Palisade Glacier

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Palisade Glacier
North Palisade Glacier.jpg
Climbing the Palisade Glacier
Map showing the location of Palisade Glacier
Map showing the location of Palisade Glacier
Palisade Glacier
Palisades, Inyo County, California, USA
Type Mountain glacier
Coordinates 37°06′00″N 118°30′37″W / 37.10000°N 118.51028°W / 37.10000; -118.51028Coordinates: 37°06′00″N 118°30′37″W / 37.10000°N 118.51028°W / 37.10000; -118.51028[1]
Area .31 sq mi (0.80 km2)
Length .81 mi (1.30 km)

The Palisade Glacier is located on the northeast side of the Palisades within the John Muir Wilderness in the central Sierra Nevada of California.[2] The glacier descends from the flanks of four mountain peaks over 14,000 ft (4,300 m) in elevation of which North Palisade (14,242 ft (4,341 m)) is third highest peak in the Sierra Nevada Range.[3]

The cirque containing the Palisade Glacier has a history of thousands of years of glaciation. The modern glacier attained its last maximum extent during the Little Ice Age, between 250 and 170 years ago (a period also known as the Matthes glaciation in the Sierra Nevada).[4][5] It currently has an area of .31 sq mi (0.80 km2) and the glacier is .81 mi (1.30 km) long and .50 mi (0.80 km) wide.[6] It is located between 13,400 and 12,000 ft (4,100 and 3,700 m) and moves at a rate of 20 ft (6.1 m) per year, although it is also retreating.[7] Palisade Glacier is one of the few glaciers in California that terminates in a proglacial lake dammed by its former moraine and the lake is turquoise colored from the glacial powder suspended in the water. The Big Pine Lakes below the glacier are also the same color.[8] Another feature of the glacier is a moulin,[7] which was formed in a drought during 1977,[9] and a bergschrund.[4]

The Palisade Glacier and its proglacial lake


See also in the United States[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Palisade Glacier". Geographic Names Information System, U.S. Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-10-2.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  2. ^ TopoQwest (United States Geological Survey Maps). North Palisade, CA (Map). http://www.topoquest.com/map.php?lat=37.09993&lon=-118.51038&datum=nad83&zoom=4. Retrieved 2012-10-2.
  3. ^ "North Palisade, California". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2012-10-2.  Check date values in: |accessdate= (help)
  4. ^ a b Mary Hill (2006). Geology of the Sierra Nevada. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-23695-5. 
  5. ^ Bowerman, Nicole D.; Doulgas H. Clark (May 2011). "Holocene Glaciation in the Central Sierra Nevada, California". Quaternary Science Reviews 30 (9-10): 1067. doi:10.1016/j.quascirev.2010.10.014. Retrieved June 24, 2013. 
  6. ^ James Gregory Moore (2000). Exploring the Highest Sierra. Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-3703-7. 
  7. ^ a b Isaac Nadeau (2006). Glaciers. The Rosen Publishing Group. ISBN 1-4042-3124-2. 
  8. ^ Allan A. Schoenherr (1995). A Natural History of California. University of Oregon Press. ISBN 0-520-06922-6. 
  9. ^ Bill Guyton (2001). Glaciers of California: Modern Glaciers, Ice Age Glaciers, the Origin of the Death Valley, and a Glacier Tour in the Sierra Nevada. University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-22683-6.