Oxford Township, New Jersey

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For the census-designated place within the township, see Oxford (CDP), New Jersey.
Oxford Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Oxford
Map of Oxford Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Map of Oxford Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Oxford Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Oxford Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°48′31″N 74°59′36″W / 40.80865°N 74.993421°W / 40.80865; -74.993421Coordinates: 40°48′31″N 74°59′36″W / 40.80865°N 74.993421°W / 40.80865; -74.993421[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Warren
Established May 30, 1754
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government[5]
 • Type Township
 • Mayor Jade White (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Clerk Sheila L. Oberly[4]
Area[1]
 • Total 5.887 sq mi (15.248 km2)
 • Land 5.786 sq mi (14.986 km2)
 • Water 0.101 sq mi (0.262 km2)  1.72%
Area rank 259th of 566 in state
17th of 22 in county[1]
Elevation[6] 476 ft (145 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 2,514
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 2,478
 • Rank 471st of 566 in state
18th of 22 in county[11]
 • Density 434.5/sq mi (167.8/km2)
 • Density rank 453rd of 566 in state
8th of 22 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07863[12]
Area code(s) 908[13]
FIPS code 3404155530[1][14][15]
GNIS feature ID 0882247[1][16]
Website www.oxfordtwpnj.org

Oxford Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 2,514,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 207 (+9.0%) from the 2,307 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 517 (+28.9%) from the 1,790 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] It part of the eastern-most region of the Lehigh Valley.

Oxford CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 1,090[18]) is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated community located within the township.[19][20][21]

Oxford Township was formed from portions of Greenwich Township on May 30, 1754, while the area was still part of Sussex County, and was incorporated on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of townships by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature. Mansfield Township became part of the newly formed Warren County on November 20, 1824. Over the centuries since its creation, portions of the township were taken to form Knowlton Township (February 23, 1763), Franklin Township, Harmony Township and Hope Township (all on April 8, 1839), Belvidere (April 7, 1845) and White Township (April 9, 1913).[22]

The origin of the name and the exact date of the township's creation is in dispute. One source says that the township was named after the university in England, and was formed in either 1753 or 1755,[23] but another source claims that the township was named after an early settler named John Axford, who came to settle in the area with others between 1735 and 1739, and affirms that the township's creation was in 1755.[24]

Oxford Furnace, constructed in 1741, was the third furnace in Colonial New Jersey and the first constructed at a site where iron ore was mined. Other furnaces used ore extracted from bogs in South Jersey, impure deposits called bog iron. Oxford Furnace operated the longest of any of the Colonial-era furnaces, not being "blown out" until 1884. In 1835, it was the site of America's first successful use of the hot blast in which preheated air was blown into the furnace, cutting production time. Though worn down by time, much of the site still stands. Oxford Furnace is listed on the State and the National Register of Historic Places.[25]

Geography[edit]

Oxford Township is located at 40°48′31″N 74°59′36″W / 40.80865°N 74.993421°W / 40.80865; -74.993421 (40.80865,-74.993421). According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 5.887 square miles (15.248 km2), of which, 5.786 square miles (14.986 km2) of it was land and 0.101 square miles (0.262 km2) of it (1.72%) of it was water.[1][2]

The township borders Washington, Mansfield, White and Liberty townships.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 2,470
1820 3,089 25.1%
1830 3,665 18.6%
1840 2,855 * −22.1%
1850 1,718 * −39.8%
1860 2,350 36.8%
1870 2,952 25.6%
1880 4,594 55.6%
1890 4,002 −12.9%
1900 3,695 −7.7%
1910 3,444 −6.8%
1920 2,035 * −40.9%
1930 1,723 −15.3%
1940 1,548 −10.2%
1950 1,489 −3.8%
1960 1,657 11.3%
1970 1,742 5.1%
1980 1,659 −4.8%
1990 1,790 7.9%
2000 2,307 28.9%
2010 2,514 9.0%
Est. 2013 2,478 [10][26] −1.4%
Population sources:
1810-1920[27] 1840[28]
1850-1870[29] 1850[30] 1870[31]
1880-1890[32] 1890-1910[33]
1910-1930[34] 1930-1990[35]
2000[36][37] 2010[7][8][9]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[22]

The Township's economic data (as is all of Warren County) is calculated by the US Census Bureau as part of the Allentown-Bethlehem-Easton, PA-NJ Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 2,514 people, 950 households, and 675.5 families residing in the township. The population density was 434.5 per square mile (167.8/km2). There were 1,033 housing units at an average density of 178.5 per square mile (68.9/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 94.99% (2,388) White, 1.63% (41) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.51% (38) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.68% (17) from other races, and 1.19% (30) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 3.78% (95) of the population.[7]

There were 950 households, of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.1% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.9% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.13.[7]

In the township, 24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 12.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.1 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $66,268 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,864) and the median family income was $76,186 (+/- $8,432). Males had a median income of $56,731 (+/- $11,282) versus $36,816 (+/- $5,060) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $29,948 (+/- $2,220). About 1.5% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.[38]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[14] there were 2,307 people, 886 households, and 618 families residing in the township. The population density was 388.7 inhabitants per square mile (150.0/km²). There were 938 housing units at an average density of 158.0 per square mile (61.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.58% White, 1.21% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.52% Asian, 0.65% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.47% of the population.[36][37]

There were 886 households out of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.2% were non-families. 26.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.18.[36][37]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.5% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 35.9% from 25 to 44, 20.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.0 males.[36][37]

The median income for a household in the township was $53,359, and the median income for a family was $63,750. Males had a median income of $45,667 versus $31,210 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,515. About 2.6% of families and 4.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.[36][37]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Oxford Township is governed under the Township form of government with a three-member Township Committee. The governing body is elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[5] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another to serve as Deputy Mayor.

As of 2013, members of the Oxford Township Committee are Mayor John D. Ort (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2014; term as mayor ends 2013), Deputy Mayor Keith Gibbons (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2013) and Jade M. White (D, 2015).[4][39][40][41][42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Oxford Township is located in the 5th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[8][44][45] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Oxford Township had been in the 23rd state legislative district.[46]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[47] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[48][49] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[50][51]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Alison Littell McHose (R, Franklin) and Parker Space (R, Wantage Township).[52][53] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[54] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[55]

Warren County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose three members are chosen at-large on a staggered basis in partisan elections with one seat coming up for election each year as part of the November general election. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects one of its members to serve as Freeholder Director and other as Deputy Director. As of 2014, Warren County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Edward J. Smith (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2015), Freeholder Deputy Director Richard D. Gardner (R, Asbury / Franklin Township, 2014) and Freeholder Jason Sarnoski (R, Lopatcong Township, 2016).[56] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Patricia J. Kolb (Blairstown Township),[57] Sheriff David Gallant (Blairstown Township) and Surrogate Kevin O'Neill (Hackettstown).[58][59] The County Administrator, Steve Marvin, is responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operation of the county and its departments.[60]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 1,464 registered voters in Oxford Township, of which 338 (23.1% vs. 21.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 555 (37.9% vs. 35.3%) were registered as Republicans and 569 (38.9% vs. 43.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were two voters registered to other parties.[61] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 58.2% (vs. 62.3% in Warren County) were registered to vote, including 76.6% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 81.5% countywide).[61][62]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 591 votes here (57.4% vs. 56.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 403 votes (39.1% vs. 40.8%) and other candidates with 20 votes (1.9% vs. 1.7%), among the 1,030 ballots cast by the township's 1,495 registered voters, for a turnout of 68.9% (vs. 66.7% in Warren County).[63][64] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 662 votes here (58.0% vs. 55.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 417 votes (36.5% vs. 41.4%) and other candidates with 22 votes (1.9% vs. 1.6%), among the 1,142 ballots cast by the township's 1,517 registered voters, for a turnout of 75.3% (vs. 73.4% in Warren County).[65] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 698 votes here (63.1% vs. 61.0% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 379 votes (34.3% vs. 37.2%) and other candidates with 19 votes (1.7% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,106 ballots cast by the township's 1,443 registered voters, for a turnout of 76.6% (vs. 76.3% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 503 votes here (64.0% vs. 61.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 176 votes (22.4% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 83 votes (10.6% vs. 9.8%) and other candidates with 12 votes (1.5% vs. 1.5%), among the 786 ballots cast by the township's 1,468 registered voters, yielding a 53.5% turnout (vs. 49.6% in the county).[67]

Education[edit]

The Oxford Township School District serves public school students in pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade at Oxford Central School.[68] As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 278 students and 26.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.53:1.[69]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades are served by the Warren Hills Regional School District, which is a district for grades 7-12 that also serves students from the municipalities of Franklin Township, Mansfield Township, Washington Borough and Washington Township, with students from Oxford Township attending on a tuition bases as part of a sending/receiving relationship..[70] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[71]) are Warren Hills Regional Middle School[72] (grades 7 and 8; 663 students) located in Washington Borough and Warren Hills Regional High School[73] (grades 9 - 12; 1,276 students) located in Washington Township.[4]

Students from the township and from all of Warren County are eligible to attend Ridge and Valley Charter School in Frelinghuysen Township (for grades K-8)[74] or Warren County Technical School in Washington borough (for 9-12),[75] with special education services provided by local districts supplemented throughout the county by the Warren County Special Services School District in Oxford Township (for PreK-12).[68][76]

Transportation[edit]

As of 2010, the township had a total of 21.69 miles (34.91 km) of roadways, of which 13.02 miles (20.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.47 miles (10.41 km) by Warren County and 2.20 miles (3.54 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[77]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Oxford Township include:

Points of interest[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b c 2012 Official Directory, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  5. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 103.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Oxford, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Oxford township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 11. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Oxford township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Oxford, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  13. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Oxford, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed October 20, 2014.
  14. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  15. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed October 29, 2012.
  16. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  17. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  18. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Oxford CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 8, 2013.
  19. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  20. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  21. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, p. III-5, August 2012. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  22. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 247. Accessed October 23, 2012.
  23. ^ Snell, James P. (1881) History of Sussex and Warren Counties, New Jersey, With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers. Vol. 2 (Centennial ed., Harmony, NJ: Harmony Press, 1981) pg. 606
  24. ^ Harpster, Richard E. Historical Sites of Warren County. (Warren County Tercentenary Committee and Warren County Board of Chosen Freeholders, New Jersey, 1965) pg. 127
  25. ^ Stabilization of the Oxford Furnace, Warren County Cultural & Heritage Commission. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  26. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 23, 2014.
  27. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  28. ^ Bowen, Francis. American Almanac and Repository of Useful Knowledge for the Year 1843, p. 231, David H. Williams, 1842. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  29. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 272, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed June 10, 2013. "Oxford contained in 1850, 1,718 inhabitants; in 1860, 2,350; and in 1870, 2,952. The Scott mountain and the celebrated Oxford Furnace are in this township."
  30. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 141. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  31. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 260. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  32. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 100. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  33. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 339. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  34. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  35. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  36. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Oxford township, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  37. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Oxford township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  38. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Oxford township, Warren County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  39. ^ Township Directory, Oxford Township. Accessed March 16, 2011.
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  44. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  45. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
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  48. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  49. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  50. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
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  52. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  53. ^ District 24 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed February 11, 2014.
  54. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  55. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  56. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  57. ^ County Clerk's Office, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
  58. ^ Message from Surrogate, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 15, 2014.
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  62. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 10, 2013.
  63. ^ Presidential November 6, 2012 General Election Results - Warren County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 15, 2013. Accessed June 10, 2013.
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  68. ^ a b Municipal Guide to Public School Districts, Warren County, New Jersey. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  69. ^ District information for Oxford Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 22, 2014.
  70. ^ Warren Hills Regional School District 2013 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 8, 2014. "From the receiving districts of Franklin Township, Mansfield Township, Oxford (high school tuition students), Washington Borough and Washington Township, students progress along the academic continuum led by a faculty committed to planning and implementing a variety of instructional strategies and activities that facilitate the preparation of our students for the challenge of mastering the New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards and the Common Core State Standards."
  71. ^ Warren Hills Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 8, 2014.
  72. ^ Warren Hills Regional Middle School, Warren Hills Regional School District. Accessed December 8, 2014.
  73. ^ Warren Hills Regional High School, Warren Hills Regional School District. Accessed December 8, 2014.
  74. ^ Overview, Ridge and Valley Charter School. Accessed September 16, 2013. "Enrollment is open to any child in New Jersey, with preference for students from the districts of Blairstown, Frelinghuysen, Hardwick, Knowlton and North Warren Regional."
  75. ^ About Us, Warren County Technical School. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  76. ^ About, Warren County Special Services School District. Accessed September 16, 2013.
  77. ^ Warren County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  78. ^ "A One-of-a-Kind Artist Prepares for His Solo". The Wall Street Journal. January 9, 2009. Retrieved April 8, 2009. 
  79. ^ George Maxwell Robeson, Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed August 24, 2007.

External links[edit]