Panguitch, Utah

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Panguitch, Utah
City
Panguitch Main Street
Panguitch Main Street
Location in Garfield County and state of Utah.
Location in Garfield County and state of Utah.
Coordinates: 37°49′20″N 112°26′5″W / 37.82222°N 112.43472°W / 37.82222; -112.43472Coordinates: 37°49′20″N 112°26′5″W / 37.82222°N 112.43472°W / 37.82222; -112.43472
Country United States
State Utah
County Garfield
Settled 1864
Named for Southern Paiute for 'big fish'
Government
 • Mayor Art Cooper
 • Manager Allen Henrie
Area
 • Total 1.4 sq mi (3.5 km2)
 • Land 1.4 sq mi (3.5 km2)
 • Water 0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation 6,624 ft (2,019 m)
Population (2000)
 • Total 1,623
 • Density 1,194.0/sq mi (461.0/km2)
Time zone Mountain (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) MDT (UTC-6)
ZIP code 84759
Area code(s) 435
FIPS code 49-57740[1]
GNIS feature ID 1444170[2]

Panguitch /ˈpŋɡwɪ/ is a city in and the county seat of Garfield County, Utah, United States.[3] The population was 1,623 at the 2000 census.

Geography[edit]

Panguitch is located at 37°49′20″N 112°26′5″W / 37.82222°N 112.43472°W / 37.82222; -112.43472 (37.822234, -112.434650).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.5 km²), all of it land.

Climate[edit]

Climate in this area has mild differences between highs and lows, and there is adequate rainfall year round. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is "Cfb" (Marine West Coast Climate/Oceanic climate).[5]

Climate data for Panguitch, Utah (1981–2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41.0
(5)
45.2
(7.3)
53.4
(11.9)
61.9
(16.6)
71.4
(21.9)
82.2
(27.9)
87.1
(30.6)
83.9
(28.8)
77.4
(25.2)
64.8
(18.2)
50.6
(10.3)
40.9
(4.9)
63.3
(17.4)
Average low °F (°C) 10.2
(−12.1)
14.6
(−9.7)
21.2
(−6)
26.1
(−3.3)
33.0
(0.6)
39.7
(4.3)
46.7
(8.2)
45.5
(7.5)
37.0
(2.8)
26.4
(−3.1)
17.5
(−8.1)
10.0
(−12.2)
27.3
(−2.6)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.57
(14.5)
0.59
(15)
0.67
(17)
0.57
(14.5)
0.64
(16.3)
0.49
(12.4)
1.14
(29)
1.80
(45.7)
0.98
(24.9)
1.24
(31.5)
0.75
(19)
0.46
(11.7)
9.90
(251.5)
Snowfall inches (cm) 5.6
(14.2)
5.3
(13.5)
2.1
(5.3)
0.9
(2.3)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.0
(0)
0.3
(0.8)
2.4
(6.1)
2.6
(6.6)
19.2
(48.8)
Source: NOAA[6]

History[edit]

Aerial photo of Panguitch.

Panguitch was first settled in March 1864, when Jens Nielsen, a Danish convert to the Mormon faith, led a group of pioneers eastward from Parowan and Beaver to the Sevier River. Due to the area's high elevation, 6,600 feet above sea level, the settlers' initial crops did not mature and the community suffered severely during the first harsh winter. At a crisis point, seven men left the community to seek flour and foodstuffs from surrounding communities. Heavy snow forced the abandonment of wagons and teams, and the men finished their rescue mission on foot, reportedly by laying one quilt after another upon the snow to maintain their footing. [1]

Due to a conflict with native tribes, the Black Hawk War in Utah, the community was temporarily abandoned in 1867 but was resettled in 1871. Some residents specializing in timber and livestock production were quite successful until economic shifts following World War I. Due to the establishment of Bryce Canyon National Park and the designation of nearby areas as national forests, tourism has since played a major role in the local economy.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 846
1890 1,015 20.0%
1900 883 −13.0%
1910 1,338 51.5%
1920 1,473 10.1%
1930 1,541 4.6%
1940 1,979 28.4%
1950 1,501 −24.2%
1960 1,435 −4.4%
1970 1,318 −8.2%
1980 1,343 1.9%
1990 1,444 7.5%
2000 1,623 12.4%
2010 1,520 −6.3%
Est. 2012 1,508 −0.8%

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,623 people, 502 households, and 392 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,194.0 people per square mile (460.8/km²). There were 620 housing units at an average density of 456.1 per square mile (176.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.02% White, 0.49% African American, 2.46% Native American, 0.12% Asian, 2.16% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.90% of the population.

There were 502 households out of which 40.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.3% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.9% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.05 and the average family size was 3.55.

In the city the population was spread out with 32.8% under the age of 18, 8.9% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 106.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 111.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $33,500, and the median income for a family was $39,904. Males had a median income of $28,259 versus $19,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $12,439. About 6.2% of families and 9.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.8% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

In popular culture[edit]

In the 1997 science-fiction film Contact, a fictional religious fanatic and suicide bomber named Joseph, played by Jake Busey, filmed his explanation for his death in a hotel in Panguitch, Utah.[7]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  5. ^ Climate Summary for Panguitch
  6. ^ "NOWData - NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved May 5, 2013. 
  7. ^ Latter-day Saint (Mormon) and Utah characters and references in the movie Contact (1997) and in the novel Contact, by Carl Sagan

External links[edit]