Oregon elections, 2010

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Elections were held in Oregon on Tuesday, November 2, 2010. Primary elections took place on May 18, 2010.

Federal[edit]

United States Senate[edit]

Democratic incumbent Ron Wyden is running for re-election. His Republican opponent is Jim Huffman.

United States House of Representatives[edit]

All five of Oregon's seats in the United States House of Representatives were up for re-election in 2010. All five incumbents ran for re-election, including Democrat David Wu in District 1, Republican Greg Walden in District 2, Democrat Earl Blumenauer in District 3, Democrat Peter DeFazio in District 4, and Democrat Kurt Schrader in District 5.[1]

State[edit]

Governor[edit]

Incumbent Governor Ted Kulongoski was term-limited. Former two-term governor John Kitzhaber, a Democrat, defeated the Republican nominee, former NBA player Chris Dudley.

Superintendent of Public Instruction[edit]

In May, incumbent Susan Castillo faced State Representative Ron Maurer for Superintendent of Public Instruction, a nonpartisan office. She received just over 50% of the vote, meaning that she was re-elected rather than facing a runoff in November.[1][2]

Results[edit]

Superintendent of Public Instruction election, May 18, 2010[3]
Party Candidate Votes %
Nonpartisan Susan Castillo 349,055 50.04%
Nonpartisan Ron Maurer 346,199 49.63%
Nonpartisan Write-in 2,243 0.32%
Totals 697,497 %

Treasurer[edit]

The 2010 elections in Oregon also included a special election for Treasurer to complete the term of Ben Westlund, who was elected in 2008 but died in office. Interim Treasurer Ted Wheeler defeated State Senator Rick Metsger in the Democratic primary, and then defeated Republican State Senator Chris Telfer, who was unopposed in the Republican primary, in November.

Democratic primary results[edit]

Oregon State Treasurer Democratic primary election, May 18, 2010[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ted Wheeler 215,399 64.92%
Democratic Rick Metsger 114,114 34.39%
Democratic write-ins 2,263 0.68%
Totals 331,776 %

General election results[edit]

Oregon State Treasurer special election, 2010[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ted Wheeler 729,958 54.03%
Republican Chris Telfer 553,791 40.99%
Progressive Walt Brown 36,533 2.70%
Constitution (Oregon) Michael Marsh 29,246 2.16%
write-ins 1,541 0.11%
Totals 1,351,069 100%
Democratic hold

State legislature[edit]

Sixteen of the 30 seats in the Oregon State Senate, and all 60 seats in the Oregon House of Representatives, were up for election in 2010.

Judicial Offices[edit]

Two seats on the Oregon Supreme Court, three seats on the Oregon Court of Appeals, and many Circuit Court Judges were up for election in 2010.

Ballot measures[edit]

January[edit]

Two measures, both veto referendums, appeared on the state's ballot in a January special election.

Measure 66[edit]

Raises tax on household income at and above $250,000 (and $125,000 for individual filers). Reduces income taxes on unemployment benefits in 2009. Provides funds currently budgeted for education, health care, public safety, other services.

Measure 66
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 692,687 54.27
No 583,707 45.73
Total votes 1,276,394 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,044,042 62.7
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[6]
Measure 67[edit]

Raises $10 corporate minimum tax, business minimum tax, corporate profits tax. Provides funds currently budgeted for education, health care, public safety, other services.

Measure 67
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 682,720 53.59
No 591,188 46.41
Total votes 1,273,908 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,044,042 62.7
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[6]

May[edit]

Two measures, both legislative referrals, appeared on the state's ballot in May 2010.

Measure 68[edit]

Revises constitution: Allows state to issue bonds to match voter approved school district bonds for school capital costs.

Measure 68
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 498,073 65.10
No 267,052 34.90
Total votes 765,125 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,033,951 37.6
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[7][8]
Measure 69[edit]

Amends constitution: continues and modernizes authority for lowest cost borrowing for community colleges and public universities.

Measure 69
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 546,649 71.66
No 216,157 28.34
Total votes 762,806 100
Registered voters/turnout 2,033,951 37.5
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[8][9]

November[edit]

Seven statewide measures appeared on the November ballot. Three were legislative referrals and four were citizen initiatives.[10]

Measure 70[edit]

Amends Constitution: Expands availability of home ownership loans for Oregon veterans through Oregon War Veterans' Fund.

Measure 70
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 1,180,933 84.43
No 217,679 15.56
Total votes 1,398,612 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[11]
Measure 71[edit]

Amends Constitution: Requires legislature to meet annually; limits length of legislative sessions; provides exceptions.

Measure 71
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 919,040 67.84
No 435,776 32.16
Total votes 1,354,816 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[12]
Measure 72[edit]

Amends Constitution: Authorizes exception to $50,000 state borrowing limit for state's real and personal property projects.

Measure 72
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 735,439 58.96
No 511,952 41.04
Total votes 1,247,391 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[13]
Measure 73[edit]

Requires increased minimum sentences for certain repeated sex crimes, incarceration for repeated driving under influence.

Measure 73
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 765,879 56.95
No 578,830 43.05
Total votes 1,344,709 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[14]
Measure 74[edit]

Establishes medical marijuana supply system and assistance and research programs; allows limited selling of marijuana.

Measure 74
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 758,809 56.15
Yes 592,665 43.85
Total votes 1,351,474 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[15]
Measure 75[edit]

Authorizes Multnomah County casino; casino to contribute monthly revenue percentage to state for specified purposes.

Measure 75
Choice Votes  %
Referendum failed No 914,940 68.20
Yes 426,667 31.80
Total votes 1,341,607 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[16]
Measure 76[edit]

Amends Constitution: Continues lottery funding for parks, beaches, wildlife habitat, watershed protection beyond 2014; modifies funding process

Measure 76
Choice Votes  %
Referendum passed Yes 923,931 68.98
No 415,396 31.02
Total votes 1,339,327 100
Source: Oregon State Elections Division[17]

Local[edit]

Numerous local jurisdictions — cities, counties, and regional government entities — held elections for various local offices and ballot measures as well.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Oregon 2010 Midterm Elections". The Green Papers. Retrieved April 18, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Oregon 2010 Primary Results: Superintendent of Public Instruction". The Oregonian. May 18, 2010. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Superintendent of Public Instruction - Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  4. ^ "State Treasurer - Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved May 20, 2010. 
  5. ^ "State Treasurer - Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 5, 2010. 
  6. ^ a b Elections Division (January 2010). "Statistical Summary - 2010 January Special Election". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  7. ^ Elections Division (May 2010). "May 18, 2010 Primary Election Abstracts of Votes - State Measure No. 68". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  8. ^ a b Elections Division (May 2010). "Statistical Summary - 2010 Primary Election". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  9. ^ Elections Division (May 2010). "May 18, 2010 Primary Election Abstracts of Votes - State Measure No. 69". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2010-07-29. 
  10. ^ Elections Division (2010-08-02). "Measure Numbers Assigned for 2010 General Election Measures". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved 2010-08-02. 
  11. ^ Elections Division. "November 2, 2010, General Election Abstracts of Votes STATE MEASURE NO. 70". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 7, 2012. 
  12. ^ Elections Division. "November 2, 2010, General Election Abstracts of Votes STATE MEASURE NO. 71". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 7, 2012. 
  13. ^ Elections Division. "State Ballot Measure 72: Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  14. ^ Elections Division. "State Ballot Measure 73: Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  15. ^ Elections Division. "State Ballot Measure 74: Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  16. ^ Elections Division. "State Ballot Measure 75: Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 
  17. ^ Elections Division. "State Ballot Measure 76: Unofficial Results". Oregon Secretary of State. Retrieved November 4, 2010. 

External links[edit]