Ovation

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For other uses, see Ovation (disambiguation).

The ovation (Latin: ovatio) was a form of the Roman triumph. Ovations were granted when war was not declared between enemies on the level of nations or states; when an enemy was considered basely inferior (slaves, pirates); or when the general conflict was resolved with little or no danger to the army itself.[1]

The general celebrating the ovation did not enter the city on a biga, a chariot pulled by two white horses, as generals celebrating triumphs did, but instead walked in the toga praetexta of a magistrate.

The honoured general also wore a wreath of myrtle (sacred to Venus) upon his brow, rather than the triumphal wreath of laurel. The Roman Senate did not precede the general, nor did soldiers usually participate in the procession.

Perhaps the most famous ovation in history is that which Marcus Licinius Crassus celebrated after his victory of the Third Servile War.

Ovation holders[edit]

Republic There were 23 known ovations during the Republic.[2]

Principate

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Maxfield, Valerie A. (1981). The Military Decorations of the Roman Army. Berkeley: University of California Press. pp. 104–105. ISBN 978-0-520-04499-9. Retrieved 6 October 2011. 
  2. ^ G. Rohde. Ovatio, RE XVIII, 1939, p. 1890-1903
  3. ^ Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 15:38
  4. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic pp. 19-20
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Fasti Triumphales
  6. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic pp. 69-70
  7. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 77
  8. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 92
  9. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic pp. 183-184
  10. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic pp. 273-274
  11. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 294
  12. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 324
  13. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 373
  14. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic p. 383
  15. ^ Florus, Epitome of Roman History, book 2:7-8
  16. ^ T. Robert S. Broughton. The magistrates of the Roman Republic, p. 3
  17. ^ Plutarch, The Life of Crassus 11:8
  18. ^ Lendering, Jona, Arch of Drusus
  19. ^ Suetonius, The Life of Tiberius 9
  20. ^ Alan K. Bowman, Edward Champlin, Andrew Lintott. The Cambridge Ancient History: The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C. – A.D. 69, p. 554
  21. ^ Suetonius, The Life of Caligula 49
  22. ^ Tacitus, "Annales" (xiii.32)
  23. ^ Alan K. Bowman, Edward Champlin, Andrew Lintott. The Cambridge Ancient History: The Augustan Empire, 43 B.C. – A.D. 69, p. 224
  24. ^ John Donahue, Titus Flavius Domitianus (A.D. 81-96)

See also[edit]