Portal:Java

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This page is about the Java programming language. For the island of Java, see Java (island) and Portal:Indonesia.


The Java Portal

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Welcome to Wikipedia's Java portal. Java refers to a number of computer software products and specifications from Sun Microsystems that together provide a system for developing application software and deploying it in a cross-platform environment. Java is used in a wide variety of computing platforms from embedded devices and mobile phones to enterprise servers and supercomputers. Java is nearly ubiquitous in mobile phones, Web servers and enterprise applications, and while less common on desktop computers, Java applets are often used to provide improved functionality while browsing the World Wide Web. Code is produced through writing in the Java programming language, then executed by a Java Virtual Machine (JVM). In 2006, Sun Microsystems made the bulk of its implementation of Java available under a public license.
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Java applet that uses 3D hardware acceleration, downloading from the server 3D files in .pdb format to visualize
NASA World Wind (open source) is a second generation applet that heavily uses OpenGL and on-demand data downloading to provide detailed 3D map of the world.

Java applet

A Java applet is an applet delivered to the users in the form of Java bytecode. Java applets can run in a Web browser using a Java Virtual Machine (JVM), or in Sun's AppletViewer, a stand-alone tool for testing applets. Java applets were introduced in the first version of the Java language in 1995. Java applets are usually written in the Java programming language but they can also be written in other languages that compile to Java bytecode such as Jython, Ruby or Eiffel.

Applets are used to provide interactive features to web applications that cannot be provided by HTML alone. They can capture mouse input (like rotating 3D object) and also have controls like buttons or check boxes. In response to the user action an applet can change the provided graphic content. This makes applets well suitable for demonstration, visualization and teaching purposes. For instance, a complete suite for ordinary differential equations course has been written. An applet can also be text area only, providing, for instance, cross platform command-line interface to some remote system. If needed, applet can leave the dedicated area and run as separate window. However applets have very little control on web page content outside the applet dedicated area, so they are less useful for improving the site appearance in general (while applets like news tickers or WYSIWYG editors are also known). Applet can also play media in formats that are not natively supported by the browser.

Java applets run at a speed that is comparable to (but generally slower than) other compiled languages such as C++, but many times faster than JavaScript. In addition they can use 3D hardware acceleration that is available from Java. This makes applets well suitable for non trivial, computation intensive visualizations.

HTML page may embed parameters that are passed to the applet. Hence the same applet may appear differently depending on that parameters were passed. First implementations were downloading an applet class by class. While classes are small files, there are frequently a lot of them, so applets got a reputation of slow loading components. However since jars were introduced an applet is usually delivered as a single file that has a size of the bigger image (hundreds of kilobytes to several megabytes).

Since Java's bytecode is platform independent, Java applets can be executed by browsers for many platforms, including Windows, Unix, Mac OS and Linux. It is also trivial to run Java applet as an application with very little extra code. This has the advantage of running a Java applet in offline mode without the need for internet browser software and also directly from the development IDE.

Many Java developers, blogs and magazines are recommending that the Java Web Start technology be used in place of Applets.

A Java Servlet is sometimes informally compared to be "like" a server-side applet, but it is different in its language, functions, and in each of the characteristics described here about applets.

Java is the most used application of eLearning for engineering education because of its high value of visualization.

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Here is a screen capture of a Java applet to view Mandelbrot sets.

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Patrick Naughton (born in 1965) is an American software developer, best known as being one of the original creators of the Java programming language.

As a Sun engineer, Patrick Naughton had become increasingly frustrated with the state of Sun's C++ and C APIs (application programming interfaces) and tools. While considering moving to NeXT, Naughton was offered a chance to work on new technology and thus the Stealth Project was started.

The Stealth Project was soon renamed to the Green Project with James Gosling and Mike Sheridan joining Naughton. Together with other engineers, they began work in a small office on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. They were attempting to develop a new technology for programming next generation smart appliances, which Sun expected to be a major new opportunity.

In June and July 1994, after three days of brainstorming with John Gage, the Director of Science for Sun, James Gosling, Bill Joy, Naughton, Wayne Rosing, and Eric Schmidt, the team re-targeted the platform for the World Wide Web. They felt that with the advent of the first graphical web browser, Mosaic, the Internet was on its way to evolving into the same highly interactive medium that they had envisioned for cable TV. As a prototype, Naughton wrote a small browser, WebRunner, later renamed HotJava.

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Did you know...


  • ... that Java SE 6 is code-named Mustang?
  • ... that Duke is Java's mascot and "smart agent" assisting the user in PDA?

Quiz

1. Who said: "There's only one trick in software, and that is using a piece of software that's already been written."?

Answer

2. When was Java first released?

Answer

3. Why is JavaScript thus named if it is essentially unrelated to Java?

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4. Which was Java's original name: Green, Oak, Stealth, C++ ++ --, firstperson, Duke or Coffee?

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5. True or False: An Interface can never be private or protected?

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Java topics (all)

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List of Blu-ray disc replicating machines manufacturers
List of DVD recordable manufacturers
List of Blu-ray Disc recordable manufacturers

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(These articles are the ones recently identified as possibly Java-related but yet unconfirmed) This list was generated from these rules. Questions and feedback are always welcome! The search is being run daily with the most recent ~14 days of results. Note: Some articles may not be relevant to this project.

Rules | Match log | Results page (for watching) | Last updated: 2014-12-17 20:42 (UTC)




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Computer platform - Computer programming (Programming languages) - Software

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Java applet that allows some experimentation with various tunings and Bach temperaments:

on Globetrotter

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Java One 2009 - James Gosling on Java Store:
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When

Java timeline

  • 1992: Java 0 (Oak)
  • 1995: Java 1.0
  • 1997: Java 1.1
  • 1998: Java 1.2
  • 2000: Java 1.3
  • 2002: Java 1.4
  • 2004: Java 5
  • 2006: Java 6
  • 2011: Java 7

Where

Map of the World of Java

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- Al Gore (on CNN's Late Edition with Wolf Blitzer, 1999)

Al Gore


Index of Java articles

0-9      A       B       C       D       E       F       G       H       I       J       K      L      M      N      O      P      Q      R      S      T      U      V      W      X       Y      Z


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