Palace of Justice (Malaysia)

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Palace of Justice
Istana Kehakiman
ايستان كهكيمن
Palace of Justice Putrajaya Dec 2006 002.jpg
Front view of the Palace of Justice
General information
Type Federal Court
Architectural style Islamic
Moorish
Palladian and Neoclassicism
Town or city Putrajaya
Federal Territory
Country Malaysia
Groundbreaking 1999
Construction started 2000
Completed 2003
Inaugurated 2004
Technical details
Floor count 5
Design and construction
Architect Putrajaya Corporation (PPJ)
Front view of the Palace of Justice

The Palace of Justice (Malay: Istana Kehakiman; Jawi: ايستان كهكيمن) houses the Malaysian Court of Appeal and Federal Court, which moved to Putrajaya from the Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur in the early 2000s.

History[edit]

Side view of the palace of Justice

Due to the need for a proper office of the head of the Judicial system in Malaysia, a location within the Precinct 3 of Putrajaya was identified for this purpose. aQidea Architect was once again called to be commissioned to design the building after finishing the Prime Ministers Office not far from the Palace of Justice. It has 2 Appeal Courts and 6 Federal courts which has intdicate network of passages segregating the Judges, witnesses, public, and the accused leading to the courts right from the car park or area of arrival. This is for the safety and security of everyone involved in order to achieve the desired courts functions and ambiance. The design is about bringing about "Order" and order is the theme of the day as the layouts are fashioned in an orderly manner, right from the smallest of rooms to the biggest and from the public realm to the private domain.AR Ahmad Rozi A Wahab, the principal Architect was personally responsible for the design layout and coming out with the architectural concept and ideas.

Architecture[edit]

Palace of Justice at night

The Palace of Justice's design incorporates influences of Classical Islamic culture like Taj Mahal in India, Moorish culture, like the Sultan Abdul Samad Building in Kuala Lumpur and Western Classical influence, like Palladian. The classical design gives depths to the building skin and creates interesting articulated facade.

The complex comprises of a five-storey building for the judiciary and a two-storey building to house the courts and offices.[1]

Interior[edit]

There is a large central atrium (Rotunda) around which the various rooms are arranged. The atrium helps to orientate visitors who had just arrived into the building and has clear visual connection to the other floors above.

The Library is located on the Ground floor adjacent to the entrance door, with the hearing rooms of both the Federal and Appeal Courts located on the first floor. The Registries and offices of the Appeal and Federal Courts are on the second and third floors respectively. The Judges chambers of the Appeal and Federal Court are located on the fourth and fifth floor.

The locations of these functions are design on designated levels to ensure privacy and security. Even the location of car parking are segregated between the judges, the staffs and the public. The arrival point of these people driving in their cars are carefully scrutinised to ensure safety, security and privacy. The layout is design to have direct access for judges to go to their respective chambers from their car park . Public spaces are design to certain secured zones only.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Palace of Justice". Tourism Malaysia. Retrieved 25 May 2014. 

External links[edit]

Media related to Palace of Justice, Putrajaya at Wikimedia Commons