Pappy Waldorf

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Pappy Waldorf
Pappy Waldorf.jpg
Waldorf pictured in The Redskin 1930, Oklahoma A&M yearbook
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1902-10-03)October 3, 1902
Clifton Springs, New York
Died August 15, 1981(1981-08-15) (aged 78)
Berkeley, California
Playing career
1922–1924 Syracuse
Position(s) Tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1925–1927
1928
1929–1933
1934
1935–1946
1947–1956
Oklahoma City
Kansas (line)
Oklahoma A&M
Kansas State
Northwestern
California
Head coaching record
Overall 157–89–19
Bowls 0–3
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
3 Missouri Valley (1930, 1932, 1933)
1 Big Six (1934)
1 Big Ten (1936)
3 Pacific Coast (1949, 1950, 1951)
Awards
AFCA Coach of the Year (1935)
Amos Alonzo Stagg Award (1970)
College Football Hall of Fame
Inducted in 1966 (profile)

Lynn Osbert "Pappy" Waldorf (October 3, 1902 – August 15, 1981) was an American football player and coach. He served as the head coach at Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College—now Oklahoma State University–Stillwater (1929–1933), Kansas State University (1934), Northwestern University (1935–1946), and the University of California, Berkeley (1947–1956), compiling a career college football record of 157–89–19. Waldorf had the most career victories of any Cal head coach at 67 until he was surpassed in 2010 by Jeff Tedford. Waldorf was elected to the College Football Hall of Fame as a coach in 1966.

Early years[edit]

Waldorf, son of Methodist bishop Ernest Lynn Waldorf, was born in Clifton Springs, New York.[1] As a collegiate athlete, Waldorf played tackle for Syracuse University from 1922 to 1924.

Coaching career[edit]

Oklahoma A&M[edit]

Waldorf began his major college career as head football coach at Oklahoma A&M from 1929 to 1933. In his five seasons at Oklahoma A&M Waldorf went 34–10–7, won three Missouri Valley Conference championships, and never lost to arch-rival Oklahoma. In 1932, Waldorf was also promoted to Director of Athletics at the school.

Kansas State[edit]

In 1934, Waldorf replaced Bo McMillin as football coach at Kansas State. Waldorf coached K-State for only one season, 1934. They won the Big Six Conference championship, the first Big Six title in football for the school (it would be 69 years, in 2003 when the Wildcats would win their next conference title in the Big 12 Conference).

Northwestern[edit]

In 1935, Waldorf moved to Northwestern University, where he remained head coach until 1946. In his very first season at Northwestern, he was named college football's first national coach of the year. In his second season, he took Northwestern to the Big Ten Conference crown. His 12-year mark at Northwestern was 49–45–7. While at Northwestern, Waldorf also convinced future legend Otto Graham to try out for football.[2]

California[edit]

As head football coach at University of California from 1947 to 1956, Waldorf had a 67–32–4 record. For three consecutive seasons, 1949–1951, his teams were undefeated in the regular season, won the Pacific Coast Conference title, and qualified for the Rose Bowl. Waldorf had a 7–1–2 record against rival Stanford University. After retiring from Cal in 1956, he joined the San Francisco 49ers as head of personnel and scouting, remaining with the team until 1972.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Oklahoma A&M Cowboys (Missouri Valley Conference) (1929–1933)
1929 Oklahoma A&M 4–3–2 1–1 3rd
1930 Oklahoma A&M 7–2–1 2–0 T–1st
1931 Oklahoma A&M 8–2–1 1–0 2nd
1932 Oklahoma A&M 9–1–2 3–0 1st
1933 Oklahoma A&M 6–2–1 2–0 1st
Oklahoma A&M: 34–10–7 9–1
Kansas State Wildcats (Big Six Conference) (1934–1934)
1934 Kansas State 7–2–1 5–0 1st
Kansas State: 7–2–1 5–0
Northwestern Wildcats (Big Ten Conference) (1935–1946)
1935 Northwestern 4–3–1 2–3–1 5th
1936 Northwestern 7–1 6–0 1st 7
1937 Northwestern 4–4 3–3 T–4th
1938 Northwestern 4–2–2 2–1–2 4th 17
1939 Northwestern 3–4–1 3–2–1 5th
1940 Northwestern 6–2 4–2 3rd 8
1941 Northwestern 5–3 4–2 4th 11
1942 Northwestern 1–9 0–6 9th
1943 Northwestern 6–2 5–1 3rd 9
1944 Northwestern 1–7–1 0–5–1 8th
1945 Northwestern 4–4–1 3–3–1 T–4th
1946 Northwestern 4–4–1 2–3–1 T–6th
Northwestern: 49–45–7 34–31–7
California Golden Bears (Pacific Coast Conference) (1947–1956)
1947 California 9–1 5–1 2nd 15
1948 California 10–1 6–0 T–1st L Rose 4
1949 California 10–1 7–0 1st L Rose 3
1950 California 9–1–1 5–0–1 1st L Rose 4 5
1951 California 8–2 5–2 3rd 12 12
1952 California 7–3 3–3 4th
1953 California 4–4–2 2–2–2 4th
1954 California 5–5 4–3 4th
1955 California 2–7–1 1–5–1 T–7th
1956 California 3–7 2–5 8th
California: 67–32–4 40–21–4
Total: 157–89–19
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Rankings from final Coaches' Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

External links[edit]