Painted terrapin

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Painted terrapin
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Reptilia
Order: Testudines
Suborder: Cryptodira
Family: Geoemydidae
Genus: Batagur[1]
Species: B. borneoensis
Binomial name
Batagur borneoensis
(Schlegel & Muller, 1844)
Synonyms[2]
  • Emys borneoensis Schlegel & Müller, 1845
  • Tetraonyx affinis Cantor, 1847
  • Batagur picta Gray, 1862
  • Clemmys borneoensis Strauch, 1862
  • Clemmys grayi Strauch, 1865
  • Callagur picta Gray, 1870
  • Cantorella affinis Gray, 1870
  • Kachuga major Gray, 1873
  • Tetraonyx pictus Theobald, 1876
  • Batagur borneensis Hubrecht, 1881 (ex errore)
  • Kachuga brookei Bartlett, 1895
  • Callagur borneoensis Smith, 1930
  • Callagur pictus Pritchard, 1967

The painted terrapin, painted batagur, or saw-jawed turtle (Batagur borneoensis) is a species of turtles in the Geoemydidae family. It was formerly in its own genus, Callagur, but has been reclassified to the genus, Batagur.[3]

Distribution[edit]

It is distributed in the Rainforest of Brunei, Indonesia (Sumatra and Kalimanta), Malaysia, and Thailand.

Status[edit]

The painted terrapin is critically endangered species according IUCN, listed in The World's Most 25 Endangered Freshwater Turtles and Tortoises 2011.[4] It is listed in Appendix II, with a zero quota for commercial trade of wild-captured specimens according to the CITES meeting in Thailand, March 2013.

Batagur borneoensis is a priority species to be conserved in Indonesia according Minister of Forestry Decree No. 57 Year 2008 about Strategic Direction of National Species Conservation 2008–18. In Malaysia, this species is protected by the World Wide Fund for Nature.

Threats[edit]

Harvesting by fishermen to eat, poaching to meet pet and food demand, habitat loss due to land conversion to palm oil, and fish and shrimp farming are major threats.

Conservation[edit]

Conservation efforts in Sumatra, Indonesia, are ongoing to increase wild populations by carrying out nesting patrols to secure and hatch the eggs, for later release into original habitats.[5]

In Malaysia, the Painted Terrapin is protected through the WWF's Hawksbill Turtle and Painted Terrapin conservation project. The project aims establish the protection and effective management of critical nesting habitats of Painted Terrapins and their key habitats, through measures that are scientifically-based and socially acceptable, and that can be sustained in the long-term by government, the local community and other stakeholders.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Praschag, P., Hundsdörfer, A. K. & Fritz, U. (2007). Phylogeny and taxonomy of endangered South and South-east Asian freshwater turtles elucidated by mtDNA sequence variation (Testudines: Geoemydidae: Batagur, Callagur, Hardella, Kachuga, Pangshura). —Zoologica Scripta, 36, 429-442.
  2. ^ Fritz Uwe; Peter Havaš (2007). "Checklist of Chelonians of the World". Vertebrate Zoology 57 (2): 213–214. Archived from the original on 2010-12-17. Retrieved 29 May 2012. 
  3. ^ Praschag, P., Hundsdörfer, A. K. & Fritz, U. (2007). Phylogeny and taxonomy of endangered South and South-east Asian freshwater turtles elucidated by mtDNA sequence variation (Testudines: Geoemydidae: Batagur, Callagur, Hardella, Kachuga, Pangshura). —Zoologica Scripta, 36, 429-442.
  4. ^ Turtle Conservation Coalition (Rhodin, A.G.J., Walde, A.D., Horne, B.D., Van Dijk, P.P., Blanck, T., and Hudson,R.S (Eds)).2011. Turtles in Troubles: The World's 25 Most Endangered Tortoises and Freshwater Turtles-2011. Lunenburg. MA.IUCN/SSC Tortoise and Freshwater Turtle Specialist Group, Turtle Conservation Fund,Turtle Survival Alliance, Turtle Conservancy, Chelonian Research Foundation, Conservation International, Wildlife Conservation Society, and San Diego Zoo Global, 54 pp.
  5. ^ Painted Terrapin Conservation Initiative, Satucita Foundation.
  6. ^ http://wwf.panda.org/what_we_do/where_we_work/project/projects/index.cfm?uProjectID=MY0208

External links[edit]