Oscar Casares

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Oscar Casares
Born (1964-05-07) May 7, 1964 (age 50)
Brownsville, Texas
Occupation Author, Professor of Creative Writing
Language English
Nationality American
Ethnicity Mexican-American

Oscar Casares (born May 7, 1964) is an American writer and an associate professor of creative writing.[1] He is the author of Brownsville: Stories and Amigoland. Casares teaches at the University of Texas at Austin where he is director of the Creative Writing Program.[2]

Honors[edit]

  • National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship (2006)
  • James A. Michener Award, Copernicus Society of America, Iowa Writers' Workshop (2002)[3]
  • Dobie Paisano Fellowship, Texas Institute of Letters, University of Texas (2002)[4]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Selected Essays[edit]

  • "Imaginary Friends," Texas Monthly, December 2010[5]
  • "The Departed," Texas Monthly, April 2010[6]
  • "You Must Read This: The Burning Plain," National Public Radio, October 2009[7]
  • "Grass Roots," Texas Monthly, December 2008[8]
  • "Ready for Some Futbol?", Texas Monthly, November 2006[9]
  • "In the Year 1974", Texas Monthly, March 2005 [10]
  • "Crossing the Border Without Losing Your Past," New York Times, September 2003[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Smith, Evan (December 23, 2004). "Novelist Oscar Casares". Texas Monthly. 
  2. ^ "Distinguished alumni announced". The Brownsville Herald. August 11, 2011. 
  3. ^ Wizda Vane, Sharyn (March 2, 2003). "The stories of his life". Austin American-Statesman. 
  4. ^ Badgley, Shawn (June 14, 2002). "The 2002-03 Dobie Paisano Fellows". Austin Chronicle. 
  5. ^ Casares, Oscar (December 2010). "Imaginary Friends". Texas Monthly. 
  6. ^ Casares, Oscar (April 2010). "The Departed". Texas Monthly. 
  7. ^ Casares, Oscar (October 15, 2009). "A Wild, 'Burning' Journey Back To Old Mexico". NPR. Retrieved 3 October 2011. 
  8. ^ Casares, Oscar (December 2008). "Grass Roots". Texas Monthly. 
  9. ^ Oscar, Casares (November 2006). "Ready for some futbol?". Texas Monthly (November 2006): 130–142. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  10. ^ Casares, Oscar. "In the year 1974". Texas Monthly. Retrieved 22 September 2011. 
  11. ^ Casares, Oscar (September 16, 2003). "Crossing the Border Without Losing the Past". New York Times. Retrieved 3 October 2011.