Outline of self

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The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to the self.

Selfindividual person, from his or her own perspective. To you, self is you. To a different person, self is that person.

Life stages/events[edit]

Stages of life[edit]

1. Infancy
2. Childhood
3. Adolescence
4. Adulthood
5. Middle age
6. Old age

Major life events[edit]

1. Birth
2. Education
3. Graduation
4. Coming of age
5. Employment
6. Marriage
7. Parenthood
8. Retirement
9. Death

Individual rights[edit]

Individual rights – much of the western world values the concept of individual rights. These rights vary from culture to culture, and by very definition, from person to person, and appear mainly in individualist societies. In considering the self, the most intimate legal relation would be what is codified as 'sui juris', or what laws have a purposed place so far as they are derived of the self. In such cultures, it is generally considered that each and every individual has the following rights:

  • security rights – protect people against crimes such as murder, massacre, torture and rape
  • bodily and property rights – encompass "ownership" of your own body and choosing what to do with it, as well as the fruits of the labour that spring forth from using your own body. ("Every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has a right to, but himself," per John Locke, Second Treatise on Civil Government)
  • liberty rights of the Classical era – protect freedoms in areas such as belief and religion, association, assembling, movement, and other self-determination (as an individual person), privacy from government and others, and freedoms from other paternalist meddling generally, whether by governments or others; also encompasses security, bodily and property, political, and due process rights, many group rights, some welfare rights, and (especially outside of the USA in the Classical era) equality rights, as all of those categories appear in this list
  • political rights – protect the liberty to participate in politics by expressing themselves, protesting, voting and serving in public office
  • due process rights – protect against abuses of the legal system such as imprisonment without trial, secret trials and excessive punishments; often overlaps with the bodily rights, listed above
  • equality rights – guarantee equal citizenship, equality before the law and nondiscrimination in regards to one's eligibility for all of the other rights in this list
  • welfare rights (also known as economic or social rights) – require the provision of education and protections against severe poverty and starvation; generally an expansion of positive liberties
  • group rights – provide protection for groups against ethnic genocide, and self-determination (as a group) and the ownership by countries of their national territories and resources; may overlap with the bodily and property rights, and Social equality rights, listed above

Components of self[edit]

Personality traits[edit]

Main articles: Big Five personality traits and Trait theory

Harmful traits and practices[edit]

Personal values[edit]

Virtues[edit]

Virtuecharacteristic of a person which supports individual moral excellence and collective well being. Such characteristics are valued as a principle and recognized as a good way to be. This list is necessarily incomplete.

Vices[edit]

Main articles: Vice and Sufism
  • Anger – emotional response related to one's psychological interpretation of having been threatened. Often it indicates when one's basic boundaries are violated. Some have a learned tendency to react to anger through retaliation. Anger may be utilized effectively when utilized to set boundaries or escape from dangerous situations.
  • Jealousy – emotion, and the word typically refers to the negative thoughts and feelings of insecurity, fear, and anxiety over an anticipated loss of something of great personal value, particularly in reference to a human connection. Jealousy often consists of a combination of emotions such as anger, resentment, inadequacy, helplessness and disgust.
  • Laziness – disinclination to activity or exertion despite having the ability to do so. It is often used as a pejorative; related terms for a person seen to be lazy include couch potato, slacker, and bludger.
  • Seven Deadly Sins
    1. Lust – emotion or feeling of intense desire in the body. The lust can take any form such as the lust for knowledge, the lust for sex or the lust for power. It can take such mundane forms as the lust for food as distinct from the need for food.
    2. Gluttony – over-indulgence and over-consumption of food, drink, or wealth items to the point of extravagance or waste. In some Christian denominations, it is considered one of the seven deadly sins—a misplaced desire of food or its withholding from the needy.
    3. Greed – also known as avarice, cupidity, or covetousness, is the inordinate desire to possess wealth, goods, or objects of abstract value with the intention to keep it for one's self, far beyond the dictates of basic survival and comfort. It is applied to a markedly high desire for and pursuit of wealth, status, and power. See also, Greed (deadly sin).
    4. Sloth – spiritual or emotional apathy, neglecting what God has spoken, and being physically and emotionally inactive. It can also be either an outright refusal or merely a carelessness in the performance of one's obligations, especially spiritual, moral or legal obligations. Sloth can also indicate a wasting due to lack of use, concerning a person, place, thing, skill, or intangible ideal that would require maintenance, refinement, or support to continue to exist.
    5. Wrath – also known as "rage", may be described as inordinate and uncontrolled feelings of hatred and anger. Wrath, in its purest form, presents with self-destructiveness, violence, and hate that may provoke feuds that can go on for centuries. Wrath may persist long after the person who did another a grievous wrong is dead. Feelings of anger can manifest in different ways, including impatience, revenge, and self-destructive behavior, such as drug abuse or suicide.
    6. Envy – emotion which "occurs when a person lacks another's superior quality, achievement, or possession and either desires it or wishes that the other lacked it"
    7. Pride – inflated sense of one's personal status or accomplishments, often used synonymously with hubris.
  • Vanity – excessive belief in one's own abilities or attractiveness to others.

Self-actualization[edit]

Self-actualization

Self management[edit]

Self-management

Self-preservation and self-maintenance[edit]

Other personal concepts[edit]

See also[edit]

External links[edit]