Palmyra, New Jersey

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Palmyra, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Palmyra
Motto: "A Place to Grow"
Palmyra highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Palmyra highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Palmyra, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Palmyra, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°00′09″N 75°02′07″W / 40.002615°N 75.035273°W / 40.002615; -75.035273Coordinates: 40°00′09″N 75°02′07″W / 40.002615°N 75.035273°W / 40.002615; -75.035273[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated April 19, 1894
Named for Palmyra, Syria
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Karen A. Scheffler (term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator John Gural[4]
 • Clerk Barbara A. Sheipe[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.550 sq mi (6.605 km2)
 • Land 1.864 sq mi (4.828 km2)
 • Water 0.686 sq mi (1.777 km2)  26.90%
Elevation[6] 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 7,398
 • Estimate (2012[10]) 7,410
 • Rank 309th of 566 in state
23rd of 40 in county[11]
 • Density 3,968.4/sq mi (1,532.2/km2)
 • Density rank 155th of 566 in state
7th of 40 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08065[12][13]
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 303, 726, 829[14]
FIPS code 3400555800[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885339[17][2]
Website www.boroughofpalmyra.com

Palmyra is a borough in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,398,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 307 (+4.3%) from the 7,091 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 35 (+0.5%) from the 7,056 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Palmyra was originally incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 19, 1894, from portions of Cinnaminson Township and Riverton. On February 20, 1923, Palmyra was reincorporated as a borough.[19]

Geography[edit]

Palmyra is located at 40°00′09″N 75°02′07″W / 40.002615°N 75.035273°W / 40.002615; -75.035273 (40.002615,-75.035273). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.550 square miles (6.605 km2), of which, 1.864 square miles (4.828 km2) of it was land and 0.686 square miles (1.777 km2) of it (26.90%) was water.[1][2]

The borough borders Riverton, Cinnaminson Township, Camden County, and the Delaware River. Across the Delaware, it borders the Tacony section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to which it is connected via Route 73 by the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge, which is named for the two communities connected by the bridge. The bridge was completed in 1929 at a cost of $4 million.[20]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 2,300
1910 2,801 21.8%
1920 3,834 36.9%
1930 4,968 29.6%
1940 5,178 4.2%
1950 5,802 12.1%
1960 7,036 21.3%
1970 6,969 −1.0%
1980 7,085 1.7%
1990 7,056 −0.4%
2000 7,091 0.5%
2010 7,398 4.3%
Est. 2012 7,410 [10] 0.2%
Population sources:
1900-2000[21] 1900-1920[22]
1900-1910[23] 1910-1930[24]
1930-1990[25] 2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 7,398 people, 3,156 households, and 1,938 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,968.4 per square mile (1,532.2 /km2). There were 3,392 housing units at an average density of 1,819.5 per square mile (702.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 78.75% (5,826) White, 14.54% (1,076) Black or African American, 0.31% (23) Native American, 1.84% (136) Asian, 0.08% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.95% (144) from other races, and 2.53% (187) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 5.37% (397) of the population.[7]

There were 3,156 households, of which 23.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 31.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.97.[7]

In the borough, 19.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.2 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $61,990 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,744) and the median family income was $74,265 (+/- $6,025). Males had a median income of $53,295 (+/- $6,313) versus $48,417 (+/- $6,580) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,361 (+/- $2,319). About 6.5% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.0% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 7,091 people, 3,004 households, and 1,853 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,586.9 people per square mile (1,382.8/km2). There were 3,219 housing units at an average density of 1,628.3 per square mile (627.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 80.99% White, 14.34% African American, 0.30% Native American, 1.40% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.41% from other races, and 1.52% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.23% of the population.[26][27]

There were 3,004 households out of which 26.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 3.02.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.3% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 33.5% from 25 to 44, 23.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.8 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $51,150, and the median income for a family was $57,192. Males had a median income of $42,910 versus $31,445 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $23,454. About 2.2% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.2% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

History[edit]

The area that is now Palmyra was settled in the late 17th century by Swedes, marking the northernmost border of New Sweden. A farmhouse built in 1761 by the third generation settlers still remains as the oldest house in Palmyra.[29] Farming was the primary use of land in Palmyra and the surrounding area until after the construction of the Camden and Amboy Railroad in 1834 with a station in the area, after which railroad workers built homes on lots they purchased along the railroad right of way. The community was originally known as Texas, but a local landowner, Isaiah Toy, a descendant of the original Swedish settlers and a stockholder in the Camden and Amboy Railroad, who wanted to have a post office established in the community and convinced the railroad to change the name of the station in 1849 to Palmyra, which came from his love of ancient history.[30] Palmyra was the name of an important city in ancient times located in central Syria.[31] The post office was established in 1851. Palmyra, along with Bordentown, Burlington, Moorestown Township, and Mount Holly Township, established its high school in the late 1890s, making it one of the oldest high schools in Burlington County and in New Jersey.[32]

The community was laid out in 1850, when Joseph Souder's land was broken up into building lots to pay his debts, with the street names matching those of Center City, Philadelphia - Market, Arch, Race, and Vine (from south to north), and Front Street and numbered streets from the Delaware River.[33] What is now Palmyra was part of Chester Township (now Maple Shade Township), which was created in 1694 and was one of the original 104 townships in New Jersey incorporated in 1798.[31] Palmyra became a part of Cinnaminson Township when that township was set off from Chester in 1860. Palmyra Township was set off from Cinnaminson in 1894, and Palmyra was incorporated as a borough in 1923.[19]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Palmyra is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[5]

As of 2013, the Mayor of Palmyra Borough is Democrat Karen Scheffler (committee chair for Communications, Negotiations, Administration & Finance, Homeowners Associations’ Liaison), whose term of office ends on December 31, 2015. Members of the Borough Council (with party affiliation, term-end year and committee chaitmanships listed in parentheses) are Council President David Dorworth (D, 2013; Public Safety and Municipal Court), Robert Bostock (D, 2015; Public Buildings, Board of Education Liaison, Business Alliance Liaison), Michele Dobbs (D, 2015; Public Works and Sewer), Howard Norcross (D, 2014; Youth and Recreation, Parks and Playgrounds), Carol Riener (D, 2014; Construction Office, Land Use Board, Shade Tree Advisory Board) and Gina Ragomo Tait (D, serving an unexpired term ending in 2013; Public Events).[34][35][36][37][38] Gina Ragomo Tait was appointed in February 2013 to serve until the November general election, filling the seat of Council President Kenneth Brahl, who had resigned during the previous month due to work and education obligations.[39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Palmyra is located in the 1st Congressional District[40] and is part of New Jersey's 7th state legislative district.[8][41][42]

New Jersey's First Congressional District is represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights).[43] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[44][45] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[46][47]

The 7th district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Diane Allen (R, Edgewater Park Township) and in the General Assembly by Herb Conaway (D, Delanco Township) and Troy Singleton (D, Palmyra).[48] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[49] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[50]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year.[51] The board choose a director and deputy director from among its seven members at an annual reorganization meeting held in January.[51] As of 2013, Burlington County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Joseph B. Donnelly (R, 2013; Cinnaminson Township),[52] Deputy Director Leah Arter (R, 2014; Moorestown Township),[53] Aimee Belgard (D, 2015; Edgewater Park Township),[54] Joseph Howarth (R, 2014; Evesham Township)[55] and Joanne Schwartz (D, 2015; Southampton Township).[56][51]

Education[edit]

The Palmyra Public Schools serves students in pre-Kindergarten through twelfth grade Palmyra, along with those from Beverly and Riverton who attend the district's high school as part of sending/receiving relationships.[57][58] Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment from the National Center for Education Statistics[59]) are Delaware Avenue Elementary School[60] (PreK; 26 students), Charles Street Elementary School[61] (K-6; 479) and Palmyra High School[62] (7-12; 426).[63]

Students from Palmyra, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[64]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 27.67 miles (44.53 km) of roadways, of which 23.04 miles (37.08 km) are maintained by the municipality, 3.11 miles (5.01 km) by Burlington County, 0.98 miles (1.58 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.54 miles (0.87 km) by the Burlington County Bridge Commission.[65]

Route 73 traverses the borough, connecting to the Tacony-Palmyra Bridge at the roadway's northern terminus[66] and intersecting with County Route 543, which is called Broad Street within Palmyra.[67]

Public transportation[edit]

East Broad Street, Palmyra, near Northern Edge of Town with RiverLINE tracks in foreground

The Palmyra station on New Jersey Transit's River Line light rail system is located on East Broad Street.[68] The station opened on March 15, 2004. Southbound service from the station is available to Camden, including a transfer to the PATCO Speedline available at the Walter Rand Transportation Center. Northbound service is available to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to New Jersey Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, and Amtrak trains.[69]

New Jersey Transit provides bus service in the borough on the 419 route that runs between Camden and Burlington.[70][71]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Palmyra include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ a b Borough Hall, Borough of Palmyra. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Palmyra, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Palmyra borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Palmyra borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012 - 2012 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 7, 2013.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 15, 2013.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Palmyra, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Palmyra, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  19. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 98. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  20. ^ Tacony-Palmyra Bridge, Delaware River Heritage Trail. Accessed June 27, 2012. "Construction began in February 1928 and the new bridge opened to traffic in August 1929, a mere 18 months and $4 million dollars later. "
  21. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed November 28, 2013.
  22. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Palmyra borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 17, 2013.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Palmyra borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 17, 2013.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Palmyra borough, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  29. ^ Bergbauer, Thomas A. "Society's cruises shed light on communities' past", Courier-Post, October 12, 2008. Accessed June 27, 2012. "The Toy Morgan House in Palmyra: The house is perhaps Palmyra's most revered historical treasure. Elias Toy, replacing an older house his grandfather built, built the house in 1761."
  30. ^ Staff. "Palmyra", Burlington County Times, March 12, 2012. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  31. ^ a b Borough of Palmyra, Delaware River Heritage Trail. Accessed June 27, 2012.
  32. ^ Siokalo, Zoriana E.; Solmssen, Clarissa; and Trimarco, Vito. Before Penn : Swedish Colonists in the land of the Lenape, (Philadelphia, PA: American Swedish Historical Museum. 1988).
  33. ^ Smith, Eileen. "A quaint river community", Courier-Post, October 19, 2006. Accessed June 27, 2012. "1850: Joseph Souder's land is divided into lots to pay his debts and the first streets are laid out."
  34. ^ Governing Body, Borough of Palmyra. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  35. ^ 2013 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Palmyra. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  36. ^ November 6, 2012 Summary Report Burlington County Amended Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  37. ^ November 8, 2011 Summary Report Burlington County Official Results, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  38. ^ 2010 Certified Burlington Co. General Election Winners, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  39. ^ McHale, Todd. New council member takes seat in Palmyra", Burlington County Times, February 20, 2013. Accessed October 30, 2013. "Gina Ragomo Tait has been called a “quiet volunteer” and a “self-starter,” and now she’s a councilwoman.... Tait took over a seat that became open after council President Kenneth Brahl resigned in January because of work commitments and his plan to continue his education at night. Her term will run until the general election in November, when she can run for the seat.
  40. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  41. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 62, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  42. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  43. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  44. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  45. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013. "Former Newark Mayor Cory Booker was sworn in as a Democratic senator from New Jersey today, taking the oath of office, exchanging hugs with Vice President Joe Biden and acknowledging the applause of friends and family members seated in the visitor's gallery that rings the chamber.... Booker, 44, was elected to fill out the term of the late Sen. Frank Lautenberg, who died earlier this year."
  46. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  47. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  48. ^ Legislative Roster 2012-2013 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 11, 2012.
  49. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  50. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  51. ^ a b c Staff. Meet the Freeholders, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  52. ^ Joseph B. Donnelly, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  53. ^ Leah Arter, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  54. ^ Aimee Belgard, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  55. ^ Joseph Howarth, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed January 5, 2013.
  56. ^ Joanne Schwartz, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed November 27, 2013.
  57. ^ Administration, Palmyra Public Schools. Accessed June 27, 2012. "Palmyra Public Schools offers a wide range of educational programs for the residents of Palmyra, Beverly City, and Riverton, New Jersey. These programs include a preschool handicapped program at Delaware Avenue Elementary School, a K-6 elementary program at Charles Street Elementary School, and a 7-12 program at Palmyra High School."
  58. ^ High School Sending Districts, Burlington County Library System, backed up by the Internet Archive as of September 27, 2006. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  59. ^ Palmyra Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  60. ^ Delaware Avenue Elementary School, Palmyra Public Schools. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  61. ^ Charles Street Elementary School, Palmyra Public Schools. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  62. ^ Palmyra High School, Palmyra Public Schools. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  63. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Palmyra Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  64. ^ Why Choose BCIT?, Burlington County Institute of Technology. Accessed November 30, 2013.
  65. ^ Salem County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  66. ^ Route 73 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, March 2009. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  67. ^ County Route 543 Straight Line Diagram, New Jersey Department of Transportation, August 2006. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  68. ^ Palmyra station, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  69. ^ River Line map, New Jersey Transit. Accessed October 30, 2013.
  70. ^ Burlington County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of January 28, 2010. Accessed November 28, 2013.
  71. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed November 28, 2013.
  72. ^ Staff. "JIM BAILEY BANKS ON FABULOUS FAKES", Philadelphia Daily News, May 13, 1983. Accessed November 26, 2013. "They moved to New Jersey when Jim was 10, and lived in Palmyra, Riverside and Willingboro before locating in Vincentown, where he visited them this week before his shore date."
  73. ^ Mchale, Todd. "Palmyra dedicates field to 'Lena' Blackburne, the man with the special mud", Burlington County Times, April 13, 2012. Accessed June 27, 2012. "PALMYRA — Russell “Lena” Blackburne made his mark in baseball like no other. Sure, the borough native played in the big leagues, but to this day, his claim to fame remains the discovery he made in 1938 in a tributary of the Delaware River not far from his home."
  74. ^ Senator John "Jack" Casey, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of February 2, 1997. Accessed June 20, 2010.
  75. ^ Frank Asbury Mathews, Jr., Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Accessed September 10, 2007.
  76. ^ Comegno, Carol. "Palmyra man will serve on Burlco bridge panel", Courier-Post, December 31, 2008. Accessed November 28, 2013. "The all-Republican county board of freeholders unanimously appointed Troy Singleton, 35, of Palmyra on Tuesday to the vacant Democratic seat on the three-member commission by a 5-0 vote."
  77. ^ "Local Titanic survivor was saved not once, but twice", April 13, 2008. Accessed June 27, 2012. "Among the survivors was crewman and ship barber August H. Weikman, who was a resident of Palmyra at the time. He survived the tragedy twice: The first was from the sinking ship itself and the second was after being mistaken for dead and zipped in a body bag."
  78. ^ Staff. "LOVE FOR SEA PREVAILS.; Chief Barber of the Titanic Obtains Post on the Lusitania.", The New York Times, August 6, 1912. Accessed June 27, 2012. "Unable to resist traveling over the sea, August F. Weikman of Palmyra, N. J., who was the chief barber on the ill-fated Titanic and who was rescued after being several hours in the water, is unable to content himself ashore."

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Riverton
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia
Succeeded by
Pennsauken Township
Camden County