OpenNet Initiative

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The OpenNet Initiative (ONI) is a joint project whose goal is to monitor and report on internet filtering and surveillance practices by nations. The project employs a number of technical means, as well as an international network of investigators, to determine the extent and nature of government-run internet filtering programs. Participating academic institutions include the Citizen Lab at the Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto; Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard Law School; the Oxford Internet Institute (OII) at University of Oxford; and, The SecDev Group, which took over from the Advanced Network Research Group at the Cambridge Security Programme, University of Cambridge.

Methods[edit]

ONI uses several methods to test and document internet censorship in a country.

  • Development and deployment of a suite of technical enumeration tools and core methodologies for the study of Internet filtering and surveillance;
  • Capacity-building among networks of local advocates and researchers;
  • Advanced studies exploring the consequences of current and future trends and trajectories in filtering and surveillance practices, and their implications for domestic and international law and governance regimes.[1]

ONI Principal Investigators[edit]

The ONI principal investigators are:[1]

Major Accomplishments[edit]

ONI Asia[edit]

In December 2007, the International Development Research Center of Canada approved a $1.2 million (CAD) project to expand the work of the Open Net Initiative to 15 countries in Asia. The project aims to build capacity among partners located in these countries to carry on the work of the Open Net Initiative at a national level. ONI Asia is managed by Rafal Rohozinski (The SecDev Group), and Ronald Deibert (The Citizen Lab). The regional coordinator is Al Alegre (Foundation for Media Alternatives, Philippines).

Psiphon[edit]

Psiphon is a censorship circumvention solution that allows users to access blocked web pages in countries where the Internet is censored. Psiphon allows a regular home computer to act as a personal, encrypted proxy server that allows the administrator to specify a username and password that is, in turn, given to someone in a country where internet censorship is prevalent so that users in that country will be able to browse the internet in a secure, uncensored manner.

In 2008 Psiphon was spun off as a Canadian corporation that continues to develop advanced censorship circumvention systems and technologies. Psiphon maintains its research and development lab and computer network "red team" at The Citizen Lab, Munk Centre for International Studies, University of Toronto.

Censorship research reports[edit]

There are many research papers available from the ONI that show just how pervasive internet censorship is in a certain country or region. The topics covered in these papers include not only the software or solutions used to censor the Internet, but also what kind of content is blocked (political, social, conflict/security, Internet tools, pornographic, …).[2]

Selected recent publications include:

  • Overviews of Internet censorship and filtering in eight regions: Asia, Australia/New Zealand, the Commonwealth of Independent States, Europe, Latin America, the Middle East and North Africa, sub-Saharan Africa, and the United States/Canada.[3]
  • Country profiles summarizing the Internet censorship situation and reporting the results of ONI's testing for technical Internet filtering in 74 countries, 2007 to present.[4][5]
  • Maps providing a graphical representation of research into Internet censorship and filtering.[6]
  • In the Name of God: Faith Based Internet Censorship in Majority Muslim Countries, August 2011.[7]
  • The Emergence of Open and Organized Pro-Government Cyber Attacks in the Middle East: The Case of the Syrian Electronic Army, May 2011.[8]
  • West Censoring East: The Use of Western Technologies by Middle East Censors, 2010-2011, March 2011.[9]
  • Policing Content in the Quasi-Public Sphere, Jillian C. York, with Robert Faris, Ron Deibert, and Rebekah Heacock, September 2010.[10]
  • Bulletin: Sex, Social Mores and Keyword Filtering: Microsoft Bing in the "Arabian Countries", March 2010.[11]

Books[edit]

  • ONI published its first book, ACCESS DENIED—The Practice and Politics of Internet Filtering, through the MIT Press in 2008.[12]
  • A second volume, ACCESS CONTROLLED—The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace was published through the MIT Press in 2010.[13] This volume was sponsored by the OSCE Representative on Freedom of the Media.
  • A third volume, ACCESS CONTESTED—Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace was published through the MIT Press in 2011.[14]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "About ONI". The OpenNet Initiative. Retrieved 2008-04-17. 
  2. ^ "Reports". The OpenNet Initiative. Retrieved 2008-04-17. 
  3. ^ "Regional Overviews", OpenNet Initiatives, accessed 26 May 2013
  4. ^ "Country Profiles", OpenNet Initiative, accessed 26 May 2013
  5. ^ "Filtering Data", OpnNet Initiative, accessed 26 May 2013
  6. ^ "Amps", OpenNet Initiative, accessed 26 May 2013
  7. ^ In the Name of God: Faith Based Internet Censorship in Majority Muslim Countries (PDF), Helmi Noman, OpenNet Initiative, 1 August 2011
  8. ^ "The Emergence of Open and Organized Pro-Government Cyber Attacks in the Middle East: The Case of the Syrian Electronic Army", Helmi Noman, OpenNet Initiative, May 2011
  9. ^ "West Censoring East: The Use of Western Technologies by Middle East Censors, 2010-2011", Helmi Noman and Jillian C. York, OpenNet Initiative, March 2011
  10. ^ "Policing Content in the Quasi-Public Sphere", OpenNet Initiative, September 2010
  11. ^ "Bulletin: Sex, Social Mores and Keyword Filtering: Microsoft Bing in the 'Arabian Countries' ", Helmi Noman with Ronald Deibert, Jillian York, Caroline Nolan, Colin Maclay, and Rob Faris, OpenNet Initiative, March 2010
  12. ^ Access Denied—The Practice and Policy of Global Internet Filtering, Ronald J. Deibert, John G. Palfrey, Rafal Rohozinski and Jonathan Zittrain (eds.), MIT Press, February 2008, 320 pp., ISBN 978-0-262-54196-1 (available online)
  13. ^ Access Controlled—The Shaping of Power, Rights, and Rule in Cyberspace, Ronald J. Deibert, John G. Palfrey, Rafal Rohozinski and Jonathan Zittrain (eds.), MIT Press, April 2010, 656 pp., ISBN 978-0-262-51435-4 (available online)
  14. ^ Access Contested—Security, Identity, and Resistance in Asian Cyberspace, Ronald J. Deibert, John G. Palfrey, Rafal Rohozinski and Jonathan Zittrain (eds.), MIT Press, November 2011, 408 pp., ISBN 978-0-262-01678-0 (available online)

External links[edit]