Paul Thomas Anderson

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Paul Thomas Anderson
Paul Thomas Anderson 2007 crop.jpg
Anderson in New York City, December 10, 2007
Born Paul Thomas Anderson
(1970-06-26) June 26, 1970 (age 44)
Studio City, California
Other names P.T.A., P.T. Anderson
Occupation Film director, screenwriter, producer
Years active 1988–present
Notable work(s) Boogie Nights, Magnolia, Punch-Drunk Love, There Will Be Blood, The Master
Partner(s) Maya Rudolph (2001–present)
Children 4

Paul Thomas Anderson (born June 26, 1970) is an American film director, screenwriter, and producer. Interested in film-making at a young age, Anderson was encouraged by his father Ernie Anderson (a disc jockey, and television and radio announcer/voiceover artist) to become a filmmaker. Anderson is a distinctive and revered filmmaker of his generation, initially being praised as a wunderkind after the release of Boogie Nights and Magnolia.

In 1993, he wrote and directed a short film titled Cigarettes & Coffee on a budget of $20,000. After he attended the Sundance Institute, Anderson had a deal with Rysher Entertainment to direct his first feature film, Hard Eight, in 1996. Anderson received critical and commercial success for his film Boogie Nights (1997), set during the Golden Age of Porn in the 1970s and 1980s. His third feature, Magnolia (1999), received wide acclaim despite struggling at the box office.

In 2002, Punch-Drunk Love, Anderson's fourth feature, was released to positive reviews. After a five-year absence, There Will Be Blood was released to critical acclaim in 2007. It is Anderson's highest-grossing film to date and is considered by many critics to be one of the most important films of the 2000s. In 2012, Anderson's sixth film, The Master, was released to critical acclaim. His seventh film, Inherent Vice, based on the novel of the same name by Thomas Pynchon, is scheduled for release in December 2014.

Early life[edit]

Paul Thomas Anderson was born on June 26, 1970, in Studio City, California, to Edwina (née Gough) and Ernie Anderson.[1][2] Ernie was an actor who was the voice of A.B.C. and a Cleveland television late-night horror movie host known as "Ghoulardi" (after whom Paul Thomas Anderson later named his production company).[1][2] Anderson grew up in the San Fernando Valley.[3] He is third youngest of nine children,[4][5] and had a troubled relationship with his mother but was close with his father, who encouraged him to become a writer or director.[6] Anderson attended a number of schools, including Buckley in Sherman Oaks, John Thomas Dye School, Campbell Hall School, Cushing Academy and Montclair Prep.[5]

Anderson was involved in film-making at a young age[7][8] and never really had an alternative plan to directing films.[9] He made his first movie when he was eight years old[4] and started making movies on a Betamax video camera which his dad bought in 1982 when he was twelve years old.[8] He later started using 8 mm film but realized that video was easier.[7] He began writing in adolescence, and at 17 years old he began experimenting with a Bolex sixteen millimeter camera.[7][10] After years of experimenting with "standard fare", he wrote and filmed his first real production as a senior in high school at Montclair Prep using money he earned cleaning cages at a pet store.[8][11] The film was a thirty-minute mockumentary shot on video called The Dirk Diggler Story (1988), about a pornography star; the story was inspired by John Holmes, who also served as a major inspiration for Boogie Nights.[5][6][7][10]

Anderson was raised Roman Catholic and has cited religion as a major influence in his films such as Magnolia, There Will Be Blood and The Master

Career[edit]

Early career[edit]

An admittedly poor student in high school, Anderson was unable to immediately attend college. Nevertheless, he spent two semesters as an English major at Emerson College and only two days at New York University. Anderson began his career as a production assistant on television movies, music videos and game shows in Los Angeles and New York City.[5][12][13] With some money he won gambling, his girlfriend's credit card, and $10,000 his father set aside for college, Anderson decided to make a twenty-minute film that would be his "college."[12]

The film he made was Cigarettes & Coffee (1993), a short film made for $20,000 connecting multiple story lines with a twenty-dollar bill.[5][10][14] The film was screened at the 1993 Sundance Festival Shorts Program. He decided to expand the film into a feature length film and was subsequently invited to the 1994 Sundance Feature Film Program.[5][10][14] At Sundance Feature Film Program, Michael Caton-Jones served as Anderson's mentor; he saw Anderson as someone with "talent and a fully formed creative voice but not much hands-on experience" and gave him some hard and practical lessons.[8]

1990s[edit]

Hard Eight[edit]

While at the Sundance Feature Film Program, Anderson already had a deal with Rysher Entertainment to direct his first feature.[8] In 1996, Anderson made his first full-length feature, Sydney, which was retitled Hard Eight (1996).[6] Upon completion of the film, Rysher re-edited it.[8] Anderson, who still had the workprint of his original cut, submitted the film,[10] which was accepted and screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1996 Cannes Film Festival.[15][16] Anderson was able to get his version released but only after he retitled the film and raised the $200,000 necessary to finish it; he, Philip Baker Hall, Gwyneth Paltrow, and John C. Reilly contributed the funding.[8][10] The version that was released was Anderson's[10] and the acclaim from the film launched his career.[5]

Boogie Nights[edit]

Anderson began working on the script for his next feature film during his troubles with Hard Eight,[8] completing the script in 1995.[10] The result was Anderson's breakout film[11][17][18] Boogie Nights (1997), a full-length major motion picture based on his short The Dirk Diggler Story.[5][10][19] The script was noticed by New Line Cinemas president, Michael De Luca, who felt "totally gaga" reading it.[8] It was released on October 10, 1997 and was a critical and commercial success.[6] The film revived the career of Burt Reynolds[20][21] and provided breakout roles for Mark Wahlberg[22] and Julianne Moore.[23][24] At 70th Academy Awards, the film received three Academy Award nominations, for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Burt Reynolds), Best Actress in a Supporting Role (Julianne Moore), and Best Original Screenplay.[25]

Magnolia[edit]

After the success of Boogie Nights, New Line told Anderson that he could do whatever he wanted for his next film and granted him creative control.[6] Though Anderson initially wanted to make a film that was "intimate and small-scale", the script "kept blossoming". The resulting film was the ensemble piece Magnolia (1999), which tells the story of the peculiar interaction of several individuals in the San Fernando Valley.[26][27] Anderson used the music of Aimee Mann as a basis and inspiration for the film,[28] commissioning her to write eight new songs.[29] At the 72nd Academy Awards, Magnolia received three nominations, for Best Actor in a Supporting Role (Tom Cruise), Best Original Song for "Save Me" by Aimee Mann and Best Original Screenplay.[30] Anderson stated after the film's release that "what I really feel is that Magnolia is, for better or worse, the best movie I'll ever make."[31]

2000s[edit]

Punch-Drunk Love[edit]

After the release of Magnolia, Anderson stated that he would like to work with Adam Sandler in the future and that he was determined to make his next film 90 minutes long.[17][26] His next feature was the comedy/romance film Punch-Drunk Love (2002), partly based on David Phillips (also called The Pudding Guy). The film starred Adam Sandler with Emily Watson portraying his love interest.[32] The story centers on a beleaguered small-business owner (Sandler) with anger issues and seven emasculating sisters.[32] Sandler received critical praise for his role in his first major departure from the mainstream comedies that had made him a star.[20][33] At the 2002 Cannes Film Festival, the film won the best director and was nominated for the Palme d'Or.[34]

There Will Be Blood[edit]

There Will Be Blood (2007) was loosely based on the Upton Sinclair novel Oil!.[35] The budget of the film was $25 million, and it earned $76.1 million worldwide.[36] Daniel Day-Lewis starred and won an Oscar for Best Leading Actor for his role.[37] The film received eight nominations overall at the 80th Academy Awards.[37] Paul Dano received a BAFTA nomination for Best Supporting Actor.[38] Anderson was nominated for Best Director from the Directors Guild of America.[39] The film also received eight Academy Award nominations, tying with No Country for Old Men for the most nominations.[40] Anderson received nominations for Best Picture, Best Director and Best Adapted Screenplay, losing all three to the Coen Brothers for No Country for Old Men.[37] There Will Be Blood was regarded by some critics as one of the greatest films of the decade, and some parties further declaring it one of the most accomplished American films of the modern era; David Denby of The New Yorker wrote "the young writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson has now done work that bears comparison to the greatest achievements of Griffith and Ford", while Richard Schickel proclaimed it "one of the most wholly original American movies ever made".[41]

2010s[edit]

The Master[edit]

In December 2009, Anderson was working on a new script tentatively titled The Master, about a "charismatic intellectual" who starts a new religion in the 1950s.[42] An associate of Anderson stated that the idea for the film had been in Anderson's head for about twelve years.[43] Though the film makes no reference to the movement, it has "long been widely assumed to be based on Scientology."[44] The Master was released on September 14, 2012 by The Weinstein Company in the United States and Canada[45] to critical acclaim.[46][47] The film received three nominations at the 85th Academy Awards: Joaquin Phoenix for Best Leading Actor, Philip Seymour Hoffman for Best Supporting Actor and Amy Adams for Best Supporting Actress.[48]

Inherent Vice[edit]

Production of Anderson's adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's 2009 novel Inherent Vice began in May 2013 and ended in August of the same year.[49] The film marks the first time that Pynchon allowed his work to be adapted for the screen and will see Anderson team up with Phoenix for a second time.[43][50][51][52] The supporting cast includes Owen Wilson,[53] Reese Witherspoon,[54][55] Jena Malone,[55] Martin Short,[55][56] Benicio Del Toro,[57] Katherine Waterston,[58] Josh Brolin,[59] Peter McRobbie,[60] Michael K. Williams[61] and Eric Roberts.[62]

Other work[edit]

Anderson was a standby director during the 2005 filming of Robert Altman's A Prairie Home Companion for insurance purposes, as Altman was 80 years old at the time.[63] In addition to films, Anderson has directed several music videos, including several for musician Fiona Apple.[64][65] In 2008, Anderson co-wrote and directed a 70-minute play at the Largo Theatre, comprising a series of vignettes starring Maya Rudolph and Fred Armisen, with a live musical score by Jon Brion.[66]

Influences and style[edit]

Influences[edit]

Anderson only attended film school for two days, preferring to learn the craft by watching films by the filmmakers he liked, as well as watching films accompanied by director's audio commentary.[3][9][10] In 2012 at Australia's Melbourne premiere of The Master at The Astor Theatre, Anderson spoke candidly of his brief experiences at film school, remarking of his frustration at the dull silent movies displayed by lecturers who showed films that turned the experience into 'homework or a chore'.[67] Anderson cites Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, Jonathan Demme, Stanley Kubrick, Orson Welles, and Max Ophüls as his main influences as a filmmaker.[7][18][68]

Themes and style[edit]

Anderson is known for films set in the San Fernando Valley with realistically flawed and desperate characters.[9][69] Among the themes dealt with in Anderson's films are dysfunctional familial relationships,[18][68][70] alienation,[68] surrogate families,[71] regret,[68] loneliness,[18] destiny,[5] the power of forgiveness,[4] and ghosts of the past.[18] Anderson's films are known for their bold visual style[69] which includes stylistic trademarks such as constantly moving camera,[31][69] steadicam-based long takes,[11][18][72] memorable use of music,[11][31][69] and multilayered audiovisual imagery.[11][72] Anderson also tends to reference the Book of Exodus, either explicitly or subtly, such as in recurring references to Exodus 8:2 in Magnolia,[73] which chronicles the Plague of frogs, culminating with the literal raining of frogs in the film's climax, or the title and themes in There will be blood, a phrase that can be found in Exodus 7:19, which details the Plague of blood.[74]

Within his first three films, Hard Eight, Boogie Nights, and Magnolia, Anderson explored themes of dysfunctional families, alienation, and loneliness.[18][68] Boogie Nights and Magnolia were noted for their large ensemble casts.[17][69] In Punch-Drunk Love, Anderson explored similar themes but expressed a different visual style, shedding the influences and references of his earlier films, being more surreal and having a heightened sense of reality.[68][72] It was also short, compared to his previous two films, at 90 minutes.[17]

There Will Be Blood stood apart from his first four films but shared similar themes and style such as flawed characters, moving camera, memorable music, and a lengthy running time.[69] The film was more overtly engaged with politics than his previous films had been,[17] examining capitalism and themes such as savagery, optimism, and obsession.[75] The Master dealt with "ideas about American personality, success, rootlessness, master-disciple dynamics, and father-son mutually assured destruction."[76] Inherent Vice returned to the ensemble cast that was prevalent in his early works of Boogie Nights and Magnolia.[59][77]

Frequent collaborators[edit]

Anderson frequently collaborates with many actors and crew, carrying them over from film to film.[78] Anderson has referred to his regular actors as "my little rep company" that includes John C. Reilly, Philip Baker Hall, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Julianne Moore, William H. Macy, and Melora Walters.[79] Luis Guzmán is also considered an Anderson regular.[80] Hoffman acted in Anderson's first four films[81] as well as The Master.[82] Except for Paul F. Tompkins, Kevin Breznahan, and Jim Meskimen, who all had equally minor roles in Magnolia,[83] There Will Be Blood had an entirely new cast. Additionally, Robert Elswit has been cinematographer for all of Anderson's films except The Master which was shot by Mihai Mălaimare, Jr.[84] Jon Brion has served as composer for three of his films (Hard Eight, Magnolia, and Punch-Drunk Love)[85] and Jonny Greenwood of Radiohead has served as composer on three of his films (There Will Be Blood, The Master, and Inherent Vice).[86] Anderson also regularly works with producing partners JoAnne Sellar, Scott Rudin, Michael De Luca, and Daniel Lupi[87] as well as casting director Cassandra Kulukundis.[82]

Actor Hard Eight (1996) Boogie Nights (1997) Magnolia (1999) Punch-Drunk Love (2002) There Will Be Blood (2007) The Master (2012) Inherent Vice (2014)
Jason Andrews NoN NoN NoN
Jillian Bell NoN NoN
Kevin Breznaham NoN NoN
Rico Bueno NoN NoN
Jake Cross NoN NoN NoN
Martin Dew NoN NoN
Robert Downey Sr. NoN NoN
Patricia Forte NoN NoN
Allan Graf NoN NoN
Luis Guzmán NoN NoN NoN
Philip Baker Hall NoN NoN NoN
Veronica Hart NoN NoN
Philip Seymour Hoffman NoN NoN NoN NoN NoN
Thomas Jane NoN NoN
Ricky Jay NoN NoN
William H. Macy NoN NoN
Don McManus NoN NoN
Jim Meskimen NoN NoN
Alfred Molina NoN NoN
Julianne Moore NoN NoN
Charley Morgan NoN NoN
Kevin J. O'Connor NoN NoN
Joaquin Phoenix NoN NoN
Mary Lynn Rajskub NoN NoN
John C. Reilly NoN NoN NoN
Robert Ridgely NoN NoN
Joel Shock NoN NoN
Matthew Skomo NoN NoN
Tim Soronen NoN NoN
Melissa Spell NoN NoN
Arne Starr NoN NoN
Erica Sullivan NoN NoN
Paul F. Tompkins NoN NoN
Melora Walters NoN NoN NoN NoN
David Warshofsky NoN NoN
Steven Wiig NoN NoN

Personal life[edit]

Anderson has been in a relationship with actress and comedienne Maya Rudolph since 2001.[88][89] They live together in Los Angeles[4][82] with their four children: daughters Pearl Minnie (born October 2005),[90][91][92] Lucille (born November 2009),[93] and Minnie Ida (born August 2013), [94] as well as son Jack (born July 2011).[95]

Filmography[edit]

Feature films[edit]

Year Film Credited as
Director Writer Producer
1996 Hard Eight (also known as Sydney) Yes Yes
1997 Boogie Nights Yes Yes Yes
1999 Magnolia Yes Yes Yes
2002 Punch-Drunk Love Yes Yes Yes
2007 There Will Be Blood Yes Yes Yes
2012 The Master Yes Yes Yes
2014 Inherent Vice Yes Yes Yes

Short films[edit]

Music videos[edit]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Anderson has been hailed as "one of the most exciting talents to come along in years"[96] and "among the supreme talents of today."[97] After the release of Boogie Nights and Magnolia, Anderson was praised as a wunderkind.[98] In 2004, Anderson was ranked twenty-first on The Guardian's list of the forty best directors.[99] In 2007, Total Film named him the twentieth greatest director of all time and the American Film Institute regarded him as "one of American film's modern masters."[75][100] In 2012, The Guardian ranked him number one on its list of "The 23 Best Film Directors in the World," stating "his dedication to his craft has intensified, with his disdain for PR and celebrity marking him out as the most devout filmmaker of his generation."[101] In 2013, Entertainment Weekly named him the eighth-greatest working director, calling him "one of the most dynamic directors to emerge in the last 20 years."[102] In a podcast interview with critic Elvis Mitchell, director Sam Mendes referred to Anderson as "a true auteur – and there are very few of those who I would classify as geniuses",[103] and Ben Affleck in his acceptance speech for the Golden Globe Award for Best Director said "Paul Thomas Anderson, who I think is like Orson Welles."[104] Peter Travers of Rolling Stone, in his review of The Master wrote: The Master, the sixth film from the 42-year-old writer-director, affirms his position as the foremost filmmaking talent of his generation. Anderson is a rock star, the artist who knows no limits."[105]

Year Award Category Title Result
1996 Deauville Film Festival Grand Special Prize Sydney Nominated
1997 Boston Society of Film Critics Award Best New Film-Maker Boogie Nights
Sydney
Won
1997 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award New Generation Award Boogie Nights Won
1997 Toronto International Film Festival Metro Media Award Boogie Nights Won
1998 Academy Award Best Original Screenplay Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 BAFTA Award Best Screenplay Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 European Film Award Screen International Award Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Independent Spirit Award Best First Feature Sydney Nominated
1998 Independent Spirit Award Best First Screenplay Sydney Nominated
1998 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Director Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Satellite Award Best Director Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Satellite Award Best Motion Picture Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Satellite Award Best Screenplay Boogie Nights Nominated
1998 Writers Guild of America Award Best Screenplay Boogie Nights Nominated
1999 Toronto Film Critics Association Award Best Director Magnolia Won
1999 Toronto Film Critics Association Award Best Screenplay Magnolia Won
2000 Academy Award Best Original Screenplay Magnolia Nominated
2000 Berlin International Film Festival Golden Berlin Bear Magnolia Won
2000 Berlin International Film Festival Reader Jury of the "Berliner Morgenpost" Magnolia Won
2000 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Director Magnolia Nominated
2000 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Screenplay Magnolia Nominated
2000 Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Best Foreign Director Magnolia Nominated
2000 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay Magnolia Nominated
2000 San Sebastián International Film Festival FIPRESCI Film of the Year Magnolia Won
2000 Satellite Award Best Director Magnolia Nominated
2000 Satellite Award Best Screenplay Magnolia Nominated
2000 Writers Guild of America Award Best Screenplay Magnolia Nominated
2001 Bodil Award Best American Film Magnolia Nominated
2001 Empire Award Best Director Magnolia Nominated
2001 Guldbagge Award Best Foreign Film Magnolia Won
2001 London Critics Circle Film Award Screenwriter of the Year Magnolia Nominated
2002 Cannes Film Festival Best Director Punch-Drunk Love Won
2002 Cannes Film Festival Palme d'Or Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2002 Gijón International Film Festival Best Screenplay Punch-Drunk Love Won
2002 Gijón International Film Festival Best Feature Film Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2002 Toronto Film Critics Association Award Best Director Punch-Drunk Love Won
2003 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Director Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2003 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Screenplay Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2003 Motovun Film Festival Propeller of Motovun Award Punch-Drunk Love Won
2003 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2003 Phoenix Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay Punch-Drunk Love Nominated
2007 AFI Award AFI Movie of the Year There Will Be Blood Won
2007 Austin Film Critics Association Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2007 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2007 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2007 Dallas-Fort Worth Film Critics Association Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2007 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2007 New York Film Critics Circle Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2007 San Diego Film Critics Society Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2007 San Diego Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Won
2008 Academy Award Best Adapted Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Academy Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Academy Award Best Picture There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Amanda Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Won
2008 BAFTA Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 BAFTA Award Best Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 BAFTA Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Berlin International Film Festival Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2008 Berlin International Film Festival Golden Berlin Bear There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 David di Donatello Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Directors Guild of America Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Golden Eagle Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Won
2008 Italian National Syndicate of Film Journalists Best Non-European Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2008 London Critics Circle Film Award Director of the Year There Will Be Blood Won
2008 London Critics Circle Film Award Screenwriter of the Year There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 National Society of Film Critics Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Won
2008 National Society of Film Critics Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Online Film Critics Society Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 PGA Award Best Theatrical Motion Picture There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Russian Guild of Film Critics Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 San Sebastián International Film Festival FIPRESCI Film of the Year There Will Be Blood Won
2008 USC Scripter Award USC Scripter Award There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Vancouver Film Critics Circle Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2008 Writers Guild of America Award Best Screenplay There Will Be Blood Nominated
2009 Bodil Award Best American Film There Will Be Blood Won
2009 César Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2009 Empire Award Best Director There Will Be Blood Nominated
2009 Film Critics Circle of Australia Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2009 Guldbagge Award Best Foreign Film There Will Be Blood Nominated
2012 Boston Society of Film Critics Award Best Director The Master Nominated
2012 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Picture The Master Nominated
2012 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Director The Master Nominated
2012 Chicago Film Critics Association Award Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated
2012 Gotham Awards Best Feature The Master Nominated
2012 FIPRESCI Award Best Film The Master Won
2012 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award Best Director The Master Won
2012 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award Best Film The Master Nominated
2012 Satellite Awards Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated
2012 Venice International Film Festival Golden Lion The Master Nominated
2012 Venice International Film Festival Silver Lion The Master Won
2012 Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Best Director The Master Nominated
2012 Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated
2013 AACTA Awards Best International Screenplay The Master Nominated
2013 British Academy Film Awards Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated
2013 Broadcast Film Critics Association Award Best Picture The Master Nominated
2013 Broadcast Film Critics Association Award Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated
2013 National Society of Film Critics Award Best Film The Master Nominated
2013 National Society of Film Critics Award Best Director The Master Nominated
2013 National Society of Film Critics Award Best Screenplay The Master Nominated
2013 Writers Guild of America Award Best Original Screenplay The Master Nominated

References[edit]

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External links[edit]