Orthodox wall calendar

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Orthodox Calendar is the title of a wall calendar and videos first published in 2012, featuring nude and semi-nude photographs of members of the Orthodox Church. The calendar is the brainchild of a group composed mostly of Orthodox eastern Europeans[1] of the former region. The primary goal was to demonstrate that Orthodox believers do not all fit the backward, hidebound stereotype portrayed in the press but rather are regular people with passions, preferences, interests and desires. At the same time, the calendar takes an ironic approach to the Eastern Orthodox Church itself, which in recent years has been embroiled in scandals.

The calendar and videos have 12 nude and semi-nude photos of persons portrayed as Orthodox priests and their guests. The style – with bold colors, homoerotic undertones and gentle ironic humor – appears to be inspired in part by the works of David LaChapelle and Pierre & Gilles. Photo sessions and casting took place in the predominantly Orthodox area of Eastern Europe.

Reception[edit]

Launched in September 2012, the first edition of The Orthodox Calendar has met with positive reception over the world, and in particular after it was covered by the international online newspaper Huffington Post.[2] The creative and gay communities, as well as women, have been supportive and among the biggest buyers.

Despite several attempts by detractors to have the calendar and videos banned from online video channels and social media, their online presence is growing and has captured worldwide[3] interest.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Civilization in Eastern Europe: Byzantium and Orthodox Europe". Wps.ablongman.com. Retrieved 2013-10-04. 
  2. ^ Wong, Curtis (2012-12-27). "'Romanian Orthodox Priests' Produce Steamy Gay 2013 Calendar (PHOTOS)". Huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2013-10-04. 
  3. ^ "What the Press says about us". Orthodox Calendar. Retrieved 2013-10-04. 

External links[edit]