Order of Nine Angles

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Symbol of ONA

The Order of Nine Angles (ONA; O9A) "represent a dangerous and extreme form of Satanism"[1] and first attracted public attention during the 1980s and 1990s after being mentioned in books detailing fascist Satanism.[2][3][4][5] Presently, the ONA is organized around clandestine cells (which it calls "traditional nexions")[6][7] and around what it calls "sinister tribes".[8][9]

History[edit]

As recounted by Goodrick-Clarke in his book Black Sun, the Order of Nine Angles assert that they were formed in England in the 1960s with the merger of three neopagan temples called Camlad, The Noctulians, and Temple of the Sun. Following the original leader's emigration to Australia, it has been alleged that David Myatt took over the order and authored the now publicly available teachings of the organization which was initially based in the rural English counties of Shropshire and Herefordshire, with Goodrick-Clarke writing that "Myatt evokes a world of witches, outlaw peasant sorcerers, orgies and blood sacrifices at lonely cottages in the woods and valleys of this area where he has lived since the early 1980s".[10]

According to their own literature, they now have associates, and groups, in the United States, Europe, Australia,[11] New Zealand,[2] Canada, Iceland and Russia.

Authorship[edit]

Author Nick Ryan has asserted that Anton Long, the author of the ONA's public tracts, is a pseudonym of David Myatt, a person who was involved with the neo-Nazi movement in England.[12] This assertion is repeated by both Senholt[13] and Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke, with Goodrick-Clarke writing that David Myatt – who had previously acted "as bodyguard for British Nazi Colin Jordan"[14] - codified "its teachings into a fully developed system of initiation and training for adeptship".[15]

According to Senholt, "the role of David Myatt is paramount to the whole creation and existence of the ONA", and "Myatt's life-long devotion to various extreme ideologies has been part of a sinister game that is at the heart of the ONA".[13] This claim is supported by Per Faxneld who writes that "the ONA despises ethical behaviour, and its main ideologist David Myatt has actively participated in violent neo-Nazi and Islamist terrorist groups. The motivation for these acts is a wish to bring down the 'old order' [...] His text defending suicide attacks was featured on Hamas' website, and he was invited to speak at extremist mosques. Even more astonishing than [his transition from neo-Nazi to Muslim] is that it seems both his Nazism and Islamism are merely instruments for the ONA's underlying sinister esoteric plots."[1]

David Myatt has always denied allegations about involvement with Satanism,[2] the ONA, and using the pseudonym Anton Long, and repeatedly challenged anyone to provide any evidence of such allegations.[16][17][18][19]

Beliefs[edit]

The Order postulates Satanism as an arduous individual achievement of self-mastery and Nietzschean self-overcoming, with an emphasis on individual growth through practical acts of risk, prowess and endurance.[11] Rites of passage, often connected to promotion in grade level, include spending three months living rough in a forest bereft of human contact,[2][7] and the assumption of difficult occupations to develop personality and leadership ability.[11]

Therefore, "[t]he goal of the Satanism of the ONA is to create a new individual through direct experience, practice and self-development [with] the grades of the ONA system being highly individual, based on the initiates' own practical and real-life acts, instead of merely performing certain ceremonial rituals".[7] Thus Satanism, the ONA assert, requires venturing into the realm of the forbidden and illegal, in order to make contact with the "sphere of acausal, sinister forces of the cosmos".[11]

In addition, "one of the things that sets the ONA apart from other existing Left Hand Path groups relates to their idea of Aeons which naturally leads to long-term goals (meaning about 3-500 years), that go beyond the acts and lifespan of a single individual".[7] Hence the ONA claims that its sinister tribes are an important part of its Aeonic strategy to build a new, tribal-based, more sinister way of life, and to disrupt and eventually overthrow the societies of what it calls "the mundanes".[8]

Another difference is, according to Goodrick-Clarke, that "compared to the eclectic nature of American Satanism, many ideas and rituals of the ONA recall a native tradition of wicca and paganism. The frequent reference to wyrd, the Anglo-Saxon term for destiny, indicates a native pre-Christian tradition, while the rhythm of the seasons is upheld by holding ceremonies at the equinoxes, the rising of stars and other astronomical events."[11]

Within the initiatory system of the ONA, "insight roles play an important part [...] Undertaking an insight role means gaining real-life experience by working undercover for a period of six to eighteen months, challenging the initiate to experience something completely different from their normal life both to 'aid the Sinister dialectic' and to enhance the experience of the Initiate."[13] Therefore, "through the practice of 'insight roles', the order advocates continuous transgression of established norms, roles, and comfort zones in the development of the initiate [...] This extreme application of ideas further amplifies the ambiguity of satanic and Left Hand Path practices of antinomianism, making it almost impossible to penetrate the layers of subversion, play and counter-dichotomy inherent in the sinister dialectics."[20]

In addition to insight roles and other occult training, the ONA initiate is also expected to study and practice The Star Game, a three dimensional system of Occult correspondences used as a form of aeonic sorcery,[21][22] the advanced form of which is part of the training of what the ONA call the grade of Internal Adept[23] and which three dimensional game for two players[24] David Myatt invented in 1975[25] to be, according to Goodrick-Clarke, an esoteric part of "the graded hierarchy" of the ONA and the training for adeptship.[26]

The ONA's writings condone and encourage human sacrifice.[12][27][28] According to the ONA this "culling" serves not just a social Darwinian purpose, but is also connected to the promotion of a new Aeon: "The change that is necessary means that there must be a culling, or many cullings, which remove the worthless and those detrimental to further evolution."[29] The presencing of acausal energies, such as through culling, is meant to create a new Aeon, whose energies will then create a newer, higher civilization from the energy unleashed.[30] However, the ONA "despise animal sacrifice, maintaining that it is much better to sacrifice suitable mundanes given the abundance of human dross".[31]

Probably because of the ONA's highly radical stance, there is open animosity between the ONA and "mainstream" Satanists such as the Church of Satan.[12] The ONA publicly disavows any connection to Church of Satan, claiming the Satanic Bible to be a "watered-down philosophy".[32]

The Temple of Set proscribed the ONA in the early 1980s for its avowal of human sacrifice.[33]

In recent years, according to Senholt, "ONA-inspired activities, led by protagonist David Myatt, managed to enter the scene of grand politics and the global 'War On Terror', because of several foiled terror plots in Europe that can be linked to Myatt's writings".[13]

In popular culture[edit]

The Satanic 'Order of Nine Angles' are the leading protagonists in the 'Jack Nightingale' series of novels by Stephen Leather, published by Hodder & Stoughton. These novels include Nightmare (2012) and Midnight (2013),[34] with another novel in the series, Lastnight, published in January 2014.[35]

The ONA, fictionalized as 'the Order of Nine Angels', are also the Satanic protagonists in the 2013 novel Child for the Devil by Conrad Jones.[36]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Per Faxneld: Post-Satanism, Left Hand Paths, and Beyond in Per Faxneld & Jesper Petersen (eds) The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press (2012), p.207. ISBN 9780199779246
  2. ^ a b c d Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 1994, p. 53.
  3. ^ Lewis, James R. Satanism Today: An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture. Abc-Clio Inc., 2001.
  4. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan cults, esoteric Nazism, and the politics of identity, NYU Press, 2002, pp. 215-216.
  5. ^ Ankarloo, Bengt and Clark, Stuart. The Twentieth Century, U. Penn. Press, 1999, p. 113.
  6. ^ Frequently Asked Questions About The Order of Nine Angles
  7. ^ a b c d Senholt, Jacob C: Political Esotericism & the convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of the Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009. [1]
  8. ^ a b Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles
  9. ^ Documents of The Inner ONA
  10. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan cults, esoteric Nazism, and the politics of identity, NYU Press, 2002, pp. 215-220.
  11. ^ a b c d e Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun, NYU Press, 2002, p. 218.
  12. ^ a b c Ryan, Nick. Into a World of Hate. Routledge, 1994, p. 54.
  13. ^ a b c d Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition, in Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen (eds), The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN 9780199779246
  14. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Hitler's Priestess: Savitri Devi, the Hindu-Aryan Myth and Neo-Nazism, NYU Press, 2000, p.215
  15. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun, NYU Press, 2002, p. 217.
  16. ^ "David Myatt - A Matter of Honour". Retrieved 2012-10-10. 
  17. ^ The National-Socialist (March 1998, Thormynd Press, York, England).
  18. ^ "The Ethos of Extremism". Retrieved 2012-03-28. 
  19. ^ Professor Kaplan in his Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture, Northeastern University Press, 1998, ISBN 1-55553-331-0 states that Myatt and Long are two different people, and that the individual who used the pseudonym Anton Long was a friend of Myatt's in the 1970s and 1980s. This view is supported by Michael Newton who, in his Ku Klux Klan: History, Organization, Language, Influence – published 2007 by McFarland & Co (Jefferson, N.C) ISBN 978-0-7864-2787-1 - wrote that "David Myatt, a British neo-Nazi [only] collaborated with leaders of a Satanist sect, the Order of the Nine Angles".
  20. ^ Per Faxneld and Jesper Petersen, At the Devil's Crossroads in The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012, p.15. ISBN 9780199779246
  21. ^ Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition: Political Esotericism and the Convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of Nine Angles, in Per Faxneld & Jesper Petersen (eds): The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity, Oxford University Press (2012), p.260. ISBN 9780199779246
  22. ^ James R. Lewis & Jasper Aagaard Petersen: The Encyclopedic Sourcebook of Satanism, Prometheus Books, 2008. p.625. ISBN 9781591023906
  23. ^ Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke: Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press, 2002. p.219. ISBN 9780814731550
  24. ^ Jeffrey Kaplan & Tore Bjørgo: Nation and Race: The Developing Euro-American Racist Subculture. Northeastern University Press, 1998. p.116 ISBN 9781555533328
  25. ^ "The Star Game - History and Theory". Retrieved 2012-11-10. 
  26. ^ Nicholas Goodrick-Clarke: Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press, 2002. p.218. ISBN 9780814731550
  27. ^ http://pages.prodigy.net/aesir/tdi.htm "The Dark Imperium", essay by John J. Reilly.
  28. ^ Perlmutter, Dawn. "Skandalon 2001: The Religious Practices of Modern Satanists and Terrorists", in Anthropoetics Volume VII, number 2
  29. ^ Long, Anton. "Darkness Is My Friend: The Meaning of the Sinister Way", 1996.
  30. ^ Lewis, James R. Satanism Today: An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture, Abc-Clio Inc., 2001, p. 197.
  31. ^ "Praxis and Theory of the Order of Nine Angles". Retrieved 2013-07-26. 
  32. ^ Susej, Tsirk. The Demonic Bible, Lulu Press, 2006, pp. 35-36.
  33. ^ Satanic Letters 1
  34. ^ "The Jack Nightingale Collection". Retrieved 2013-11-11. 
  35. ^ "Stephen Leather - Lastnight". Retrieved 2013-11-11. 
  36. ^ Conrad Jones. Child for the Devil. Thames River Press. 2013. ISBN 978-0857280077

References[edit]

  • Ankarloo, Bengt and Clark, Stuart. The Twentieth Century. U. Penn. Press, 1999.
  • Gardell, Mattias. Gods of the Blood: The Pagan Revival and White Separatism. Duke University Press, 2003. ISBN 0-8223-3071-7
  • Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas. Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity. New York University Press, 2002.
  • Kaplan, Jeffrey, ed. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc., 2000.
  • Lewis, James R. "Who Serves Satan?" in Marburg Journal of Religion, Volume 6, No. 2 (June 2001).
  • Lewis, James R. Satanism Today : An Encyclopedia of Religion, Folklore, and Popular Culture, 2001, ISBN 1-57607-292-4
  • Long, Anton. Satanism: Introduction for Occultists. Thormynd Press, 1992, ISBN 0-946646-29-5
  • Order of Nine Angles. The Black Book of Satan. Thormynd Press, 1984, ISBN 0-946646-04-X
  • Order of Nine Angles. Naos. Coxland Press, 1990, ISBN 1-872543-00-6
  • Perlmutter, Dawn. "The Forensics of Sacrifice: A Symbolic Analysis of Ritualistic Crime", in Anthropoetics (The Journal of Generative Anthropology) Volume IX, number 2 (Fall 2003/Winter 2004) [2]
  • Perlmutter, Dawn. "Skandalon 2001: The Religious Practices of Modern Satanists and Terrorists", in Anthropoetics Volume VII, number 2 [3]
  • Reilly, John J. Apocalypse and Future. Xlibris Corporation, 2000, ISBN 0-7388-2356-2
  • Ryan, Nick. Homeland: Into A World of Hate. Mainstream Publishing Company Ltd., 2002, ISBN 1-84018-465-5
  • Senholt, Jacob. Secret Identities in The Sinister Tradition: Political Esotericism and the Convergence of Radical Islam, Satanism and National Socialism in the Order of Nine Angles, in Per Faxneld & Jesper Petersen (eds), The Devil's Party: Satanism in Modernity. Oxford University Press, 2012. ISBN 9780199779246
  • Sieg, George: Angular Momentum: From Traditional to Progressive Satanism in the Order of Nine Angles. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Conference: Satanism in the Modern World, November 2009 [4]
  • Wessinger, Catherine Lowman. Millennialism, Persecution, and Violence. pp. 317–318. Syracuse University Press, 2000. ISBN 0-8156-0599-4

External links[edit]