Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders (Scouts-in-Exile)

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Организация Российских Юных Разведчиков
Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders.svg
Founded November 14 and November 15, 1945
 Scouting portal

The Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders (Организация Российских Юных Разведчиков, abbreviated as ORYuR/ОРЮР, registered in the United States as St. George's Pathfinders of America) is one of the two large Russian Scouting in Exile movements. This organization has historically drawn the conservative side of the spectrum of Russians in exile.

History[edit]

Russian Scouting in exile 1917-1945[edit]

After the Russian Revolution of 1917, the organization Русский Скаут went into exile, and continued in many countries where fleeing White Russian émigrés settled, establishing groups in France, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Estonia, Lithuania, Latvia, Finland, Poland, Romania, Hungary, Belgium, Argentina, Chile, Canada, Australia, United States and for a short time also in the Netherlands and Surinam.[1][2] A much larger mass of Russian Scouts moved through Vladivostok to the east into Manchuria and south into China and Hong Kong.[1][2][3]

An ORYuR Scout handbook

The most important leader of Russian Scouting in exile was Oleg Pantyukhov. Oleg Pantyukhov, Chief Scout of Russia, first went to Turkey and resided later in France and then moved to the United States, where large troops of Russian Scouts were established in cities such as San Francisco, Burlingame, California, Los Angeles, etc. He returned to Nice, France where he died. He served as Chief Scout of N.O.R.S. until his death on October 25, 1973 and was involved in Russian Scouting since 1908/1909.

National Organization of Russian Scouts was recognized as a Member of the World Organization of the Scout Movement, in exile, from 1922[4] to 1945.[5] The Headquarters was first in Constantinople,[6] later in Brussels[1] and Belgrade.[7]

DP-Scouts and the founding of ORYuR[edit]

After World War II Russian Scout and Guide troops were founded in Displaced Persons camps in i.e. in Austria and West Germany. In Monchehof Displaced Persons Camp the Russian Scouts provided postal delivery and issued Scout stamps.[8] So from November 14 to November 15, 1945 a Conference of Russian DP-Scout leaders took place in Munich and the Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders (ORYuR) was founded.[9][10] Among the founders were Boris Borisovitsch Martino.[11] Oleg Pantyukhov was appointed to the Chief Scout of the Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders and so he was at this time the Chief Scout of both Russian Scouts-in-exile associations. He tried to unite the associations, but it failed and so he resigned as Chief Scout from ORYuR in 1957.[12] As neither organization was created ex nihilo, they may both be considered legitimate successors to the Русский Скаут heritage.

ORYuR became a member of the Displaced Persons Scout Division from 1947 to 1950.[13]

ORYuR today[edit]

A parade at the 2004 jamboree

There are groups of this Scout association in Germany,[11] Argentina,[14] the United States[15] and other countries in Europe, the Americas and Australia.[11]

In Germany the name "Russische St. Georgs-Pfadfinder" (Russian St. George's Scouts) is sometimes used.[16][17]

Together with N.O.R.S. ORYuR helped to restart Scouting in Russia and other parts of the former USSR.[18] So there are today groups of ORYuR in Russia[11][19] and Lithuania.[20]

Organization of Russian Young Pathfinders.png

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 85. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  2. ^ a b Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 11. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  3. ^ "NATIONAL ORGANISATION OF RUSSIAN SCOUTS NORS in China, 1922-1947". PineTree.web. Retrieved 2008-10-24. 
  4. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. pp. 84–85. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  5. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 93. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  6. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 83. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  7. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 86. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  8. ^ R. Polchaninoff. "Russian DP Camp Scout Mail". SOSSI. Retrieved 2008-11-05. 
  9. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. pp. 91–92. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  10. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. pp. 49–50. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Vereinigung der russischen jungen Pfadfinder (Orur)" (in German). Vereinigung der russischen jungen Pfadfinder (Orur). Retrieved 2008-11-06. 
  12. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 50. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  13. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 96. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  14. ^ "BARAK" (in Russian). BARAK/ORUR. Retrieved 2008-11-06. 
  15. ^ "Druzhina "Putivl", Washington, DC, USA". St. George's Pathfinders of America/ORUR. Retrieved 2008-11-05. 
  16. ^ Robert Weimer (July 30, 2008). "Traditionspflege ganz orthodox". Allgemeine Zeitung Bad Kreuznach (in German-). 
  17. ^ "Im Zeltlager wird nur russisch gesprochen". SCOUTING-Unabhängige Zeitschrift für Pfadfinderinnen und Pfadfinder (in German). 3/2006: 36. 2006. 
  18. ^ "NATIONAL ORGANISATION OF RUSSIAN SCOUTS-Growth of Russian Scouting, Revolution and Exile". PineTree.web. Retrieved 2008-11-05. 
  19. ^ Kroonenberg, Piet J. (1998). The Undaunted- The Survival and Revival of Scouting in Central and Eastern Europe. Geneva: Oriole International Publications. p. 70. ISBN 2-88052-003-7. 
  20. ^ "Visaginas Scouts‘ Organization". Visaginas Scouts‘ Organization. Retrieved 2008-11-06.