Palmer (mango)

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Display of 'Palmer' fruit at the Redland Summer Fruit Festival, Fruit and Spice Park, Homestead, Florida.

The 'Palmer' mango is a large, commercially grown late-season mango cultivar that originated in south Florida.

History[edit]

The original tree was grown from a seed planted around 1925 on the property of Mrs. Victor Mell of Miami, Florida. For the following decades 'Palmer' 's parentage was unknown, however a 2005 pedigree analysis estimated 'Palmer' was a seedling of 'Haden'.[1] The variety was first propagated in 1945 and officially named in 1949. It gained some commercial acceptance in Florida and is still grown on a limited commercial basis in the state today, as well as areas outside the United States such as Africa[2] and Australia.[3]

'Palmer' trees are planted in the collections of the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami,[4] the University of Florida's Tropical Research and Education Center in Homestead, Florida,[5] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park,[6] also in Homestead.

Description[edit]

The fruit is large, with especially big specimens reaching several pounds in weight. Coloration tends to be yellow with red blush when ripe; the fruit will turn purple long before becoming mature, sometimes leading to immature fruits being picked. The flesh is orange-yellow and has a mild and aromatic flavor, with minimal fiber, and contains a monoembryonic seed.[7] It ripens from July to early September in Florida, making it a late-season cultivar.

'Palmer' trees are moderately vigorous growers and have upright canopies.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.crec.ifas.ufl.edu/academics/faculty/burns/pdf/192-197.pdf
  2. ^ http://www.cirad.bf/doc/mouche2_09.pdf
  3. ^ http://www2.dpi.qld.gov.au/horticulture/5421.html
  4. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1665345 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  5. ^ http://trec.ifas.ufl.edu/crane/pdfs/TREC-Fruit-Collections.pdf Page 3, #76
  6. ^ http://fruitandspicepark.org/friends/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=43&Itemid=29
  7. ^ Campbell, Richard J. (1992). A Guide to Mangos in Florida. Fairchild Tropical Garden. p. 137. ISBN 0-9632264-0-1. 

See also[edit]