Orbiting Geophysical Observatory

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Artist's concept of OGO 1
OGO 1 components

Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO) refers to the six satellites launched by the United States that were in use from September 1964 to 1972, designed to study the Earth's magnetosphere.[1] The satellites successfully studied the interactions between the Earth and the Sun, despite a number of technical problems. Each satellite had 20 to 25 instruments. OGO 1, OGO 3, and OGO 5 were in equatorial orbits; OGO 2, OGO 4, and OGO 6 were in lower polar orbits.[2]

OGO launch chronology[edit]

  • OGO 1 1964-054A NORAD ID: 00879 Launched: 5 September 1964 On-orbit dry mass: 487 kg (still in orbit)
  • OGO 2 1965-081A NORAD ID: 01620 Launched: 14 October 1965 On-orbit dry mass: 507 kg (decayed 17 September 1981)
  • OGO 3 1966-049A NORAD ID: 02195 Launched: 7 June 1966 On-orbit dry mass: 515 kg (decayed 14 September 1981)
  • OGO 4 1967-073A NORAD ID: 02895 Launched:28 July 1967 On-orbit dry mass: 562 kg (decayed 16 August 1972 )
  • OGO 5 1968-014A NORAD ID: 03138 Launched: 4 March 1968 On-orbit dry mass: 611 kg (decayed 02 July 2011)
  • OGO 6 1969-051A NORAD ID: 03986 Launched: 5 June 1969 On-orbit dry mass: 632 kg (decayed 12 October 1979)

Notes[edit]

References[edit]