Otto Dohrenwend

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Otto E. Dohrenwend (1899–1989) was an investment banker from Scarsdale, New York, best known for his conservative political activism during the 1950s.

As chairman of the Scarsdale Citizens Committee, better known as the Committee of Ten, during the 1950s and 1960s, he challenged what he called Communist influence in the Scarsdale public schools.[1][2] An investigation by the Scarsdale Town Club later rejected these claims.[3] He later drew national attention when challenging the rights of supporters of the Freedom Riders to hold a fund-raising benefit in a public high school auditorium.[4]

Dohrenwend was a senior partner in the brokerage firm of Baker, Weeks & Harden from 1936 to 1972. He also served as a member of the national American Legion's Americanism Committee and on the board of trustees of Manhattanville College in Purchase, New York.[5]

He was married to the former Constance Wilckes.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Connor, Carol A. "A Sort of Utopia: Scarsdale, 1891-1981," 1983
  2. ^ Questions School Board: Scarsdale Committee Asks Policy on Teaching of Americanism, The New York Times, Oct. 14, 1949, P. 29
  3. ^ Scarsdale Reports No Reds in Schools, The New York Times, April 24, 1953
  4. ^ Folsom, Merrill. Scarsdale Show Cleared in Court, The New York Times March 17, 1962, Page 27
  5. ^ Otto Dohrenwend, 90, Investment Broker, The New York Times, October 21, 1989
  6. ^ Otto Dohrenwend, 90, Investment Broker, The New York Times, October 21, 1989