Orthodoxy in Croatia

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Orthodox monastery Krka

Eastern Orthodoxy is the second largest religion in Croatia. Over 190,000 people, forming 4.44% of the total Croatian population, are Orthodox Christians.

In Croatia the prime Orthodox Church is the Serbian Orthodox Church which gathers most of the Eastern Orthodox faithful. Other major denominations are the Bulgarian Orthodox Church and the Macedonian Orthodox Church. These three churches are recognized by the state.[1] [2] In Croatia there are also adherents to the Montenegrin Orthodox Church. During World War 2, the Croatian Orthodox Church also existed.

Statistics[edit]

The published data from the 2011 Croatian census included a crosstab of ethnicity and religion which showed that a total of 190,143 Orthodox believers (4.44% of the total population) was divided between the following ethnic groups:[3]

  • 159,530 Orthodox Serbs
  • 16,647 Orthodox Croats
  • 2,401 Orthodox Macedonians
  • 2,187 Orthodox by nationality
  • 2,084 Orthodox believers of undeclared nationality
  • 1,822 Orthodox Montenegrins
  • 816 Orthodox believers of other nationalities
  • 729 Orthodox Russians
  • 341 Orthodox Ukrainians
  • 293 Orthodox Bosniaks
  • 158 Orthodox Bulgarians
  • 157 Orthodox believers of unknown nationality
  • 147 Orthodox Romanians
  • 124 Orthodox believers of regional affiliation
  • other individual ethnicities (under 100 people each)

Serb Orthodoxy[edit]

Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Lord in Zagreb
Main article: Serb Orthodox Church

This church gathers its faithful among the Serbs of Croatia. In Croatia it is organized into the following eparchies:[1]

Major Serb Orthodox sites include the monasteries:

and the churches:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Ugovor između Vlade Republike Hrvatske i Srpske pravoslavne crkve u Hrvatskoj o pitanjima od zajedničkog interesa". Narodne novine - Službeni list Republike Hrvatske NN196/03 (in Croatian). Narodne novine. December 15, 2003. Retrieved February 16, 2010. 
  2. ^ "Ugovor između Vlade Republike Hrvatske i Bugarske pravoslavne crkve u Hrvatskoj, Hrvatske starokatoličke crkve i Makedonske pravoslavne crkve u Hrvatskoj". Narodne novine - Službeni list Republike Hrvatske NN196/03 (in Croatian). Narodne novine. December 15, 2003. Retrieved February 16, 2010. 
  3. ^ "4. Population by ethnicity and religion". Census of Population, Households and Dwellings 2011. Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics. December 2012. Retrieved 2012-12-17.