Paradise, Kansas

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Paradise, Kansas
City
Paradise watertower, in 2005
Paradise watertower, in 2005
Location of Paradise, Kansas
Location of Paradise, Kansas
Detailed map of Paradise
Detailed map of Paradise
Coordinates: 39°6′56″N 98°55′3″W / 39.11556°N 98.91750°W / 39.11556; -98.91750Coordinates: 39°6′56″N 98°55′3″W / 39.11556°N 98.91750°W / 39.11556; -98.91750
Country United States
State Kansas
County Russell
Founded 1887
Incorporated 1924
Area[1]
 • Total 0.25 sq mi (0.65 km2)
 • Land 0.25 sq mi (0.65 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,693 ft (516 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 49
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 49
 • Density 196.0/sq mi (75.7/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 67658
Area code(s) 785
FIPS code 20-54325[4]
GNIS feature ID 0472527[5]

Paradise is a city in Russell County, Kansas, United States.[6] As of the 2010 census, the city population was 49.[7]

History[edit]

In 1859, a hunting party explored the area, including a small tributary of the Saline River which led them to a site abundant in water, timber, and bison. One of the hunters, James R. Mead, described the site as paradise, and the tributary subsequently became known as Paradise Creek. The first post office in the area opened under the name Paradise in 1875. In 1887, the Union Townsite Company established a town on the north side of the creek northwest of the post office, naming it Ivamar after Iva Marr, the daughter of a local rancher. The Paradise post office relocated to Ivamar the next year, but kept its name. As a result, the town came to be known by both names; in 1891, the Union Pacific Railroad listed its rail stop there as Paradise with Ivamar in parentheses. The community grew through the 1890s to include a school, downtown businesses, and railroad facilities, reaching a population of 200 by 1910.[8] Ivamar incorporated in 1924 and finally changed its name to Paradise.[9] The population of the community has gradually declined since the 1930s.[8]

Geography[edit]

Paradise is located at 39°6′56″N 98°55′3″W / 39.11556°N 98.91750°W / 39.11556; -98.91750 (39.115445, -98.917428)[10] at an elevation of 1,693 feet (516 m).[5] It lies in the Smoky Hills region of the Great Plains approximately 6 miles (9.7 km) north of the Saline River on the north side of Paradise Creek, a tributary of the Saline, immediately west of the creek's confluence with Eagle Creek, which runs south along the city's east side.[6][11] Located in north-central Kansas 3.5 miles (5.6 km) west of U.S. Route 281 on Kansas Highway 18 (K-18), Paradise is approximately 127 miles (204 km) northwest of Wichita, 233 miles (375 km) west of Kansas City, and 15 miles (24 km) north-northwest of Russell, the county seat.[6][11][12]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 0.25 square miles (0.65 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 178
1940 161 −9.6%
1950 145 −9.9%
1960 134 −7.6%
1970 145 8.2%
1980 89 −38.6%
1990 66 −25.8%
2000 64 −3.0%
2010 49 −23.4%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of 2009, the median income for a household in the city was $36,250, and the median income for a family was $46,250. Males had a median income of $19,688 versus $40,417 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,643. There were 5.9% of families and 3.4% of the population living below the poverty line, including 5.3% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[13]

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 census, there were 49 people, 22 households, and 13 families residing in the city. The population density was 163.3 people per square mile (63.1/km²). There were 27 housing units at an average density of 90.0 per square mile (38.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 100.0% White. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.0% of the population.[7]

There were 22 households of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.5% were married couples living together, 0.0% had a male householder with no wife present, 4.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 36.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 27.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.23, and the average family size was 2.92.[7]

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 0.0% from 18 to 24, 20.4% from 25 to 44, 28.6% from 45 to 64, and 24.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.5 years. For every 100 females, there were 81.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80 males age 18 and over.[7]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 64 people, 28 households, and 16 families residing in the city. The population density was 251.8 people per square mile (98.8/km²). There were 36 housing units at an average density of 141.6/sq mi (55.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.88% White, 1.56% Native American, and 1.56% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.56% of the population.

There were 28 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.6% were married couples living together, 7.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.3% were non-families. 39.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 21.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 18.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 106.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males.

Government[edit]

Paradise is a city of the third class with a mayor-council form of government. The city council consists of five members, and it meets on the second Wednsday of each month.[14]

Education[edit]

Paradise lies within Unified School District (USD) 399, based in nearby Natoma.[15]

Transportation[edit]

K-18, an east-west route, approaches Paradise from the northwest, then turns east north of the city. Paradise Road, a paved county road, enters the city from the south.[11]

Culture[edit]

Architecture[edit]

Paradise is home to several unique structures that were constructed from Post Rock Limestone. Early settlers to the area discovered that while there was a shortage of timber, limestone was plentiful, and therefore it was commonly used as a building material. It was also commonly used for fence posts. The watertower and the former Kennedy Hotel were recently added to the National Register of Historic Places and featured in an article in the Salina Journal.[16]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  2. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ a b c "2003-2004 Official Transportation Map". Kansas Department of Transportation. 2003. Retrieved 2010-12-12. 
  7. ^ a b c d "American FactFinder 2". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 
  8. ^ a b "Paradise Water Tower - Russell Co., Kansas". National Register of Historic Places Registration Form. National Park Service. 2006-06-15. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 
  9. ^ United States Census Bureau (1931), Fifteenth Census of the United States - Population Volume I: Number and Distribution of Inhabitants, Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, p. 418, retrieved 2011-08-05 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ a b c "General Highway Map - Russell County, Kansas". Kansas Department of Transportation. 2010-10-01. Retrieved 2010-12-12. 
  12. ^ "City Distance Tool". Geobytes. Retrieved 2010-05-14. 
  13. ^ "Paradise city, Kansas - Selected Economic Characteristics: 2005-2009". 2005-2009 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 
  14. ^ "Paradise". Directory of Kansas Public Officials. The League of Kansas Municipalities. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 
  15. ^ "Kansas Unified School Districts (map)". Kansas State Department of Education. Retrieved 2011-08-05. 
  16. ^ Unruh, Tim: "At Home In Paradise", The Salina Journal v. 147 #39

External links[edit]

City
Schools
Maps