Orthodox psychotherapy

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Orthodox psychotherapy refers to "the process of spiritual growth and development" as used in the Eastern Orthodox Church.[1] In this context, it is a theological term rather than medical or psychological term.[2] The term is not limited to traditional psychotherapy used to treat psychological problems, but it rather refers to all people by dealing with their core existential issues.[3][4][5] Metropolitan Hierotheos introduced the phrase through his homonymous book.[1][6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rogers, F. Gregory (December 22, 2002). "Spiritual direction in the Orthodox Christian tradition". Journal of Psychology and Theology. Retrieved 2012-02-23. 
  2. ^ Lapin, Alexander (April–July 2007). "What is "psychotherapy" in context of the Orthodox Christianity?". World Cultural Psychiatry Research Review 2 (2/3): 83. ISSN 1932-6270. Retrieved 2012-02-23. 
  3. ^ Johnson, Christopher D. L (2010). The Globalization of Hesychasm and the Jesus Prayer: Contesting Contemplation. Continuum International Publishing Group. p. 170. ISBN 978-1-4411-2547-7. Retrieved 2012-02-23. 
  4. ^ Archbishop Chrysostomos (2006). A Guide to Orthodox Psychotherapy: The Science, Theology and Spiritual Practice Behind it and Its Clinical Applications. University Press of America. ISBN 978-0-7618-3602-5. [page needed]
  5. ^ Nelson, James M. Psychology, Religion, and Spirituality. p. 52. ISBN 978-0-387-87572-9. 
  6. ^ http://www.uocc.ca/en-ca/faith/articles/faithandspirituality/psychotherapy.asp Ukrainian Orthodox Church Website, Article "Orthodox Psychotherapy"
  7. ^ "The Orthodox Vision", Official newsletter of the Orthdox Church in America(OCA),Diocese of the West,Volume 9, Number 2, p. 1, Winter 2003