Opéra (Paris Métro)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Opéra
Metro Paris - Ligne 3 - station Opera 05.jpg
Date opened 19 October 1904 (1904)
Accesses Pl. de l'Opéra (two)
6, rue Scribe
43, av. de l'Opéra
Municipality/
Arrondissement
the 2nd arrondissement of Paris
Fare zone 1
Next stations
Paris Métro Line 3
Direction
Pont de Levallois – Bécon
Direction
Gallieni
Havre – Caumartin Quatre-Septembre
Paris Métro Line 7
Direction
Villejuif or
Mairie d'Ivry
Direction
La Courneuve – 8 Mai 1945
Pyramides Chaussée d'Antin – La Fayette
Paris Métro Line 8
Direction
Balard
Direction
Pointe du Lac
Madeleine Richelieu – Drouot
Connections to other stations

Saint-Augustin (9)
Saint-Lazare (3, 12, 13, 14)
Haussmann – Saint-Lazare (RER E)
Havre – Caumartin (3, 9)
Auber (RER A)

List of stations of the Paris Métro
Map pointer.svg
Paris map with arrondissements.jpg
Location of metro station

Opéra is a station of the Paris Métro, named after the nearby Opera Garnier, built by the architect Charles Garnier. It is located at the end of the Avenue de l'Opera, one of the accesses being opposite the Opera, and serves the district of the Boulevard Haussmann. Three Métro lines (3, 7 and 8) cross each other at one point, known as a "well".

The station offers a connection to Auber RER station and indirectly with the Havre-Caumartin Métro station, however, ongoing construction work has limited the access Metro users have to it.

The station is famous for its strong odors of sewers. When it was being built, there were concerns that one of Hector Guimard's characteristic iron metro entrances would spoil the view of the opera house, so a marble entrance was built instead.

History[edit]

Construction under scaffolding in the Place de l'Opéra. The roof of line 3 leading to the Rue Auber is visible.

The line 3 platforms opened on 19 October 1904 as part of the first section of the line opened between Père Lachaise and Villiers. A twenty metre high masonry well was built to avoid the need for heavy underpinning work when lines 7 and 8 were planned to be built. This work was affected by groundwater, which required the support of three concrete pillars, made by sinking caissons with workers digging out the mud with compressed air. The work lasted eleven months, from March 1903 to February 1904.[1] The line 7 platforms opened on 5 November 1910 as part of the first section of the line opened between Opéra and Porte de la Villette. The line 8 platforms opened on 13 July 1913 as part of the first section of the line opened between Opéra and Beaugrenelle (now Charles Michels station on line 10).

Station layout[edit]

Street Level
B1 Mezzanine for platform connection
Line 3 platforms
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Westbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 3 jms.svg toward Pont de Levallois – Bécon (Havre – Caumartin)
Eastbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 3 jms.svg toward Gallieni (Quatre-Septembre)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Line 7 platforms
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 7 jms.svg toward Villejuif – Louis Aragon or Mairie d'Ivry (Pyramides)
Northbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 7 jms.svg toward La Courneuve – 8 Mai 1945 (Chaussée d'Antin – La Fayette)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Line 8 platforms
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Westbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 8 jms.svg toward Balard (Madeleine)
Eastbound Metro-M.svg Paris m 8 jms.svg toward Pointe du Lac (Richelieu – Drouot)
Side platform, doors will open on the right

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Robert, Jean (1983). Notre métro ("Our metro") (in French). p. 54. 




Coordinates: 48°52′14″N 2°19′56″E / 48.870636°N 2.3323526°E / 48.870636; 2.3323526