Pacifico Marcos

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Pacifico Marcos
Born Pacifico Edralin Marcos
(1919-01-30) January 30, 1919 (age 95)
Sarrat, Ilocos Norte, Philippines
Nationality Philippines Filipino
Known for Medical doctor

Pacífico Edralín Marcos (born January 30, 1919) was a physician and the younger brother of former President of the Philippines Ferdinand E. Marcos. Dr. Marcos was born in Sarrat, Ilocos Norte to Mariano Marcos and Josefa Quetulio Edralin.[1] Marcos, a graduate of the University of the Philippines College of Medicine and a member of the Mu Sigma Phi Fraternity, was a President of the Philippine Medical Association.[2] In 1971 he was appointed the first chair of the nine-member Philippine Medical Care Commission.[3] This commission was tasked to provide medical insurance to poor Filipinos. The commission's program ran for almost a quarter of a century. He was chair for 12 years.[4] In the 1970s, Marcos headed a defense fund which supported two Filipina nurses accused of killing 10 patients in the Ann Arbor Hospital Murders. He called their conviction a "miscarriage of justice".[5]

He owned, controlled, or had interests in 50 corporations,[6] including a large car dealership,[3] a sugar mill called Consolidate Sugar Corporation,[7] a real estate firm called Citizens Development Inc,[8] and Philippine Seed Inc.[9]

Marcos did not involve himself in politics, and distanced himself from his brother's regime when it grew unpopular during the 1980s.[citation needed] In a 1986 interview he said he was unaware of his brother's wealth.[3] He did not join the Marcos family in Hawaii after the EDSA Revolution, and opted to stay in the Philippines in retirement until his death.

In 1998 Marcos was the subject of a lawsuit over an under-collateralized "behest loan" in the amount of 60 million which his company, Bagumbayan Corp, received from the Development Bank of the Philippines. It was one of a series of lawsuits over behest loans given to associates of President Marcos.[10] The case was finally dismissed in 2007 by the Supreme Court, which said there was no evidence that the loan was given simply because Pacifico Marcos was a "crony" of the former president.[11]

His son, Mariano "Nonong" Marcos II, is now a provincial board member in Ilocos Norte.

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ Zumel, Antonio. "National Press Club: Meet the Press". Retrieved December 16, 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c "MARCOS'S MOTHER, AND HER HOSPITAL BILL, ARE LEFT BEHIND". New York Times. March 30, 1986. p. A.12. 
  4. ^ "NATIONAL HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAM (NHIP) Philippine Health Insurance Corporation". asean-ssa.org. Retrieved December 16, 2010. 
  5. ^ "Long Count to A Guilty Verdict". Time. July 25, 1977. 
  6. ^ BEECH, KEYES (October 24, 1980). "Iron Lady". Los Angeles Times. p. B1. 
  7. ^ "Republic of the Philippines SUPREME COURT SECOND DIVISION G.R. No. 68786 July 21, 1989 DEVELOPMENT BANK OF THE PHILIPPINES, petitioner, vs. HONORABLE NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS COMMISSION, et al.". lawphil.net. July 21, 1989. Retrieved December 16, 2010. 
  8. ^ Dumlao, Doris (November 20, 2010). "Jollibee CFO: My job is to prepare the company for all kinds of shocks". Philippine Daily Inquirer. 
  9. ^ "Republic of the Philippines SUPREME COURT EN BANC G.R. No. 130140". lawphil.net. October 25, 1999. Retrieved December 16, 2010. 
  10. ^ "PCGG asks Court to consolidate 17 behest loan cases on appeal". BusinessWorld (Manila). December 16, 1998. p. 1. 
  11. ^ Canlas, Jomar (November 29, 2007). "SC rules in favor of Marcos brother". The Manila Times. 

Template:Unparticular family generation hidden on origins of modern marcoses