Otoe, Nebraska

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Otoe, Nebraska
Village
Downtown Otoe.
Downtown Otoe.
Location of Otoe, Nebraska
Location of Otoe, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°43′29″N 96°7′14″W / 40.72472°N 96.12056°W / 40.72472; -96.12056Coordinates: 40°43′29″N 96°7′14″W / 40.72472°N 96.12056°W / 40.72472; -96.12056
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Otoe
Area[1]
 • Total 0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2)
 • Land 0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,112 ft (339 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 171
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 171
 • Density 1,068.8/sq mi (412.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 68417
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-37630
GNIS feature ID 0831917[4]

Otoe is a village in Otoe County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 171 at the 2010 census.

History[edit]

The village was established in 1880 on the proposed line of the Missouri Pacific Railroad from Kansas City to Omaha. The town was originally named Berlin; many of the early inhabitants were German Lutherans. In 1896, when the population reached 200, the town incorporated. It survived and rebuilt after a tornado in 1913 destroyed most of its businesses.[5][6]

The entry of the United States into World War I was followed by anti-German sentiment, which extended to a town that bore the name of Germany's capital. A 1918 series of fires that destroyed a block of the town's main street was attributed to anti-German crusaders. In October 1918, less than a month before the war's end, the town's name was changed to its current Otoe.[6] Berlin Precinct was left unchanged, however.[7]

Passenger rail service to Otoe was discontinued in 1932; despite this setback, the town continued to grow, reaching its maximum historical population of 298 in the 1940 census. Following World War II, the population began to decline. In 1958, the high school was closed; in the 1960s, the railroad line through Otoe was abandoned.[5][6]

Geography[edit]

Otoe is located at 40°43′29″N 96°7′14″W / 40.72472°N 96.12056°W / 40.72472; -96.12056 (40.724587, -96.120554).[8]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.16 square miles (0.41 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 150
1910 196 30.7%
1920 261 33.2%
1930 263 0.8%
1940 298 13.3%
1950 230 −22.8%
1960 225 −2.2%
1970 204 −9.3%
1980 197 −3.4%
1990 196 −0.5%
2000 217 10.7%
2010 171 −21.2%
Est. 2012 171 0.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[9]
2012 Estimate[10]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 171 people, 67 households, and 45 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,068.8 inhabitants per square mile (412.7/km2). There were 80 housing units at an average density of 500.0 per square mile (193.1/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.3% White, 1.2% Native American, 2.3% from other races, and 1.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.3% of the population.

There were 67 households of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.8% were married couples living together, 13.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 9.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.8% were non-families. 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.13.

The median age in the village was 36.6 years. 25.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 19.2% were from 25 to 44; 26.8% were from 45 to 64; and 18.1% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 55.6% male and 44.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census of 2000, there were 217 people, 83 households, and 60 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,372.8 people per square mile (523.7/km²). There were 94 housing units at an average density of 594.6 per square mile (226.8/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 99.54% White, and 0.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.46% of the population.

There were 83 households out of which 37.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.2% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.7% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the village the population was spread out with 31.8% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 26.3% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 18.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 110.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.7 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $33,125, and the median income for a family was $36,875. Males had a median income of $34,375 versus $20,833 for females. The per capita income for the village was $12,461. None of the families and 2.8% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 4.0% of those over 64.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ a b Kay, John, Lonnie Dickson, Robert Kay, and Kathleen Fimple. "Nebraska Historic Buildings Survey—Reconnaissance Survey Final Report of Otoe County, Nebraska". Nebraska State Historical Society. Retrieved 2012-04-18.
  6. ^ a b c Paap, Verena, and Loris Roettger. "Otoe—Otoe County". Nebraska... Our Towns. Retrieved 2012-04-18.
  7. ^ Fitzpatrick, Lillian L. (1960). Nebraska Place-Names. University of Nebraska Press. p. 109. ISBN 0-8032-5060-6.  A 1925 edition is available for download at University of Nebraska—Lincoln Digital Commons.
  8. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  9. ^ United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing". Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Retrieved October 16, 2013.