List of secondary highways in Kenora District

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This is a list of secondary highways in Kenora District, most of which serve as logging roads or provide access to isolated and sparsely populated areas in the Kenora District of northwestern Ontario.

Highway 525[edit]

Further information: Ontario Highway 525

Highway 525 shield

Highway 525
Route information
Length: 35.5 km[3] (22.1 mi)
Existed: 1956[1]–1972[2]
(in Gravenhurst)
1982 – present
Major junctions
South end:  Highway 596 near Minaki
North end: Islington Indian Reserve entrance
Location
Divisions: Kenora District
Major cities: Whitedog
Highway system
Highway 524 Highway 526

Secondary Highway 525, commonly referred to as Highway 525, is a provincially maintained secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It is a short, remote secondary highway that links Highway 596 to the Wabaseemoong First Nations reserve. It is the second-westernmost secondary highway in the province, Highway 673 being the first. The route was commissioned by 1982 along what was formerly Highway 596; a former use of the route number existed between 1956 and 1973 in Gravenhurst.

Highway 594[edit]

Highway 596[edit]

Secondary Highway 596, commonly referred to as Highway 596, is a provincial secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It connects the city of Kenora and the Trans-Canada Highway to Minaki, with a length of 48 kilometres. The highway was built around 1956 in preparation for the construction of the White Dog Falls Station hydroelectric dam near the White Dog Reserve.

Termini and Intersections[edit]

  • Northern terminus: The hamlet of Minaki, Ontario, shortly before a crossing with the Canadian National Railway's transcontinental line.
  • Southern terminus: Highway 17 in Kenora, Ontario.
  • Intersections
    • Kenora, ON
      • King's Highway 17, Trans-Canada Highway, Southern Terminus in Kenora
      • King's Highway 17A, Kenora Bypass
    • Kenora District
      • Provincial Secondary Highway 641
      • Trail, to Wade, Ontario
      • Provincial Secondary Highway 525, to White Dog Reserve
      • Undefined Rd 24, Northern terminus at Minaki, Ontario

Highway 601[edit]

Highway 603[edit]

Highway 603 shield

Highway 603
Route information
Length: 4.6 km[3] (2.9 mi)
Major junctions
South end: Highway 17 at Borups Corners
North end: Dyment
Location
Towns: Borups Corners, Dyment
Highway system
Highway 602 Highway 604

Secondary Highway 603, commonly referred to as Highway 603, is a short secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Located within the Kenora District, the highway extends for 6.3 kilometres (3.9 mi) from a junction with Highway 17 at Borups Corners northerly to the community of Dyment.

Highway 604[edit]

Highway 604 shield

Highway 604
Route information
Length: 12.6 km (7.8 mi)
Major junctions
From: Highway 17
To: Highway 671
Location
Major cities: Kenora
Highway system

Secondary Highway 604, commonly referred to as Highway 604, was a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its total length was approximately 12.6 kilometres (7.8 mi). Its western terminus was Highway 17 in Kenora, and its eastern terminus was Highway 671, 1.9 kilometres (1.2 mi) past Kenora Airport. The highway was transferred to the town of Jeffray Melick on April 1, 1997, and the Connecting Link through Kenora removed.

Highway 605[edit]

Highway 609[edit]

Highway 609 shield

Highway 609
Route information
Length: 15.7 km[3] (9.8 mi)
Major junctions
East end: Highway 105 at Red Lake Road
North end: Clay Lake
Location
Towns: Red Lake Road, Quibell
Highway system

Secondary Highway 609, commonly referred to as Highway 609, is a 15.7-kilometre (9.8 mi)[3] secondary highway in Kenora District in northwestern Ontario, Canada. The highway runs west from a junction with Ontario Highway 105 at the community of Red Lake Road to the community of Quibell, passing over the Wabigoon River at Quibell Dam, then heads north over the Canadian National Railway transcontinental main line onward to its terminus at Clay Lake.[4][5] The road is paved from Highway 105 to Quibell, then gravel to its terminus at Clay Lake,[5][6] and had an AADT traffic count in 2007 of 100 for its entire length.[3]

Highway 618[edit]

Further information: Ontario Highway 618

Highway 618 shield

Highway 618
Route information
Length: 11.7 km[3] (7.3 mi)
Existed: 1956[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: Olsen Mine Road in Starratt-Olsen
East end:  Highway 105 – Ear Falls, Vermillion Bay
Location
Divisions: Kenora District
Towns: Red Lake
Highway system
Highway 617 Highway 619

Secondary Highway 618, commonly referred to as Highway 618, is a provincially maintained secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It connects Olsen Mine and Madsen with the northern terminus of Highway 105 in the town of Red Lake. The 11.7-kilometre (7.3 mi) route was established in 1956, and has remained the same since then. It passes through a remote forested area, and encounters no communities of any significance outside of Red Lake.

Highway 641[edit]

Highway 641 shield

Highway 641
Route information
Length: 13.4 km[3] (8.3 mi)
Major junctions
North end:  Highway 596
South end:  Highway 17
Location
Counties: Kenora District
Towns: Laclu
Highway system

Secondary Highway 641, commonly referred to as Highway 641, is a secondary highway in Kenora District, Ontario, Canada. Its total length is approximately 13.4 kilometres (8.3 mi). Its northern terminus at Ontario Highway 596, and its southern terminus is at Highway 17 in Kenora, just east of the junction of Highway 17 with the western end of the Kenora Bypass (Ontario Highway 17A).[5] The highway passes under the Kenora Bypass and the Canadian Pacific Railway transcontinental main line, and travels through the settlement of Laclu. The highway had an AADT traffic count of 510 in 2007.[3]

Highway 642[edit]

Highway 642 shield

Highway 642
Route information
Length: 73.9 km[3] (45.9 mi)
Major junctions
West end:  Highway 516
East end:  Highway 590
Location
Counties: Kenora District
Towns: Sioux Lookout, Umfreville, Silver Dollar
Highway system

Secondary Highway 642, commonly referred to as Highway 642, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Its total length is approximately 73.9 kilometres (45.9 mi). Its western terminus is First Avenue North in Sioux Lookout, and its eastern terminus is at Highway 599 in Silver Dollar. The highway crosses the Marchington River and the Canadian National Railway transcontinental main line[5] at the unincorporated place of Superior Junction.

Highway 646[edit]

Highway 646 shield

Highway 646
Major junctions
West end: Pickle Crow
East end: Pickle Lake Airport
Location
Districts: Kenora District
Major cities: Pickle Lake
Highway system
Highway 645 Highway 647

Secondary Highway 646, commonly referred to as Highway 646, was a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. It was the second-most northerly provincial highway in the entire network, surpassed only by Highway 599. It is no longer a secondary highway, and appears as Pickle Lake Road on road signs. The road travels through Pickle Lake, where it intersects Highway 599, and links Pickle Lake with the community of Pickle Crow to the east and the Pickle Lake Airport to the west.

Highway 647[edit]

Secondary Highway 647, commonly referred to as Highway 647, is a short secondary highway in northwestern Ontario. Its southeastern terminus is at Ontario Highway 17 at the west edge of the community of Vermilion Bay, and its northwestern terminus is at Blue Lake Provincial Park, a distance of 10 kilometres (6 mi)[7] Beyond this point, the road continues as an unposted local road to the community of McIntosh and further to the Forest Lake Dam, providing access to cottages and resorts on the Indian Lake Chain.[8]

Highway 657[edit]

Highway 658[edit]

Further information: Ontario Highway 658

Highway 658 shield

Highway 658
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 29.4 km[3] (18.3 mi)
History: Highway 128 (1956–1975)
Highway 666 (1975–1985)
Major junctions
South end:  Highway 17 – Kenora
North end: CNR Station in Redditt
Location
Counties: Kenora District
Highway system
Highway 657 Highway 661

Secondary Highway 658, commonly referred to as Highway 658, is a provincially maintained highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. The highway extends 29 kilometres (18 mi) between the city of Kenora and the community of Redditt. For a decade, Highway 658 was numbered as Highway 666, leading to numerous sign thefts and a petition by members of a church on the route. This petition eventually led to the route being renumbered in late-1985.

Highway 664[edit]

Highway 664 shield

Highway 664
Route information
Maintained by the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario
Length: 17.0 km[3] (10.6 mi)
History: Established 1934 (as part of Highway 72)
Redesignated 1954 (as Highway 116)
1975 (as Highway 664)
Major junctions
West end: Hudson
East end: Highway 72 near Sioux Lookout
Location
Districts: Kenora
Highway system
Highway 663 Highway 665

Secondary Highway 664, commonly referred to as Highway 664, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Located in Kenora District, the highway links the community of Hudson to Highway 72 near Sioux Lookout. In late July 2012, it was announced that the road would be renamed The Leo Bernier Memorial Highway, after the former MPP for Kenora and Minister of Northern Affairs.[9]

History[edit]

The highway began as a part of Highway 72 in 1934. In 1954, the road was renumbered as Highway 116, but may have been briefly designated as "Highway 72A" before that. By 1975, the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario had decided to demote three very lightly travelled Kings Highways in Northwestern Ontario to secondary highway status. Those roadways were Highway 116 (which became Highway 664), Highway 119 (which became Highway 665), and Highway 128 (which became the infamous Highway 666, and was consequently renumbered as Highway 658 in 1985.)

The road today is a typical secondary highway: lightly travelled, connecting a town to a main Kings Highway (Highway 72), and has slightly narrower and coarser pavement than Kings Highways.

Communities[edit]

Highway 665[edit]

Highway 665 shield

Highway 665
Route information
Length: 20.6 km[3] (12.8 mi)
Existed: 1956 (as Highway 119)
1975 (as Highway 665) – present
Major junctions
North end: Richan
South end:  Highway 17 near Dryden
Location
Counties: Kenora District
Highway system
Highway 664 Highway 667

Secondary Highway 665, commonly referred to as Highway 665, is a secondary highway in the Canadian province of Ontario. Located in Kenora District, the highway links the community of Richan to Highway 17 near Dryden.

The road was formerly a primary highway, with the designation of Highway 119, but was demoted to secondary highway status in 1975 along with two other routes in the Kenora District.

Highway 671[edit]

Secondary Highway 671 is a highway 37.5 km in length. It stretches from the intersection with Jones Road to one of the East Indian Reserves.

Highway 673[edit]

Highway 673 shield

Highway 673
Route information
Length: 8.1 km[3] (5.0 mi)
Existed: 1993 – present
Major junctions
North end: Highway 17 west of Kenora
South end: Shoal Lake
Location
Counties: Kenora District
Highway system

Secondary Highway 673, commonly referred to as Highway 673, is one of the newest secondary highways in Ontario, and one of the newest of any provincially-designated highway, having been constructed in 1993. The road is also Ontario's most westerly highway aside from Highway 17, which continues into nearby Manitoba. it is also one of the shortest secondary highways in the system.

The road starts at Highway 17, and provides access to the three Indian Reservations on Shoal Lake (Shoal Lake #39, Shoal Lake #40, and Kejick First Nation).

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Ontario Department of Highways (1956). Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by C.P. Robins.
  2. ^ Department of Transportation and Communications (February 1972). Ontario Road Map (Map). Cartography by Photogrammetrey Office. Section G23.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2007). "Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT) counts". Retrieved July 7, 2011. 
  4. ^ "Northwestern Ontario Road Conditions Report". Ministry of Transportation of Ontario. 2011-07-09. Retrieved 2011-07-09. 
  5. ^ a b c d Ministry of Transportation of Ontario (2010-01-01) (PDF). Map 13 (Map). 1 : 1,600,000. Official road map of Ontario. http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/traveller/map/images/pdf/northont/sheets/Map13.pdf. Retrieved 2011-07-09.
  6. ^ "Secondary Highway 609 - www.OntHighways.com". OntHighways.com. 2007-11-18. Retrieved 2011-07-09. 
  7. ^ Ontario Provincial Series Road Map, Canadian Automobile Association, 2004.
  8. ^ "Toporama - Topographic Map Sheets 52F13, 52F14". Atlas of Canada. Natural Resources Canada. 2010-02-04. Retrieved 2011-07-09. 
  9. ^ http://netnewsledger.com/2012/07/31/ontario-has-dedicated-highway-664-to-leo-bernier/

External links[edit]