Ouyen

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Ouyen
Victoria
Queen Bee Roadhouse Ouyen.jpg
The Queen Bee Roadhouse
Ouyen is located in Rural City of Mildura
Ouyen
Ouyen
Coordinates 35°04′0″S 142°19′0″E / 35.06667°S 142.31667°E / -35.06667; 142.31667Coordinates: 35°04′0″S 142°19′0″E / 35.06667°S 142.31667°E / -35.06667; 142.31667
Population 1,061 (2006 census)[1]
Established 1906
Postcode(s) 3490
Elevation 50 m (164 ft)
Location
LGA(s) Rural City of Mildura
State electorate(s) Mildura
Federal Division(s) Mallee
Mean max temp Mean min temp Annual rainfall
23.6 °C
74 °F
9.6 °C
49 °F
319.6 mm
12.6 in
Localities around Ouyen:
Murray-Sunset Murray-Sunset Hattah
Walpeup Ouyen Kulwin
Patchewollock Tempy Mittyack

Ouyen /ˈjən/[2] is a town in Victoria, Australia, located in the Rural City of Mildura at the junction of the Calder Highway and Mallee Highway, 105 kilometres (65 mi)[3] south of Mildura and 441 km (274 mi)[4] north-west of Melbourne. At the 2006 census the town had a population of 1,061.[1]

History[edit]

The area was first occupied by the Wergaia Aborigines. The name is believed to be derived from the Wergaia word 'wuya-wuya', which some believe means 'pink-eared duck', whilst others claim it means 'ghost waterhole'.[5]

The town was established around the Ouyen railway station, built in 1906 on the Mildura Line.The Post Office opened on 22 October 1907[6] It is also the junction for a railway line west parallel to the Mallee Highway. This line is in poor condition and used only for collecting grain from silos in small towns between Ouyen and the South Australian border, as the Victorian part is broad gauge, but the line from Pinnaroo to Tailem Bend has been converted to standard gauge, with no facility for handling the break of gauge. The line was used for interstate freight and The Overland[citation needed] as a broad gauge connection while the main Melbourne to Adelaide line (through Bordertown) was being converted from broad to standard gauge in 1995.

Property became available for purchase in 1910, and much of it was cleared for sheep grazing, and crops of wheat and oats.

Present[edit]

Ouyen is the commercial and transport centre for the surrounding grain farming region. Trucks arrive at harvest time to transport grain to Portland or Adelaide, South Australia for shipping, or to flour mills for processing.

Ouyen has an Australian rules football team Ouyen United (Ouyen Rovers (Kiamal and Tiega) plus TGP(for Tempy, Gorya, Patchewollock) competing in the Mallee Football League.

Golfers play at the course of the Ouyen Golf Club on Daker Street.[7] The clubhouse also houses the Ouyen Tennis Club.

The area of the locality contains a number of previous localities which existed when the population was larger, on the Mallee Highway Galah about 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) to the west which had a post office open from 1911 (when the railway arrived) until 1976, Galah North34°59′S 142°10′E / 34.983°S 142.167°E / -34.983; 142.167 (Galah North) with a post office from 1925 until 1927 and Tiega 35°05′S 142°13′E / 35.083°S 142.217°E / -35.083; 142.217 (Tiega) with a post office from 1911 until 1961; to the southwest Timberoo and Timberoo South with a post office from 1913 until 1933; in the north Wymlet with a post office from 1912 until 1963, Trinita with a post office from 1925 until 1936, Kiamal with a post office from 1917 until 1980 and Cramerton with a post office from 1924 until 1969; and in the south Boulka with a post office in 1921, Bronzewing with a post office from 1921 until 1967, Nunga with a post office from 1914 until 1967, Gypsum Siding with a post office from 1922 until 1940, Boorongie and Boorongie North.[6]

Culture[edit]

Since 1998, the Great Australian Vanilla Slice Triumph has been held in Ouyen.[8] Judging criteria include "when tasted, should reveal a custard with a creamy smooth texture and a balance of vanilla taste with a crisp, crunchy pastry topped with a smooth and shiny glaze/fondant".[9]

The town also hosts an Autumn Art Show in April and the Mallee Wildflower Festival in October and was the location for the 2003 Ouyen Raindance where 500 women danced naked in a secret location in an attempt to raise the spirits of the town suffering from a prolonged drought.[10]

The Roxy Theatre, in the main street - Oke Street; was built in 1936 and owned by Hugh Ingwersen, a local business man. The Roxy Theatre is a historically significant and unique building (being one of six of its kind left in Australia) being of a tropical style ( high ceilings and shutters which open along both sides to allow for airflow.) It closed in 1971 with the advent of video in Australia. After a major community project the Roxy re-opened in 2007 with a gala opening featuring Bill Hunter and Neil Paine as the guest speakers and 150 guests. Volunteers run the theatre on behalf of the community.[11]

The town is the site of the Big Mallee Root once a mainstay of the economy of soldier settlers of the area being collected for sale as firewood.

Ouyen has a reunion of past and present residents on the second Sunday of February each year at the Fitzroy Gardens, Melbourne. A special anniversary on Sunday,February 9, 2014 sees the 50th gathering of Ouyen and District people and their families who haved ever lived, worked, attended schools etc. at this venue.

Australian folk rock band, Weddings Parties Anything, name-checks Ouyen in their 1987 song, "Hungry Years", from their debut album, Scorn of the Women. "Hungry Years" describes itinerant fruit pickers travelling via train up to Mildura.[12]

Climate[edit]

Ouyen has a semi-arid climate with hot summers and cool winters. There is a wetter tendency in winter and early spring, which have the most precipitation days.

Climate data for Ouyen
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 46.6
(115.9)
46.8
(116.2)
41.5
(106.7)
37.0
(98.6)
29.4
(84.9)
25.0
(77)
27.0
(80.6)
29.8
(85.6)
35.6
(96.1)
40.1
(104.2)
45.8
(114.4)
45.2
(113.4)
46.8
(116.2)
Average high °C (°F) 32.3
(90.1)
31.6
(88.9)
28.4
(83.1)
23.4
(74.1)
18.8
(65.8)
15.7
(60.3)
15.1
(59.2)
17.0
(62.6)
20.2
(68.4)
23.7
(74.7)
27.3
(81.1)
30.2
(86.4)
23.6
(74.5)
Average low °C (°F) 15.4
(59.7)
15.3
(59.5)
12.9
(55.2)
9.5
(49.1)
7.2
(45)
5.1
(41.2)
4.3
(39.7)
5.1
(41.2)
6.7
(44.1)
8.8
(47.8)
11.5
(52.7)
13.7
(56.7)
9.6
(49.3)
Record low °C (°F) 6.0
(42.8)
5.9
(42.6)
4.0
(39.2)
0.0
(32)
−1.0
(30.2)
−4.8
(23.4)
−5.8
(21.6)
−1.7
(28.9)
−1.4
(29.5)
0.6
(33.1)
1.7
(35.1)
5.6
(42.1)
−5.8
(21.6)
Precipitation mm (inches) 21.1
(0.831)
23.9
(0.941)
20.2
(0.795)
21.4
(0.843)
31.6
(1.244)
29.6
(1.165)
30.8
(1.213)
32.5
(1.28)
32.3
(1.272)
34.6
(1.362)
27.9
(1.098)
25.7
(1.012)
331.7
(13.059)
Avg. precipitation days 3.0 3.2 3.3 4.4 7.2 8.7 9.8 9.8 7.9 7.0 5.2 4.0 73.5
Source: [13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Ouyen (Urban Centre/Locality)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  2. ^ Macquarie Dictionary, Fourth Edition (2005). Melbourne, The Macquarie Library Pty Ltd. ISBN 1-876429-14-3
  3. ^ "Driving directions to Mildura VIC". Google Maps Australia. Google. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  4. ^ "Driving directions to Melbourne VIC". Google Maps Australia. Google. Retrieved 31 January 2011. 
  5. ^ "Ouyen". Sydney Morning Herald. 2004-02-08. Retrieved 2007-01-06. 
  6. ^ a b Premier Postal History. "Post Office List". Retrieved 2008-04-11. 
  7. ^ Golf Select. "Ouyen". Retrieved 2009-05-11. 
  8. ^ "Premier announces "The Great Vanilla Slice Triumph"" (Press release). Premier of Victoria, Jeff Kennett. 19 July 1998. Retrieved 2007-01-06. 
  9. ^ "Travel news - The Great Australian Vanilla Slice Triumph". ninemsn. 2006-07-20. Retrieved 2007-01-06. 
  10. ^ Amy Bainbridge (3 March 2003). "OUYEN RAIN DANCE (nrn)". SA Country Hour Summary. ABC Rural. 
  11. ^ "Ouyen's Roxy Theatre". 
  12. ^ "Weddings Parties Anything – ("Hungry Years" tab)". Guitartab. 1987. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  13. ^ "Climate statistics for". Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved 20 January 2014.