PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grants

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from PEN Translation Fund Grants)
Jump to: navigation, search

The PEN/Heim Translation Fund Grants were established in 2003 by PEN American Center following a gift of $730,000 by Michael Henry Heim, a noted literary translator.[1] Heim believed that there was a 'dismayingly low number of literary translations currently appearing in English'. The Grants' purpose is to promote the publication and reception of translated world literature in English.[2] Grants are awarded each year to a select number of literary translators based on quality of translation as well as the originality and importance of the original work. The Fund's mission is to promote the publication and reception of world literature.

Since the first grants were awarded in 2004, the Fund has supported translations of books from over 30 languages.

Many works supported by the Fund are eventually published, and a significant number have won or been shortlisted for major literary awards including the Best Translated Book Award, the Northern California Book Award for Translation, the R. R. Hawkins Award for Outstanding Professional, Reference or Scholarly Book, the National Jewish Book Award for Poetry, National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize, and Griffin Poetry Prize. Others have received additional support from the Lannan Foundation, or been named one of the New York Public Library's annual list of 25 Books to Remember.[2]

Previously known as the PEN Translation Fund Grants, the awards were renamed in honor of Heim, who insisted on complete anonymity,[3] after his passing in 2012.

List of Recipients[edit]

2004[edit]

The names of ten winners were announced. The voting members of the Advisory Board were Esther Allen, Sara Bershtel, Barbara Epler, Michael Henry Heim, and Eliot Weinberger.[4]

2005[edit]

The names of thirteen winners were announced. The voting members of the Advisory Board were Esther Allen, Sara Bershtel, Barbara Epler, Michael Henry Heim, and Eliot Weinberger.[5]

2006[edit]

The names of nine winners were announced. The voting members of the Advisory Board were Esther Allen, Sara Bershtel, Barbara Epler, Michael Henry Heim, Michael F. Moore, Richard Sieburth, and Eliot Weinberger.[6]

  • Johannes Goransson for Henry Parland's Collected Poems, a collection of poems in Swedish
  • Victoria Haggblom for Elisabeth Rynell's To Mervas, a novel in Swedish
  • Nicky Harman for Han Dong's Banished!, a novel in Chinese (University of Hawaii Press, 2009)
  • Ann L. Huss for Ge Fei's Beauty (Renmian taohua), a novel in Chinese
  • Sawako Nakayasu for Takashi Hiraide's For the Fighting Spirit of the Walnut, a poem in Japanese (New Directions Publishing, 2008)
  • Tegan Raleigh for Assia Djebar's The Tongue’s Blood Does Not Run Dry: Algerian Stories, a collection of stories in French (Seven Stories Press, 2006)
  • Constantine Rusanov for Tomas Venclova's The Junction, a collection of poems in Lithuanian
  • Stepan S. Simek for Petr Zelenka's Theremin and Iva Volankova's Three Sisters 2002.CZ, two plays in Czech
  • Alan Trei and Inna Feldbach for Anton Hansen Tammsaare's Robber’s Rise (Book 1 of the Truth and Justice pentalogy), a novel in Estonian

2007[edit]

The names of ten winners were announced. The voting members of the Advisory Board were Esther Allen, Sara Bershtel, Barbara Epler, Michael Henry Heim, Michael F. Moore, Richard Sieburth, and Eliot Weinberger.[7]

2008[edit]

The names of eight winners were announced. [8] [9] [10] [11] The voting members of the Advisory Board were Sara Bershtel, Edwin Frank, Michael Henry Heim, Michael F. Moore, Richard Sieburth and Jeffrey Yang, and Esther Allen served as the non-voting Chair.[12]

2009[edit]

The names of eleven winners were announced.[13] [14] The voting members of the Advisory Board were Sara Bershtel, Edwin Frank, Michael Henry Heim, Michael F. Moore, Richard Sieburth, and Jeffrey Yang, and Esther Allen served as the non-voting Chair.[15]

2010[edit]

The names of eleven winners were announced.[16] [17] [18] [19] The voting members of the Advisory Board were Esther Allen, David Bellos, Susan Bernofsky, Edwin Frank, Michael F. Moore, and Jeffrey Yang.[20]

  • Daniel Brunet for Dea Loher's The Last Fire, a play in German
  • Alexander Dawe for Ahmet Hamdi Tanpınar's collection of stories in Turkish
  • Peter Golub for Linor Goralik's collection of flash fiction in Russian
  • Piotr Gwiazda for Grzegorz Wroblewski's Kopenhaga, a collection of poems in Polish
  • David Hull for Mao Dun's Waverings, a novel in Chinese
  • Akinloye A. Ojo for Akinwunmi Isola's Afaimo and Other Poems, a collection of poems in Yorùbá
  • Angela Rodel for Georgi Tenev's Holy Light, a collection of stories in Bulgarian
  • Margo Rosen for Anatoly Naiman's Poetry and Untruth, a novel in Russian
  • Chip Rossetti for Mohamad Makhzangi's Animals in Our Days, a collection of stories in Arabic
  • Bilal Tanweer for Mohammad Khalid Akhtar's Love in Chikiwara (and Other Such Adventures), a novel in Urdu
  • Diane Thiel for Eugenia Fakinou's The Great Green, a novel in Greek

2011[edit]

The names of eleven winners were announced.[21] [22] [23] [24] [25] [26] [27] [28] The voting members of the Advisory Board were David Bellos, Susan Bernofsky, Edwin Frank, Michael Reynolds, Natasha Wimmer, and Jeffrey Yang, and Michael F. Moore served as the non-voting Chair.[29]

  • Amiri Ayanna for The St. Katharinental Sister Book: Lives of the Sisters of the Dominican Convent at Diessenhofen, a sacred text in German
  • Neil Blackadder for Lukas Bärfuss's 'The Test (Good Simon Korach), a play in German
  • Clarissa Botsford for Elvira Dones's Sworn Virgin, a novel in Italian
  • Steve Bradbury for Hsia Yü's Salsa, a collection of poems in Chinese
  • Annmarie S. Drury for Euphrase Kezilahabi's collection of poems in Swahili
  • Diane Nemec Ignashev for Viktor Martinovich's Paranoia, a novel in Russian (Northwestern University Press, 2013)
  • Chenxin Jiang for Ji Xianlin's Memories of the Cowshed, a memoir in Chinese
  • Hilary B. Kaplan for Angélica Freitas's Rilke Shake, a collection of poems in Portuguese
  • Catherine Schelbert for Hugo Ball's Flametti, or the Dandyism of the Poor, a novel in German
  • Joel Streicker for Samanta Schweblin's Birds in the Mouth, a collection of stories in Spanish
  • Sarah L. Thomas for Mar Goméz Glez's Turnaround, a novel in Spanish

2012[edit]

The names of thirteen winners were announced.[30] [31] [32] [33] [34] [35] [36] [37] [38] [39] [40] The voting members of the Advisory Board were Susan Bernofsky, Barbara Epler, Edwin Frank, Michael Reynolds, Richard Sieburth, Eliot Weinberger, and Natasha Wimmer, and Michael F. Moore served as the non-voting Chair.[41]

  • Bernard Adams for Andrea Tompa's A Hóhér Háza (The Hangman’s House), a novel in Hungarian
  • Alexander Booth for Lutz Seiler's Im Felderlatein (In Latin Fields), a collection of poems in German
  • Brent Edwards for Michel Leiris's L’Afrique fantome (Phantom Africa), an ethnography in French (Seagull Books)
  • Joshua Daniel Edwin for Dagmara Kraus's cumbering (gloomerang), a collection of poems in German
  • Musharraf Ali Farooqi for Muhammad Husain Jah and Ahmed Husain Qamar's Hoshruba: The Prisoner of Batin, an epic in Urdu (Random House India)
  • Deborah Garfinkle for Pavel Šrut's Worm-Eaten Time: Poems from a Life Under Normalization, a collection of poems in Czech
  • Hillary Gulley for Marcelo Cohen's El fin de lo mismo (The End of the Same), a novel in Spanish
  • Bonnie Huie for Qiu Miaojin's Notes of a Crocodile, a novel in Chinese (NYRB Classics)
  • Jacquelyn Pope for Hester Knibbe's Hungerpots, a collection of poems in Dutch
  • Matt Reeck and Aftab Ahmad for Mushtaq Ahmad Yusufi's Mirages of the Mind, a novel in Urdu
  • Carrie Reed for Duan Chengshi's Youyang zazu (Miscellaneous Morsels from Youyang), a collection of prose in Chinese
  • Nathanaël for Hervé Guibert's The Mausoleum of Lovers, a set of journals in French (Nightboat Books)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Meg Sullivan (October 2, 2012). "Obituary: Michael Heim, 69, professor and award-winning translator of Kundera, Grass". UCLA Newsroom. Retrieved October 3, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "PEN American Center - Translation Fund". Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  3. ^ Bernofsky, Susan (October 3, 2012). "Michael Henry Heim: PEN Translation Fund Donor's Identity Revealed". Retrieved January 20, 2013. 
  4. ^ "2004 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  5. ^ "2005 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  6. ^ "2006 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  7. ^ "2007 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  8. ^ "And the Winners Are! (Publishers, sign these folks up…)". Words without Borders. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  9. ^ "2008 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Three Percent (Open Letter Books). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  10. ^ "WMU Japanese literature professor wins national grant from PEN Translation Fund". Western Michigan University. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  11. ^ "Angles receives prestigious grant for translation". Western Michigan University. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  12. ^ "2008 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  13. ^ "2009 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Three Percent (Open Letter Books). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  14. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Grant for work of German poet". Goethe-Institut USA. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  15. ^ "2009 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  16. ^ "2010 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Three Percent (Open Letter Books). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  17. ^ "2010 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". Center for the Art of Translation. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  18. ^ "Comparative literature professor receives grant to translate poetry collection". Columns. University of Georgia. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  19. ^ "Dea Loher Excerpt Granted by PEN Translation Fund". Goethe-Institut USA. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  20. ^ "2010 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  21. ^ "PEN American Center's 2011 award winners". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  22. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Grant Announces 11 Recipients for 2011". Publishing Perspectives. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  23. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Grant Winners Announced". Harriet (Poetry Foundation). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  24. ^ "2011 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Three Percent (Open Letter Books). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  25. ^ "2011 PEN Literary Awards Winners". Publishers Weekly. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  26. ^ "Theatre professor Neil Blackadder awarded translation grant". Knox College. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  27. ^ "Susanna Daniel & Danielle Evans Share PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize". GalleyCat. Mediabistro.com. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  28. ^ "QC Prof Receives Prestigious Translation Grant". Queens College MFA Bulletin Blog. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  29. ^ "2011 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  30. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Brings World Literature to Americans". IIP Digital. U.S. Department of State. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  31. ^ "2012 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Three Percent (Open Letter Books). Retrieved June 29, 2012. 
  32. ^ "PEN American Center Announces the 2012 Translation Fund Grant Recipients". Beyond the Beyond (Wired.com). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  33. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Grant Winners Announced". Harriet (Poetry Foundation). Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  34. ^ "TWO LINES and the 2012 PEN Translation Fund Winners". Center for the Art of Translation. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  35. ^ "PEN translation grants for German titles". Goethe-Institut USA. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  36. ^ "PEN is mightier than S.W.O.R.D.*". literalab: Central European literary life. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  37. ^ "PEN Translation Fund grants". The Literary Saloon. the complete review. Retrieved July 17, 2012. 
  38. ^ "Accomplishments/Publications". School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Retrieved July 18, 2012. 
  39. ^ "PEN Translation Fund Grant for Pavel Šrut poetry collection". Czech Literature Portal. Retrieved July 20, 2012. 
  40. ^ "The Week in Translation". Words Without Borders. Retrieved July 30, 2012. 
  41. ^ "2012 PEN Translation Fund Grant Recipients". PEN American Center. Retrieved January 20, 2013. 

External links[edit]