Palaungic languages

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Palaungic
Geographic
distribution:
Indochina
Linguistic classification: Austroasiatic
  • Khasi–Palaungic
    • Palaungic
Glottolog: east2331  (East Palaungic)[1]
west2791  (West Palaungic)[2]
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The nearly thirty Palaungic or Palaung–Wa languages form a branch of the Austroasiatic languages.

Most of the Palaungic languages lost the contrastive voicing of the ancestral Austro-Asiatic consonants, with the distinction often shifting to the following vowel. In the Wa branch, this is generally realized as breathy voice vowel phonation; in Palaung–Riang, as a two-way register tone system. The Angkuic languages have contour tone — the U language, for example, has four tones, high, low, rising, falling, — but these developed from vowel length and the nature of final consonants, not from the voicing of initial consonants.

Classification[edit]

Diffloth & Zide (1992)[edit]

The Palaungic family includes at least three branches, with the position of some languages as yet unclear. Lamet, for example, is sometimes classified as a separate branch. The following classification follows that of Diffloth & Zide (1992), as quoted in Sidwell (2009:131).

Some researchers include the Mangic languages as well, instead of grouping them with the Pakanic languages.

Sidwell (2010)[edit]

The following classification follows the branching given by Sidwell (2010, ms).[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "East Palaungic". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "West Palaungic". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ http://sealang.net/sala/archives/pdf8/svantesson1991hu.pdf
  4. ^ Three Austroasiatic branches and the ASJP (Fig. 23)
  5. ^ Hall, Elizabeth. 2010. A Phonology of Muak Sa-aak. M.A. thesis, Payap University.

Further reading[edit]

Gordon, Darren. ''A selective Palaungic linguistic bibliography. Mon-Khmer Studies vol. 42 Mahidol University and SIL International.