Tsimané people

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Tsimane'
Total population
2,000–2,500[1]
Regions with significant populations
 Bolivia ( Beni)
Languages
Tsimané, Spanish[2]
Religion
traditional tribal religion[2]
Related ethnic groups
Mosetén[1]

The Tsimane' (Chimane) are an indigenous people of lowland Bolivia, living in the municipalities of San Borja, San Ignacio de Moxos, Rurrenabaque, and Santa Ana de Yacuma of Beni Department.[3] The Tsimane' are the main residents of the T’simane Council Territory (Spanish: Territorio del Consejo T’simane) and the Pilón Lajas Reserve. They are a hunter-gatherer culture, although the settlements are becoming more stable.[citation needed] Those Tsimane' living in the Reserve are affiliated with the multiethnic Consejo Regional Tsimane Moseten (CRTM), which holds the title to the Reserve as a Native Community Land or TCO.[4]

Name[edit]

The Tsimane' are also known as the Achumano, Chamano, Chimanis, Chimanisa, Chimnisin, Chumano, Nawazi-Moñtji, and Ramano people.[1]

Language[edit]

The Tsimane' people speak the Tsimane' language, which is a Mosetenan language. The other Mosetenan languages are Mosetén of Santa Ana and Mosetén of Covendo (Sakel 2004).[5] It can be described as a small language family, though sometimes it also appears as a language isolate. The reason for this is that some of the variants are mutually intelligible (Sakel 2004), see also [2]

Subsistence[edit]

Tsimane' and Mosetén people fish, hunt, and farm for a living. They cultivate bananas and manioc through swidden agriculture.[2]

Health[edit]

Both The Tsimane' Amazonian Panel Study</ref</http://heller.brandeis.edu/academic/sid/tsimane/> and The Tsimane Health and Life History Project have studied the Tsimane since 2002. [6] Among other things, it appears that they do not develop heart disease as they age in the same ways as people in the developed world. [7] [8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Chimane." Countries and Their Cultures. Retrieved 2 March 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d "Tsimané." Ethnologue. Retrieved 22 Feb 2012.
  3. ^ Fundación UNIR (2009). Las identidades en las grandes regiones de Bolivia, Fascículo Nº2. La Paz, Bolivia: Fundación UNIR. pp. 19–20. 
  4. ^ Costas Monje, Patricia (January 1, 2001). "La pluriterritorialidad en el Norte de La Paz. Dos casos de estudio sobre defensa del territorio". In Chumacero, Juan. Reconfigurando territorios: Reforma agraria, control territorial y gobiernos indígenas en Bolivia. La Paz, Bolivia: Fundación Tierra. pp. 143–44. 
  5. ^ Sakel, Jeanette (2004) A grammar of Mosetén. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.
  6. ^ "The UNM-UCSB Tsimane Health and Life History Project". Retrieved 2009-08-14. 
  7. ^ Gurven, Michael; Hillard Kaplan; Jeffrey Winking; Daniel Eid Rodriguez; Sarinnapha Vasunilashorn; Jung Ki Kim; Caleb Finch; Eileen Crimmins; Henry Harpending (2009). "Inflammation and Infection Do Not Promote Arterial Aging and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Lean Horticulturalists". PLoS ONE 4 (8): e6590. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006590. PMC 2722089. PMID 19668697. Retrieved 2009-08-14. 
  8. ^ "Age Doesn't Mean Heart Disease For Bolivian Tribe". NPR. http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=111889498. Retrieved 2009-08-14.

External links[edit]