Our Man Higgins

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Our Man Higgins
Our man higgins 1962.JPG
Stanley Holloway and Regina Groves (1962)
Genre Sitcom
Created by Paul Harrison
Starring Stanley Holloway
Audrey Totter
Frank Maxwell
Ricky Kelman
K.C. Butts
Regina Groves
Theme music composer Frank De Vol
Composer(s) Frank DeVol
Country of origin United States
Original language(s) English
No. of seasons 1
No. of episodes 34
Production
Producer(s) Paul Harrison
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 24 mins.
Production company(s) First Company of Writers
Screen Gems
Distributor Columbia TriStar Domestic Television
Sony Pictures Television
Broadcast
Original channel ABC
Picture format Black-and-white
Audio format Monaural
Original run October 3, 1962 (1962-10-03) – May 17, 1963 (1963-05-17)

Our Man Higgins is an American situation comedy that aired on ABC from October 3, 1962, to May 17, 1963.

Synopsis[edit]

Our Man Higgins follows the adventures of an English butler portrayed by Stanley Holloway, who is inherited by a suburban American family, resulting in a cultural clash that grows into a cultural blending.

Higgins answers to Duncan and Alice MacRoberts, played by Frank Maxwell and Audrey Totter. Joining Holloway, Maxwell and Totter were Ricky Kelman, K.C. Butts, and Regina Groves, who portrayed the children Tommy, Dinghy, and Joanie MacRoberts, respectively.[1]

It's Higgins, Sir was previously a 13-episode NBC radio comedy series in 1951, created and produced by Paul Harrison, and written by Harrison and Rik Vollaerts. Harry McNaughton read the starring role of Higgins in that series, broadcast on Tuesdays at 9 P.M. (as Bob Hope's summer replacement). [2]

Guest stars[edit]

Scheduling[edit]

Our Man Higgins, co-sponsored by General Motors' Pontiac division and American Tobacco, aired on ABC at 9:30 P.M. Eastern on Wednesdays opposite The Dick Van Dyke Show on CBS and the second half of Perry Como's Kraft Music Hall on NBC. Higgins followed another one-year ABC series Going My Way, starring Gene Kelly, Dick York, and Leo G. Carroll, in a television version of the 1944 Bing Crosby film.[3]

References[edit]

External links[edit]