Press of Kentucky. ISBN 0-8131-9055-X. 
  13. ^ Pérez, Daniel Enrique (2009). Rethinking Chicana/o and Latina/o popular culture (1st ed. ed.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 978-0-230-61606-6. 
  14. ^ Garcia, Alma M. (2002). The Mexican Americans. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press. ISBN 978-0-313-31499-5. 
  15. ^ Jacobs, Sally (19 October 1995). "The canonization of Selena The slain Tejano singer looms larger than life as her alleged killer stands trial". Boston Globe (The New York Times Company). Retrieved 21 June 2012. 
  16. ^ Gwynne, S.C (1995). "Selena The Tex-Mex Queen". Time (Time Inc.) 145 (9). Retrieved November 23, 2011. 
  17. ^ Harrington, Richard (April 19, 1995). "In the Aftermath of Tragedy". The Washington Post (The Washington Post Company). Retrieved November 24, 2011.  (subscription required)
  18. ^ Maciel, David (2000). Chicano Renaissance: Contemporary Cultural Trends. University of Arizona Press. p. 45. ISBN 0-8165-2021-6. Retrieved 6 June 2012. 
  19. ^ "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom peaked #1 on Latin Songs". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved April 13, 2011. 
  20. ^ "No Me Queda Más > Chart archives > Billboard". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 21 December 2011. 
  21. ^ Bronson, Fred (15 April 1995). "Selena's Tragedy Echoed On Charts". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (15): 96. Retrieved 21 December 2011. 
  22. ^ Burr, Ramiro (17 June 1995). "Artists & Music". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 107 (24): 94. Retrieved 26 December 2011. 
  23. ^ Jusino, Teresa (24 September 2010). ""La Leyenda" Lives On: An Interview with Selena's Sister". PopMatters. Retrieved 24 September 2010. 
  24. ^ a b Burr, Ramiro (31 March 2005). "Selena Library". San Antonio Express-News (Hearst Corporation). Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  25. ^ "Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalist". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (8). 22 February 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  26. ^ a b c "Top Latin Albums > 19 October 2002". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 114 (42). 19 October 2002. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  27. ^ "Top Latin Albums > 26 October 2002". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 114 (43). 26 October 2002. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  28. ^ a b "Top Latin Albums > 9 November 2002". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 114 (45). 9 November 2002. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  29. ^ "RIAA Certifications Update". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (8). 22 February 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  30. ^ a b c d "Rapping Up the Charts". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (25). 21 June 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  31. ^ a b "Chart Recaps". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (34). 23 August 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  32. ^ a b Benavides, Yvette (25 October 2009). "Author to discuss Selena's influence". San Antonio Express-News (Hearst Corporation). Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  33. ^ "Top Latin Albums > 7 February 2004". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 116 (6). 7 February 2004. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  34. ^ "Top Latin Albums > 13 March 2004". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 116 (11). 13 March 2004. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  35. ^ Burr, Ramiro (1 April 2004). "Selena's band plans 10-year reunion Los Dinos are to lead the bill at a televised concert in 2005". San Antonio-Express News (Hearst Corporation). Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  36. ^ Beshur, Alison (31 March 2004). "Selena nine years after death Ones CD sells 400,000, new album hits stores". Corpus Christi Caller-Times (The E.W. Scripps Company). Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  37. ^ a b "Top Latin Albums > 17 April 2004". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 116 (16). 17 April 2004. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  38. ^ "Chart Tastemakers". Billboard 116 (22). 29 May 2004. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  39. ^ a b "Chart Tastemakers". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 121 (15). 18 April 2009. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  40. ^ "American certifications – Selena – Ones". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  41. ^ "Top Latin Albums > 18 January 2003". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (3). 18 January 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  42. ^ "Latin Pop Albums > 19 April 2003". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 115 (16). 19 April 2003. Retrieved 30 April 2013. 
  43. ^ "American album certifications – Selena – Ones". Recording Industry Association of America.  If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH