Orsa-class torpedo boat

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RM Pegaso at home.jpg
Torpedo boat Pegaso
Class overview
Operators:  Regia Marina
 Marina Militare
In commission: 1936–1964
Completed: 4
Lost: 2
General characteristics [1]
Type: Torpedo boat
Displacement: 840 long tons (850 t) standard
1,575 long tons (1,600 t) full load
Length: 82.5 m (270 ft 8 in)
Beam: 9.69 m (31 ft 9 in)
Draught: 3.74 m (12 ft 3 in)
Propulsion: 2 shaft steam turbines
2 boilers
16,000 hp (11,900 kW)
Speed: 28 knots (32 mph; 52 km/h)
Complement: 116
Armament: • 2 × 100 mm (3.9 in) guns
• 10 × 20 mm (0.79 in) anti-aircraft guns
• 8 × 13.2 mm (0.52 in) AA machine guns
• 4 × 450 mm (18 in) torpedo tubes[2]
• 6 × depth charge throwers

The Orsa class were a group of large torpedo boats or destroyer escorts built for the Italian Navy in the late 1930s. They were an enlarged version of the Spica-class torpedo boat, with more endurance and a greater depth charge load but less powerful machinery and a lighter gun armament. The surviving pair were rebuilt as anti-submarine frigates in the 1950s.

Ships[edit]

Ship builder Launched Operational History
Pegaso BS Napoletani 8 December 1936 Sank British submarines HMS Upholder and HMS Thorn. She was part of the screen of destroyers and torpedo boats escorting a four-freighter convoy to Tripoli on 26 May 1941,[3] when two Blenheim bombers were shot down.[4] She also took part in the shooting down of a Beaufort bomber and a Beaufighter while escorting another convoy on 21 August 1942.[5] Scuttled 11 September 1943
Procione BS Napoletani 31 January 1937 Scuttled 11 September 1943
Orione CNR Palermo 21 April 1937 Survived the war and served in the post-war Marina Militare. Decommissioned 1964
Orsa CNR Palermo 21 March 1937 Survived the war and served in the post-war Marina Militare. Decommissioned 1964

References[edit]

  1. ^ Conway's All the World's Fighting ships 1922-1946
  2. ^ Marina Militare
  3. ^ Naval Events, May 1941, Part 2 of 2
  4. ^ Shores, Cull & Malizia, p. 223
  5. ^ Shores, Cull & Malizia (1991).Malta: The Spitfire Year 1942. Grub Street, p. 524. ISBN 0-948817-16-X