Portal:Java

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from P:JAVAP)
Jump to: navigation, search
This page is about the Java programming language. For the island of Java, see Java (island) and Portal:Indonesia.


The Java Portal

1482 pages so far! (including 300 images)
Wave.svg
Shortcuts:
Welcome to Wikipedia's Java portal. Java refers to a number of computer software products and specifications from Sun Microsystems that together provide a system for developing application software and deploying it in a cross-platform environment. Java is used in a wide variety of computing platforms from embedded devices and mobile phones to enterprise servers and supercomputers. Java is nearly ubiquitous in mobile phones, Web servers and enterprise applications, and while less common on desktop computers, Java applets are often used to provide improved functionality while browsing the World Wide Web. Code is produced through writing in the Java programming language, then executed by a Java Virtual Machine (JVM). In 2006, Sun Microsystems made the bulk of its implementation of Java available under a public license.
More about Java...


Show new selections below (purge)

Selected article

Java Development Kit

The Java Development Kit (JDK) is an implementation of either one of the Java SE, Java EE or Java ME platforms[1] released by Oracle Corporation in the form of a binary product aimed at Java developers on Solaris, Linux, Mac OS X or Windows. The JDK includes a private JVM and a few other resources to finish the recipe to a Java Application.[2] Since the introduction of the Java platform, it has been by far the most widely used Software Development Kit (SDK).[citation needed] On 17 November 2006, Sun announced that it would be released under the GNU General Public License (GPL), thus making it free software. This happened in large part on 8 May 2007, when Sun contributed the source code to the OpenJDK.[3]

JDK contents

The JDK has as its primary components a collection of programming tools, including:

  • appletviewer – this tool can be used to run and debug Java applets without a web browser
  • apt – the annotation-processing tool[4]
  • extcheck – a utility which can detect JAR-file conflicts
  • idlj – the IDL-to-Java compiler. This utility generates Java bindings from a given Java IDL file.
  • jabswitch – the Java Access Bridge. Exposes assistive technologies on Microsoft Windows systems.
  • java – the loader for Java applications. This tool is an interpreter and can interpret the class files generated by the javac compiler. Now a single launcher is used for both development and deployment. The old deployment launcher, jre, no longer comes with Sun JDK, and instead it has been replaced by this new java loader.
  • javac – the Java compiler, which converts source code into Java bytecode
  • javadoc – the documentation generator, which automatically generates documentation from source code comments
  • jar – the archiver, which packages related class libraries into a single JAR file. This tool also helps manage JAR files.
  • javafxpackager – tool to package and sign JavaFX applications
  • jarsigner – the jar signing and verification tool
  • javah – the C header and stub generator, used to write native methods
  • javap – the class file disassembler
  • javaws – the Java Web Start launcher for JNLP applications
  • JConsole – Java Monitoring and Management Console
  • jdb – the debugger
  • jhat – Java Heap Analysis Tool (experimental)
  • jinfo – This utility gets configuration information from a running Java process or crash dump. (experimental)
  • jmap – This utility outputs the memory map for Java and can print shared object memory maps or heap memory details of a given process or core dump. (experimental)
  • jmc – Java Mission Control
  • jps – Java Virtual Machine Process Status Tool lists the instrumented HotSpot Java Virtual Machines (JVMs) on the target system. (experimental)
  • jrunscript – Java command-line script shell.
  • jstack – utility which prints Java stack traces of Java threads (experimental)
  • jstat – Java Virtual Machine statistics monitoring tool (experimental)
  • jstatd – jstat daemon (experimental)
  • keytool – tool for manipulating the keystore
  • pack200 – JAR compression tool
  • policytool – the policy creation and management tool, which can determine policy for a Java runtime, specifying which permissions are available for code from various sources
  • VisualVM – visual tool integrating several command-line JDK tools and lightweight[clarification needed] performance and memory profiling capabilities
  • wsimport – generates portable JAX-WS artifacts for invoking a web service.
  • xjc – Part of the Java API for XML Binding (JAXB) API. It accepts an XML schema and generates Java classes.

Experimental tools may not be available in future versions of the JDK.

The JDK also comes with a complete Java Runtime Environment, usually called a private runtime, due to the fact that it is separated from the "regular" JRE and has extra contents. It consists of a Java Virtual Machine and all of the class libraries present in the production environment, as well as additional libraries only useful to developers, such as the internationalization libraries and the IDL libraries.

Copies of the JDK also include a wide selection of example programs demonstrating the use of almost all portions of the Java API.

Ambiguity between a JDK and an SDK

The JDK forms an extended subset of a software development kit (SDK). It includes "tools for developing, debugging, and monitoring Java applications".[5] Oracle strongly suggests that they now use the term "JDK" to refer to the Java SE Development Kit. The Java EE SDK is available with or without the "JDK", by which they specifically mean the Java SE 7 JDK.[6]

Other JDKs

In addition to the most widely used JDK discussed in this article, there are other JDKs commonly available for a variety of platforms, some of which started from the Sun JDK source and some which did not. All of them adhere to the basic Java specifications, but they often differ in explicitly unspecified areas, such as garbage collection, compilation strategies, and optimization techniques. They include:

In development or in maintenance mode:

Not being maintained or discontinued:

See also

References

  1. ^ "Java SE 7 Features and Enhancements". Oracle Corporation. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "OpenJDK homepage". Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  3. ^ "Sun's May 8th announcement of source code for JDK". 
  4. ^ "JDK 5.0 Java Annotation Processing Tool (APT)-related APIs & Developer Guides -- from Sun Microsystems". Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  5. ^ "Java SE Downloads". Oracle. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "Java EE 7 SDK distributions require JDK 7" "Java Platform, Enterprise Edition 7 SDK - Installation Instructions". Installing the Software. Oracle. Retrieved 10 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Azul Zing product page". 
  8. ^ "Azul Zulu download page". 
  9. ^ "developerWorks : IBM developer kits : Downloads". Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  10. ^ "JRockit Family Download page". Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  11. ^ "Support at Apple". [dead link]
  12. ^ "Java Linux Contact Information". Archived from the original on 19 August 2007. Retrieved 2012-08-05. 
  13. ^ "Java-Linux Latest Information". Archived from the original on 19 October 1996. Retrieved 2012-08-05. 

External links

Selected picture

Read and edit Commons

Here is a photo of Sand Hill Road along which Java began as Green.

Driving down Sandhill Road.jpg

Selected biography

Patrick Naughton (born in 1965) is an American software developer, best known as being one of the original creators of the Java programming language.

As a Sun engineer, Patrick Naughton had become increasingly frustrated with the state of Sun's C++ and C APIs (application programming interfaces) and tools. While considering moving to NeXT, Naughton was offered a chance to work on new technology and thus the Stealth Project was started.

The Stealth Project was soon renamed to the Green Project with James Gosling and Mike Sheridan joining Naughton. Together with other engineers, they began work in a small office on Sand Hill Road in Menlo Park, California. They were attempting to develop a new technology for programming next generation smart appliances, which Sun expected to be a major new opportunity.

In June and July 1994, after three days of brainstorming with John Gage, the Director of Science for Sun, James Gosling, Bill Joy, Naughton, Wayne Rosing, and Eric Schmidt, the team re-targeted the platform for the World Wide Web. They felt that with the advent of the first graphical web browser, Mosaic, the Internet was on its way to evolving into the same highly interactive medium that they had envisioned for cable TV. As a prototype, Naughton wrote a small browser, WebRunner, later renamed HotJava.

Read more...

Did you know...


  • ... that Java SE 6 is code-named Mustang?
  • ... that Duke is Java's mascot and "smart agent" assisting the user in PDA?

Quiz

1. Who said: "There's only one trick in software, and that is using a piece of software that's already been written."?

Answer

2. When was Java first released?

Answer

3. Why is JavaScript thus named if it is essentially unrelated to Java?

Answer

4. Which was Java's original name: Green, Oak, Stealth, C++ ++ --, firstperson, Duke or Coffee?

Answer

5. True or False: An Interface can never be private or protected?

Answer (External link)

Java topics (all)

Lists

List of Blu-ray disc replicating machines manufacturers
List of DVD recordable manufacturers
List of Blu-ray Disc recordable manufacturers

Articles

  • Most Recent:


From bot (AlexNewArtBot):
(These articles are the ones recently identified as possibly Java-related but yet unconfirmed) This list was generated from these rules. Questions and feedback are always welcome! The search is being run daily with the most recent ~14 days of results. Note: Some articles may not be relevant to this project.

Rules | Match log | Results page (for watching) | Last updated: 2015-05-11 20:09 (UTC)






  • All:
Computing
Computer platform - Computer programming (Programming languages) - Software

Related portals

News

Read and edit Wikinews

Hi everybody! We just opened the WikiProject Java (and portal). Enjoy!

Java: (bot)


Science:

Selected sound


A comment of Paul Deitel on his ATM example

Selected video


This page demonstrates the use of the Cortado Java applet to dynamically select different subtitles tracks:

on Xiph

Featured Articles

Featured article star.svg Featured Articles

Symbol support vote.svg Good Articles

Cscr-candidate.svg Ongoing nominations

Categories

Books

Read and edit Wikibooks

When

Java timeline

  • 1992: Java 0 (Oak)
  • 1995: Java 1.0
  • 1997: Java 1.1
  • 1998: Java 1.2
  • 2000: Java 1.3
  • 2002: Java 1.4
  • 2004: Java 5
  • 2006: Java 6
  • 2011: Java 7

Where

Map of the World of Java

nothumb
1
 •
2
 •
3
 •
4
 •
5
 •
6
 •
7
 •
8
 •
9
 •
10
 •
11
 •

Glossaries (all)

WikiProjects

Things you can do


Java pages in need of attention


Selected quote

Read and edit Wikiquote

Barry Burd (Published in Java For Dummies, 4th Edition)

Index of Java articles

0-9      A       B       C       D       E       F       G       H       I       J       K      L      M      N      O      P      Q      R      S      T      U      V      W      X       Y      Z


Associated Wikimedia

The following Wikimedia sister projects provide more on this subject:
Wikibooks  Wikimedia Commons Wikinews  Wikiquote  Wikisource  Wikiversity  Wiktionary  Wikidata 
Books Media News Quotations Texts Learning resources Definitions Database