Opelika High School

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Opelika High School
Opelika High School.JPG
Address
1700 Lafayette Pkwy
Opelika, Alabama, 36801
United States
Coordinates 32°40′06″N 85°22′11″W / 32.6683°N 85.3697°W / 32.6683; -85.3697Coordinates: 32°40′06″N 85°22′11″W / 32.6683°N 85.3697°W / 32.6683; -85.3697
Information
Established 1911[1]
Status Active
School district Opelika City Schools
Superintendent Dr. Mark D. Neighbors
Principal Dr. Farrell Seymore
Vice principal Mr. Russ Hardwick
Vice principal Mrs. Amanda Inabinett
Vice principal Mr. Kendrick Myers
Grades 9-12
Color(s) Red and Black         
Athletics AHSAA (6A)
Nickname Bulldogs
Newspaper Mainstreet Gazette
Yearbook Zig-Zag

Opelika High School is located in Opelika, Lee County, Alabama. Opelika High School, of the Opelika City Schools, serves students in grades 9-12. The principal is Dr. Farrell Seymore. The school's Assistant Principals are Amanda Inabinett and Russ Hardwick. OHS offers classes designed for each student’s learning level, from individual assistance to Advanced Placement. Advanced Placement classes are offered in History, Biology, Chemistry, Government & Economics, English Composition, Art and Calculus. Dual enrollment is an option for students to earn both high school and college credits at Southern Union State Community College whose Opelika campus is located directly across the street from the high school. Courses available for dual enrollment include Pre-Calculus, Calculus and US History 1.

Career Technical classes prepare students for immediate transition following graduation into the workplace or articulated courses offered at Southern Union and other community colleges. Programs include horticulture, business information technology, family and consumer science, engineering, and health science. The annual horticulture department plant sale raises thousands of dollars for scholarships and program expenses. A new Avatar Apps and Answers class is leading the way for innovative programs which will allow students to stay abreast of the ever-changing technological world. Beginning January 2012 a new course, Direct Current, will be the first dual enrollment technical course.

Continuing the strong arts program of the school system, OHS offers band, chorus, visual arts, theater, and video production.

OHS also provides unique opportunities for students in courses such as desktop publishing, guitar, and foreign languages including Latin, Spanish and French. Students enrolled in desktop publishing produce Perspectives, an award winning literary magazine for which the art and graphics are provided by students enrolled in an advanced art class. Other publications include The Mainstreet Gazette, a student newspaper, and ZigZag, the student yearbook.

Athletics is another important component of the high school experience. The athletics program is a competitive 6A program that offers many different opportunities. Sports include football, baseball, track, cross country, soccer, wrestling, volleyball, golf, basketball, swimming, softball, tennis and a newly formed cheerleader competition squad. Students may also choose to participate in any of approximately 30 clubs ranging from Future Farmers of America to the National Honor Society.

Academics[edit]

OHS offers classes designed for each student’s learning level, from individual assistance to Advanced Placement. Advanced Placement classes are offered in History, Biology, Chemistry, Government & Economics, English Composition, Art and Calculus. Dual enrollment is an option for students to earn both high school and college credits at Southern Union State Community College whose Opelika campus is located directly across the street from the high school. Courses available for dual enrollment include Pre-Calculus, Calculus and US History 1.

Career Technical classes prepare students for immediate transition following graduation into the workplace or articulated courses offered at Southern Union and other community colleges. Programs include horticulture, business information technology, family and consumer science, engineering, and health science. The annual horticulture department plant sale raises thousands of dollars for scholarships and program expenses. A new Avatar Apps and Answers class is leading the way for innovative programs which will allow students to stay abreast of the ever-changing technological world. Beginning January 2012 a new course, Direct Current, will be the first dual enrollment technical course.

Continuing the strong arts program of the school system, OHS offers band, chorus, visual arts, theater, and video production. The band department includes concert, symphonic and jazz bands in addition to the award-winning “Spirit of the South” marching band. Four different choirs are offered by the choral department: the Ovations coed show choir, the Impressions girls’ show choir, Women’s Chamber Choir and Chamber Choir. The show choir groups perform and compete all over the country and have received countless accolades including Grand Champion in the Fame Showchoir America Competition in Washington, D.C., Best Show Design, Best Choreography and Best Vocals awards in numerous competitions, and was the highest ranked Alabama school in the 2009 National Showchoir Ranking System.

The OHS Theatre Society is known around the region and state for its quality performances. A play in the fall, an advanced theatre competition at mid-year and a spring musical all attract hundreds from surrounding communities. In addition to performances, theatre department courses include set design, set-up and light/sound production.

OHS also provides unique opportunities for students in courses such as desktop publishing, guitar, and foreign languages including Latin, Spanish and French. Students enrolled in desktop publishing produce Perspectives, an award winning literary magazine for which the art and graphics are provided by students enrolled in an advanced art class. Other publications include The Mainstreet Gazette, a student newspaper, and ZigZag, the student yearbook.

Athletics is another important component of the high school experience. The athletics program is a competitive 6A program that offers many different opportunities. Sports include football, baseball, track, cross country, soccer, wrestling, volleyball, golf, basketball, swimming, softball and tennis. A newly formed cheerleader competition squad recently placed second in the state competition. Students may also choose to participate in any of approximately 30 clubs ranging from Future Farmers of America to the National Honor Society.

History[edit]

Opelika High School burns, 1917.

While several private high schools, including two that went by the name "Opelika High School", existed in Opelika as early as the 1860s, the current Opelika High School wasn't founded until 1911. From 1902 to 1911, Opelika offered classes through the 10th grade at the Opelika Public School, but was not able to afford a high school.[1][2] A 1907 law called for the formation of a "county high school" in each county run by the county board of education; when the state high school commission looked to establish such a high school in Lee County in 1911, only Opelika applied, and so the school was located there.[3] This school's opening in the fall of 1911 marks the founding of Opelika High School.[1] In 1914, Auburn High School successfully petitioned the state high school commission to take the county flagship status as the "Lee County High School" away from Opelika, starting the two schools long-standing rivalry, and the Opelika school became officially known as "Opelika High School" for the first time, operating as a town school.[2]

Opelika kept the old county high school building until 1917. On Saturday, January 20, 1917, Opelika High School burned to the ground.[4] The two prior private schools in Opelika named "Opelika High School" also burned, in 1867 and in 1894.[5] For the next year, classes were held in the old Opelika Public School building, until a new structure could be built on the same grounds. With the new building, Opelika High School was renamed in 1918 Henry G. Clift High School, after the then-mayor of Opelika.[1] Opelika High School football started in 1922, with OHS falling to Alexander City (today Benjamin Russell) 71-0 in both schools' first ever game.[6] It would be 1925 before Opelika High met Auburn High for the first time on the gridiron, a 21-6 loss; the Bulldogs and Tigers have met each year in football since 1933, with the OHS leading the overall series 42-38-3.[7]

In 1959, Opelika High moved into a new building on Denson Drive, and was subsequently renamed "Opelika High School" again. In 1972, OHS moved again, this time into the current facility on LaFayette Parkway.[1]

Publications[edit]

Opelika High School students produce a school newspaper called "The Bulldog, which, starting this year, comes out once a month. The Bulldog's advisers are English teacher Charles Hannah and Opelika Observer news editor Cliff McCollum. The Bulldog includes Editorial, Entertainment, News, Feature, Sports, and Club News sections. The staff sells ads to local businesses to fund the paper, which is printed by Media General.[citation needed]

The high school's yearbook is titled "Zig-Zag."[citation needed]

Perspectives magazine[edit]

Students also prepare and distribute a literary-art magazine of student-submitted work called Perspectives. It is published once a year, and distributed during the spring semester. Dr. Charles Hannah started the magazine in 1987 as an after-school activity. Since then, Perspectives has become a full class that meets first block every other day. The 2012 edition will be the 25th issue.[dated info]

Perspectives magazine achievements

Alabama Scholastic Press[8] All Alabama: 1997, 2002 – 04, 2006 – 08 Superior: 1996, 1999, 2005, 2009 – 11 Excellent: 2000 – 01

Alabama Writers Forum[9] Certificate of Commendation: 2001 Exceptional Graphic Design: 2002, 2004, – 05, 2007 – 08 Best Overall Literary Content & Graphic Design: 2003

American Scholastic Press[10] First Place with Special Merit: 1997–2011 Most Outstanding High School Literary-Art Magazine: 2001, 2003, 2007 – 08, 2010 – 11 First Place: 1996

Columbia Scholastic Press[11] Gold Medalist Certificate: 1997 – 99, 2001 – 11 Silver Medalist Certificate: 2000

NCTE[12] Superior: 1997, 1999–2002, 2004, 2007 – 11 Highest Award: 1996, 1998, 2003, 2005 – 06

Athletics[edit]

The Official Opelika City Schools Logo

Opelika competes in class 6A of the AHSAA. Its primary athletic rival is the Auburn High School Tigers. The mascot is the bulldog. More specifically, there are 2 bulldogs called "Ope" and "Lika" which represent Opelika High School. The school colors are red and black. The school fields 11 varsity sports teams:

  • Football
  • Baseball
  • Softball
  • Wrestling (Boys)
  • Track and Field (Boys and Girls)
  • Cross Country (Boys and Girls)
  • Volleyball (Girls)
  • Basketball (Boys and Girls)
  • Soccer (Boys and Girls)
  • Golf (Boys and Girls)
  • Tennis (Boys and Girls)

Football achievements[edit]

  • 2012 State Champion Runner Ups
  • 2007 Region 3 Champions 2nd Round playoffs
  • 2006 Region 3 Champions 4th Round Playoffs
  • 2005 Region 3 Champions 4th Round Playoffs
  • 2004 Region 3 4th Place 1st Round Playoffs
  • 2003 Region 3 Champions 3rd Round Playoffs
  • 2002 Region 3 Champions 3rd Round Playoffs
  • 2001 Region 3 Runner-up 2nd Round Playoffs
  • 2000 Region 3 Runner-up 2nd Round Playoffs
  • 1999 Area 5 Runner-up 2nd Round Playoffs
  • 1998 Area 5 Champions 3rd Round Playoffs
  • 1994 Area 5 1st Round Playoffs
  • 1993 Area 5 3rd Round Playoffs
  • 1992 Area 5 2nd Round Playoffs
  • 1991 Area 5 2nd Round Playoffs
  • 1990 Area 5 1st Round Playoffs
  • 1986 Area 5 Champions 3rd Round Playoffs
  • 1985 Area 5 Champions 1st Round Playoffs
  • 1984 Area 5 1st Round Playoffs

NFL alumni[edit]

Player Name College Team Position Draft Pick Career Duration NFL Team
Zach Clayton Auburn DT Round: 7 / Pick: 212 2011–Present Tennessee
Will Herring Auburn LB Round: 5 / Pick: 161 2007–Present Seattle, New Orleans
T.J. Jackson Auburn DT Free Agent 2006–2008 Atlanta, Kansas City
Melvin Oliver LSU DT Round: 6 / Pick: 197 2006–2007 San Francisco

MLB alumni[edit]

Player Name College Team Position Draft Pick Career Duration MLB Team
Roy Lee Jackson Tuskegee P Round 2 / Pick: 273 1977–1986 New York Mets, Toronto, San Diego, Minnesota
Rod Lindsey None OF Round 39 / Pick: 1074 2000-2000 Detroit

Basketball achievements[edit]

Boys[edit]

  • 2004 Area 3 3rd Place 1st Round Southeast Sub-Regional
  • 2003 Area 3 Runner-up 1st Round Southeast Sub-Regional
  • 2002 Area 4 Runner-up Quarterfinals Southeast Regional
  • 2001 Area 4 Runner-up 1st Round Southeast Sub-Regional

Track & Field achievements[edit]

Boys[edit]

  • 2007 6A State Champions[13]
  • 2006 6A State Champions[13]
  • 2004 6A State Champions[13]
  • 2003 6A State Champions[13]
  • 2000 6A State Champions[13]
  • 1999 6A State Champions[13]
  • 1998 6A State Champions[13]
  • 1997 6A Freshman State Champions[13]

Tennis achievements[edit]

Boys[edit]

  • 1991 6A State Champions [14]
  • 1979 6A Individual State Champion, Mike Gunter[14]

Wrestling achievements[edit]

Team State Champion[edit]

1958 (Opelika High School was also known as Clift)[15]

1956 (Opelika High School was also known as Clift)[15]

Individual State Champions[edit]

  • 2012 Brian White (115 lbs.)[16]
  • 2011 Brian White (103 lbs.)[17]
  • 2010 Brian White (103 lbs.)[18]
  • 2009 Hunter Robinson (140 lbs.)[19]
  • 2007 Sam Trammell (215 lbs.)[20]
  • 2006 Sam Trammell (215 lbs.)[21]

Other organizations[edit]

Opelika High Theatre Society[edit]

Opelika High School band

The OHS Theatre Society is known around the region and state for its quality performances. A play in the fall, an advanced theatre competition at mid-year and a spring musical all attract hundreds from surrounding communities. The 2011 - 2012 Season included Our Town, Take the Repeat-an original One Act Musical, and Anything Goes. In addition to performances, theatre department courses include set design, set-up and light/sound production. Past productions include Sweeney Todd, Oliver, Les Misérables, The Man Who Came to Dinner, Our Town, Brighton Beach Memoirs, the Sound of Music and many more.

The Opelika High Theatre Society is under the direction of Mr. Revel Gholston.

Showchoir[edit]

Four different choirs are offered by the OHS choral department: the Ovations coed show choir, the Impressions girls’ show choir, Women’s Chamber Choir and Chamber Choir. The show choir groups perform and compete all over the country and have received countless accolades including Grand Champion in the Fame Showchoir America Competition in Washington, D.C., Best Show Design, Best Choreography and Best Vocals awards in numerous competitions, and was the highest ranked Alabama school in the 2009 National Showchoir Ranking System.

The OHS Choral Department is under the direction of Mrs. Allyson Petrone,Director, and Mr. Calvin Ellis, Assistant Director.

Bands[edit]

The Opelika Band program is a source of pride for the Opelika City School System, its students, as well as parents and the entire community. The band program begins in the 7th grade at Opelika Middle School and continues through the 12th grade at Opelika High School. The band maintains 20% of the student population, almost 350 students.

Beginning in 7th grade, students at Opelika Middle School are encouraged to discover their musical talents in Beginning Band. Students have the opportunity to “audition” the instruments and become acquainted with the basics of music notation as well as proper technique on the instrument. As students progress, they may be invited to become a member of the Concert Band. This band consists of students who are progressing adequately, but may need further instruction before moving into the Symphonic Band.

Students who progress to the 8th grade can become members of the Symphonic Band. This group is composed of students who have achieved their musical goals in the 7th grade and intend on being a part of the band into high school. This band has maintained a long history of success whether it is being recognized at Music Performance Assessment or competing in competitive festivals in Orlando, FL.

Opelika Middle School Bands have also featured Jazz Bands and Percussion Ensembles as the schedule allows. Typically, the instructors and students meet at 7am in order to rehearse and prepare for concerts and activities.

The Opelika High School Band Program consists of several music ensembles: the marching band, Symphonic Band, Concert Band, and Jazz Band. There are also two new indoor visual ensembles, the Winter Guard and Indoor Percussion Ensemble and Concert Percussion Ensemble. Below is a brief description of each ensemble.

The Opelika High School Marching Band, also known as “The Spirit of the South” meets and practices during the summer and through the fall semester. With rehearsals after school, this ensemble regularly practices and works towards achieving a high level of musicianship and marching technique. This group performs at every football game and competes at marching competitions throughout the year. The marching band averages 200 students per year and consists of the 9th-12th grade students who play wind or percussion instruments along with an outstanding visual ensemble made up of majorettes, color guard, and the “Showstoppers” kickline. The “Spirit of the South” has traveled to many different destinations throughout the southeast and the nation. Some of the more recent trips and achievements have been multiple trips to Orlando, Philadelphia, and Chicago in 2011 to participate in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade. The “Spirit of the South” has twice performed in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, in 1989 and 1994.

The OHS band is under the direction of Mr. Jason Smith and the assistant band director is Mr. Mike McGlynn. The OMS band is under the direction of Mr. Richard Holland.

FFA[edit]

Opelika High School's FFA includes over 300 members.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Opelika Schools - learning through the years", retrieved August 2, 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Auburn May Get County High School", Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, May 3, 1914.
  3. ^ Stephen B. Weeks, History of Public School Education in Alabama, (Washington: US Government Printing Office, 1915), 185; "Opelika Gets Lee County High School", Montgomery Advertiser, June 29, 1911.
  4. ^ "Opelika High School Building Burns Saturday", Columbus Ledger-Enquirer, January 21, 1917.
  5. ^ "Burning of the Opelika High School Building", Columbus Daily Enquirer, March 27, 1867; "Opelika Seminary Burned", Columbus Daily Enquirer, March 27, 1894.
  6. ^ "Alexander is Winner over Opelika Team", Montgomery Advertiser, October 1, 1922.
  7. ^ "Opelika vs. Auburn", retrieved May 16, 2011.
  8. ^ "Alabama Scholastic Press Association". 
  9. ^ "Alabama Writers' Forum". 
  10. ^ "American Scholastic Press". 
  11. ^ "Columbia Scholastic Press Association". 
  12. ^ "National Council of Teachers of English". 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 
  14. ^ a b "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 
  15. ^ a b "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 
  16. ^ "TrackWrestling.com". 
  17. ^ "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 
  18. ^ "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 
  19. ^ "Alabama High School Athletics Association". 
  20. ^ "Alabama High School Athletics Association". 
  21. ^ "Alabama High School Athletic Association". 

External links[edit]