List of cuisines

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This is a list of cuisines. A cuisine is a specific set of cooking traditions and practices, often associated with a specific culture or region. Each cuisine involves food preparation in a particular style, of food and drink of particular types, to produce individually consumed items or distinct meals. A cuisine is frequently named after the region or place where it originated. A cuisine is primarily influenced by the ingredients that are available locally or through trade. Religious food laws can also exercise a strong influence on such culinary practices.

Global cuisine[edit]

  • Global cuisine – a cuisine that is practiced around the world. A cuisine is a characteristic style of cooking practices and traditions,[1] often associated with a specific region, country[2] or culture. To become a global cuisine, a local, regional or national cuisine must spread around the world; it's food served world-wide.

Regional and national cuisines[edit]

  • Regional cuisine is based upon national, state or local regions.[3] Regional cuisines may vary based upon food availability and trade, varying climates, cooking traditions and practices, and cultural differences.[4] One noteworthy definition is based upon traditional cuisine: "A traditional cuisine is a coherent tradition of food preparation that rises from the daily lives and kitchens of a people over an extended period in a specific region of a country, or a specific country, and which, when localized, has notable distinctions from the cuisine of the country as a whole."[4]

African cuisine[edit]

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  • African cuisine – the various cuisines of Africa use a combination of locally available fruits, cereal grains and vegetables, as well as milk and meat products. In some parts of the continent, the traditional diet features a preponderance of milk, curd and whey products. In much of tropical Africa, however, cow's milk is rare and cannot be produced locally (owing to various diseases that affect livestock). The continent's diverse demographic makeup is reflected in the many different eating and drinking habits, dishes, and preparation techniques of its manifold populations.[5]

Asian cuisine[edit]

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  • Asian cuisine - Ingredients common to many cultures in the east and Southeast regions of the continent include rice, ginger, garlic, sesame seeds, chilies, dried onions, soy, and tofu. Stir frying, steaming, and deep frying are common cooking methods. While rice is common to most Asian cuisines, different varieties are popular in the various regions; Basmati rice is popular in the subcontinent, Jasmine is often found across the southeast, while long-grain rice is popular in China and short-grain in Japan and Korea.[6] Curry is also a common dish found in southern and eastern Asia, however they are not as popular in eastern cuisines. Those curry dishes with origins in India and other South Asian countries usually have a yogurt base while Southeastern and Eastern curries generally use coconut milk as their foundation.[7]

European cuisine[edit]

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Oceanian cuisine[edit]

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Cuisines of the Americas[edit]

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Cuisine styles[edit]

A Jacques Lameloise (a 3 star Michelin Guide chef) nouvelle cuisine presentation

Ethnic and religious cuisines[edit]

Ohaw, traditional Ainu soup

Historical cuisines[edit]

Ancient Egyptian cuisine – a depiction of the royal bakery from an engraving in the tomb of Ramesses III in the Valley of the Kings. There are many types of loaves, including ones that are shaped like animals. 20th dynasty.
Africa
Americas
Asia
Europe

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cuisine (definition). Thefreedictionary.com. Accessed June 2011.
  2. ^ "Cuisine (definition)". Oxford Dictionaries. Retrieved 2013-05-26. 
  3. ^ "Region." (Definition). Merriam-Webster dictionary. Accessed June 2011.
  4. ^ a b "The American Food Revolutions: Cuisines in America." Eldrbarry.net. Accessed June 2011.
  5. ^ Bea Sandler (1993). The African Cookbook. Diane and Leo Dillon (Illust.). Carol Publishing Group. ISBN 0-8065-1398-5. Retrieved 2008-12-18. 
  6. ^ "The flavors of Asia". Quaker Oats Company. Retrieved 2008-12-19. [dead link]
  7. ^ "Cuisine Areas Of Asia". Kraft Foods (Australia). 2007. Retrieved 2008-12-20. 
  8. ^ Leung Man-tao (12 February 2007), "Eating and Cultural Stereotypes", Eat and Travel Weekly, no. 312, p. 76. Hong Kong
  9. ^ "Native American Food." (Project for Anthropology 85A course). University of California Irvine. Accessed July 2011.

External links[edit]