Paradise Rock Club

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Paradise Rock Club
Paradise Rock Club, Boston MA.jpg
Former names Paradise Theater
Location Boston, Massachusetts
Coordinates 42°21′6″N 71°7′11″W / 42.35167°N 71.11972°W / 42.35167; -71.11972Coordinates: 42°21′6″N 71°7′11″W / 42.35167°N 71.11972°W / 42.35167; -71.11972
Owner Crossroads Presents
Type Club
Genre(s) Rock
Seating type General Admission (Standing)
Capacity 933
Opened September 22, 1977 (1977-09-22)
Website
www.thedise.com[1]

The Paradise Rock Club (formerly known as the Paradise Theater) is a small (933 person capacity) music venue in Boston, Massachusetts. Because of its small size, it appeals to top local rock and alternative performers as well as American bands visiting Boston for the first time (R.E.M., Steve Earle, The Double Yellow). The venue accommodates small music festivals and non music related events. The Paradise is located on the edge Boston University's campus (BU) and draws a student-based crowd. Most shows have an age requirement of eighteen or older.[2]

History[edit]

The Paradise Rock Club opened as the Paradise Theater on September 22, 1977. It was owned by Don Law Company, a Boston music giant that also controlled the Boston Garden and the Cape Cod Coliseum.[3] Don Law was a former BU student who got his start working as a promoter for the Boston band The Remains. Identifying Boston's large student population as a key music market, Law and colleague Frank Barsalona began purchasing Boston venues to capitalize on the strong local music scene and willing audience. [4]

The venue transferred hands to Live Nation, but was purchased back by Don Law and David Mugar in 2009.[5] After the purchase, Paradise was owned by Don Law, Declan Mehigan and Joe Dunne.[6] It is now owned by Law, Mehigan, Dunne and Mugar.[7] Though the Don Law Company is now Crossroads Presents, they are still prominent players in the Boston music scene and own The Paradise, the Orpheum Theater, House of Blues Boston, and the Brighton Music Hall in partnership with Live Nation.[8][9]

In 2010, Paradise Rock Club completed a three-month renovation that moved the stage fifteen feet to the left, relocated the box office to the front of the venue, demolished the bar and positioned it to the back of the venue. These renovation features provided an open view of the stage. The artist rooms were upgraded with televisions and refrigerators and were relocated to the second floor, as well as doubled in room size. The new additions to the venue were a separate space provided for opening acts, a private bathroom with a shower installed next to the newly added dressing rooms, a new washer and dryer was also included. "All the bands that come through are always looking for the nearest laundromat, so we figured, why not," says Declan Mehigan.[10]

Policies[edit]

For a list of the Paradise Rock Club policies, check here. Some include:

  • No alcohol
  • No smoking
  • No backpacks
  • Must be 18+ to enter unless otherwise noted.
  • Non-Professional cameras ARE allowed.

Notable events[edit]

The Burlington, Vermont improvisational jam band Phish played the venue seven times in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

The Irish rock band U2 played a landmark show at the Paradise Rock Club on March 6, 1981. They opened for the band Barooga Bandit and drew a crowd of five hundred people. U2's Boy album had recently risen out of England's post-punk scene and they were beginning to gain radio airplay in America. The band chose Boston as one of its first locations to promote this album.[11] The concert was recorded for their live album Live from Boston 1981.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About The Paradise Rock Club". thedise.com. Retrieved 2012-11-13. 
  2. ^ "Home / A&E / Music / Boston Globe / A venerable rock institution gets a serious makeover.". Boston.com. 2010-08-29. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  3. ^ Goodman, Fred (1997). The Mansion on the Hill: Dylan, Young, Geffen, Springsteen, and the Head-on Collision of Rock and Commerce. New York: Times: Vintage Books. p. 305. ISBN 0-679-74377-4. 
  4. ^ Goodman, Fred (1997). The Mansion on the Hill: Dylan, Young, Geffen, Springsteen, and the Head-on Collision of Rock and Commerce. New York: Times: Vintage Books. p. 24. ISBN 0-679-74377-4. 
  5. ^ "Home / News & Opinion / Local Coverage / Boston Herald / Don Law and David Mugar pick up Orpheum, Paradise, Opera House.". Bostonherald.com. 2010-08-29. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  6. ^ "Home / Entertainment / Music / Music News / Boston Herald / Makeover in Paradise Club to close for expansion.". Bostonherald.com. 2010-08-29. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  7. ^ "Home / A&E / Music / Boston Globe / A venerable rock institution gets a serious makeover.". Boston.com. 2010-08-29. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  8. ^ "Home / News & Opinion / Local Coverage / Boston music biz is booming". Bostonherald.com. 2012-01-15. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  9. ^ Law to put his stamp on House of Blues
  10. ^ "Home / A&E / Music / Boston Globe / A venerable rock institution gets a serious makeover.". Boston.com. 2010-08-29. Retrieved 2012-11-14. 
  11. ^ "The 40 greatest concerts in Boston history: 8". thephoenix.com. 2006-10-25. Retrieved 2012-11-16.