Orange drink

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Not to be confused with Orange soft drink.
Fig. 1: Orange Drink

The term orange drink refers to a sweet, sugary, sometimes fizzy, orange-flavored drink.

Typically such beverages contain little or no orange juice and are mainly composed of water, sugar or sweeteners, flavor, coloring, and additives, sometimes in that order. As such, they are very low in nutritional value, although many are fortified with vitamin C.[1] In 2002, however, a "cheap, fortified, orange-flavored drink" was developed with the intention of improving nutrition in the third world by adding vitamin A, iron, and iodine to people's diets.[2]

Because orange drinks can be confused with orange juice, the U.S. government requires orange drinks, as well as other beverages whose names allude to fruit products, to state the percentage of juice contained above the "Nutrition Facts" label.[3] and requires companies to state them as orange drinks instead of orange juice.

Varieties[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nagourney, Eric. "Nutrition: Study Links Sugary Drinks to Teenagers' Weight." New York Times, 7 March 2006.
  2. ^ a b Cornell University (Oct. 29, 2002). Fortified orange drink, a success with Third World children, now shown to ease 'hidden hunger' in mothers and babies, Press release.
  3. ^ U.S. House of Representatives: "Requirements for Specific Nonstandardized Foods," Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21, Pt. 102, Subpart B., Sec. 102.33. Washington: Government Printing Office, 2001. (CITE: 21CFR102.33).