Park Ridge, New Jersey

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Park Ridge, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Park Ridge
Map highlighting Park Ridge's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Park Ridge's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Park Ridge, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Park Ridge, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°02′11″N 74°02′37″W / 41.036301°N 74.043561°W / 41.036301; -74.043561Coordinates: 41°02′11″N 74°02′37″W / 41.036301°N 74.043561°W / 41.036301; -74.043561[1][2]
Country  United States of America
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated May 15, 1894
Government[6]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Terence P. Maguire (D, term ends December 31, 2015)[3]
 • Administrator / Clerk Kelley O'Donnell[4][5]
Area[2]
 • Total 2.603 sq mi (6.740 km2)
 • Land 2.582 sq mi (6.686 km2)
 • Water 0.021 sq mi (0.054 km2)  0.79%
Area rank 368th of 566 in state
37th of 70 in county[2]
Elevation[7] 144 ft (44 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 8,645
 • Estimate (2012[11]) 8,863
 • Rank 264th of 566 in state
43rd of 70 in county[12]
 • Density 3,348.6/sq mi (1,292.9/km2)
 • Density rank 195th of 566 in state
40th of 70 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07656[13][14]
Area code(s) 201[15]
FIPS code 3400356130[16][2][17]
GNIS feature ID 0885341[18][2]
Website parkridgeboro.com

Park Ridge is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. Park Ridge had a population of 8,645 as of the 2010 United States Census,[8][9][9] reflecting a decline of 63 (-0.7%) from the 8,708 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 606 (+7.5%) from the 8,102 counted in the 1990 Census.[19]

Park Ridge was created as a borough by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on May 15, 1894, from portions of Washington Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.[20] The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone.[21] Park Ridge obtained a portion of River Vale (July 15, 1929), exchanged portions with Woodcliff Lake (December 12, 1955), received part of Washington Township (November 26, 1956), exchanged portions with Hillsdale (February 10, 1958) and Woodcliff Lake (June 9, 1958) and received another part of Washington Township (August 11, 1958).[20]

Geography[edit]

Park Ridge is located at 41°02′11″N 74°02′37″W / 41.036301°N 74.043561°W / 41.036301; -74.043561 (41.036301,-74.043561). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.603 square miles (6.740 km2), of which, 2.582 square miles (6.686 km2) of it was land and 0.021 square miles (0.054 km2) of it (0.79%) was water.[1][2]

The borough is a part of the Pascack Valley region of Bergen County. It is bounded by the boroughs of Montvale, River Vale, Woodcliff Lake and Hillsdale. Although no major highways run through the borough, it is serviced by the Garden State Parkway at exits 168, 171 and 172 in Washington Township and Montvale, respectively.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 870
1910 1,401 61.0%
1920 1,481 5.7%
1930 2,229 50.5%
1940 2,519 13.0%
1950 3,189 26.6%
1960 6,389 100.3%
1970 8,709 36.3%
1980 8,515 −2.2%
1990 8,102 −4.9%
2000 8,708 7.5%
2010 8,645 −0.7%
Est. 2012 8,863 [11] 2.5%
Population sources:
1900-1920[22] 1900-1910[23]
1910-1930[24] 1900-2010[25][26][27]
2000[28][28][29] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 8,645 people, 3,283 households, and 2,351 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,348.6 per square mile (1,292.9 /km2). There were 3,428 housing units at an average density of 1,327.8 per square mile (512.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.14% (7,706) White, 1.04% (90) Black or African American, 0.22% (19) Native American, 6.07% (525) Asian, 0.02% (2) Pacific Islander, 2.58% (223) from other races, and 0.93% (80) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 7.74% (669) of the population.[8]

There were 3,283 households of which 30.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.4% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.57 and the average family size was 3.08.[8]

In the borough, 22.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 31.1% from 45 to 64, and 19.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.2 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.[8]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $104,053 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,870) and the median family income was $118,984 (+/- $7,463). Males had a median income of $85,242 (+/- $13,024) versus $65,216 (+/- $12,814) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $46,695 (+/- $3,650). About 1.1% of families and 1.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.5% of those age 65 or over.[30]

Same-sex couples headed 11 households in 2010, an increase from the 7 counted in the 2000 Census.[31]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16], there were 8,708 people, 3,161 households, and 2,389 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,353.3 people per square mile (1,293.1/km2). There were 3,258 housing units at an average density of 1,254.6 per square mile (483.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.48% White, 0.86% African American, 0.14% Native American, 3.86% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.73% from other races, and 0.91% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.32% of the population.[28][29]

There were 3,161 households out of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.9% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.4% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.12.[28][29]

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 5.6% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 16.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 92.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.[28][29]

The median income for a household in the borough was $66,632, and the median income for a family was $97,294. Males had a median income of $71,042 versus $40,714 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $40,351. About 1.2% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.3% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.[28][29]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Park Ridge is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The governing body consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. A Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Palisades Park, the most common system used in the state, is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[32][33]

As of 2013, the mayor of the Borough of Park Ridge is Democrat Terence Maguire, whose term of office ends December 31, 2015. Members of the Park Ridge Borough Council are Council President Keith Misciagna (D, 2013), Richard Bosi (D, 2014), Scott Galdi (D, 2014), Steve Hopper (R, 2015), Ann Kilmartin (D, 2013) and Robert Oppelt (D, 2015).[34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Park Ridge is located in the 5th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 39th state legislative district.[9][44][45]

New Jersey's Fifth Congressional District is represented by Scott Garrett (R, Wantage Township).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[47][48] and Bob Menendez (D, North Bergen).[49][50]

The 39th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Gerald Cardinale (R, Demarest) and in the General Assembly by Holly Schepisi (R, River Vale) and Bob Schroeder (R, Washington Township, Bergen County).[51] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[52] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[53]

Bergen County is governed by a directly elected County Executive, with legislative functions performed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders.[54] The County Executive is Kathleen Donovan (R, Rutherford; term ends December 31, 2014).[55] The seven freeholders are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with two or three seats coming up for election each year, with a Chairman, Vice Chairman and Chairman Pro Tempore selected from among its members at a reorganization meeting held each January.[56] As of 2013, Bergen County's Freeholders are Freeholder Chairman David L. Ganz (D, 2014; Fair Lawn),[57] Vice Chairwoman Joan Voss (D, 2014; Fort Lee),[58] Chairman Pro Tempore John A. Felice (R, 2016; River Edge),[59] Maura R. DeNicola (R, 2016; Franklin Lakes),[60] Steve Tanelli (D, 2015; North Arlington)[61] and Tracy Silna Zur (D, 2015; Franklin Lakes).[61][62] Countywide constitutional officials are Sheriff Michael Saudino (R), Surrogate Michael R. Dressler (D, Cresskill) and County Clerk John S. Hogan (D, Northvale).[63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 5,800 registered voters in Park Ridge, of which 1,462 (25.2% vs. 31.7% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 1,503 (25.9% vs. 21.1%) were registered as Republicans and 2,832 (48.8% vs. 47.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 3 voters registered to other parties.[64] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 67.1% (vs. 57.1% in Bergen County) were registered to vote, including 87.0% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 73.7% countywide).[64][65]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 2,682 votes here (57.0% vs. 43.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 1,957 votes (41.6% vs. 54.8%) and other candidates with 43 votes (0.9% vs. 0.9%), among the 4,708 ballots cast by the borough's 6,080 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.4% (vs. 70.4% in Bergen County).[66][67]In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 2,735 votes here (55.8% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 2,093 votes (42.7% vs. 53.9%) and other candidates with 35 votes (0.7% vs. 0.8%), among the 4,901 ballots cast by the borough's 6,049 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.0% (vs. 76.8% in Bergen County).[68][69] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 2,697 votes here (57.4% vs. 47.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 1,963 votes (41.7% vs. 51.7%) and other candidates with 34 votes (0.7% vs. 0.7%), among the 4,702 ballots cast by the borough's 5,785 registered voters, for a turnout of 81.3% (vs. 76.9% in the whole county).[70]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 1,906 votes here (55.4% vs. 45.8% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 1,317 votes (38.3% vs. 48.0%), Independent Chris Daggett with 162 votes (4.7% vs. 4.7%) and other candidates with 21 votes (0.6% vs. 0.5%), among the 3,443 ballots cast by the borough's 5,928 registered voters, yielding a 58.1% turnout (vs. 50.0% in the county).[71]

Economy[edit]

The Hertz Corporation, a car rental company, is headquartered in Park Ridge and is the borough's largest single taxpayer. On May 7, 2013, Hertz announced that they were moving their corporate HQ to Estero, Florida. They do though plan on keeping certain operations in Park Ridge.[72]

Sony Corporation of America maintains an R&D and engineering facility in Park Ridge.[73]

Education[edit]

The Park Ridge Public Schools serve students in prekindergarten through twelfth grade. Schools in the district (with 2010-11 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[74]) are East Brook Elementary School[75] (grades PreK-6; 348 students) and West Ridge Elementary School[76] (K-6; 347), Park Ridge High School[77] (7-12; 587).[78] The high school was the 14th-ranked public high school in New Jersey (third highest in Bergen County) out of 328 schools statewide in New Jersey Monthly magazine's September 2012 cover story on the state's "Top Public High Schools", after being ranked 18th in 2010 out of 322 schools listed.[79]

Public school students from the borough, and all of Bergen County, are eligible to attend the secondary education programs offered by the Bergen County Technical Schools, which include the Bergen County Academies in Hackensack, and the Bergen Tech campus in Teterboro or Paramus. The district offers programs on a shared-time or full-time basis, with admission based on a selective application process and tuition covered by the student's home school district.[80][81]

Our Lady of Mercy Academy is a K-8 Catholic school which operates in Park Ridge under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Newark.[82][83]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

The borough had a total of 38.91 miles (62.62 km) of roadways, of which 31.94 miles (51.40 km) are maintained by the municipality and 6.97 miles (11.22 km) by Bergen County.[84]

County Route 503, which runs for 18 miles (29 km) from Route 4 to the New York State border, passes through Park Ridge. It is well known and posted as Kinderkamack Road, which was a trail used by the Lenape Native Americans, whose named signified that it was a place (the suffix "ack") where ceremonial dances or prayers ("kintekaye") were made.[85]

Public transportation[edit]

Park Ridge is served by New Jersey Transit on the Pascack Valley Line at the Park Ridge train station.[86] The station is located at Hawthorne and Park Avenues though is also accessible from Broadway.

This line runs north-south to Hoboken Terminal with connections via the Secaucus Junction transfer station to New Jersey Transit one-stop service to New York Penn Station and to other NJ Transit rail service. Connections are available at the Hoboken Terminal to other New Jersey Transit rail lines, the PATH train at the Hoboken PATH station, New York Waterways ferry service to the World Financial Center and other destinations and Hudson-Bergen Light Rail service.

The Rockland Coaches route 11C provides service to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station[87] and the 11T/11AT to the Port Authority Bus Terminal.[88][89]

PKRG-TV[edit]

PKRG-TV, the public-access television cable TV station in Park Ridge has produced and documented many shows over the past ten years. They continue to produce a weekly live show every Monday night in addition to broadcasting special events in the town such as parades, sporting events, school plays, and charity events. Rolf Wahl, a borough resident, was the man who provided most of the guidance, technical knowledge and foresight for the station. The television studio also hosted a "series" of shows entitled Behind The Badge which provided residents with an insight into the way the police department works. It included a tour of the police station and police cruiser and also an overview of programs the department works on to improve the welfare of the community, e.g. anti-drug programs and computer crime awareness.[90]

The Bear's Nest[edit]

The Bear's Nest is a luxury gated community in Park Ridge. It has town house type style houses with luxury amenities including (in some houses) elevators. There is also a community house available for party rental, a pool, and multiple tennis courts.[91] Notable people of the development have included President Richard M. Nixon, Mrs. Pat Nixon, Raymond V. Gilmartin, current Microsoft board member, former chairman, president and chief executive officer, Merck & Co., Inc, and Tom Coughlin, coach of the New York Giants.

Emergency services[edit]

Park Ridge is one of the three towns involved with the Tri-Boro Volunteer Ambulance Corps which provides EMS service to Park Ridge, Woodcliff Lake and Montvale. Tri-Boro is a non-profit group which provides free emergency service to those in the community who need it at any time. The headquarters is located in Park Ridge near Mill Pond.[92]

Park Ridge has a paid Police Department, which has been led by Chief Joseph J. Madden since 2007.[93] The Park Ridge Volunteer Fire Department dates back to 1898, created by community volunteers after a major fire destroyed a local factory.[94]

Museum[edit]

Park Ridge's Pascack Historical Society Museum, at 19 Ridge Avenue, houses the world's only wampum drilling machine. This wooden artifact was made in Park Ridge by the Campbell Brothers who invented a way to drill through long pieces of hair pipe shells so that they could be strung and worn as breast plates by the Plains Indians, among others. Needing water for the operation, the industrious brothers leased a woolen mill that stood on the Pascack Brook. When that burned down they built their own mill farther down Pascack Creek on their land another shop on Pascack Road near their homestead. Both building housed drilling machines on their second floors where they were safe from prying eyes, as the two machines had not been patented. In the early 19th century, John Jacob Astor purchased wampum from the Campbells to trade with the Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest whose beaver pelts he turned into men's hats.[95] The best years for the wampum business were between 1835 and 1866. The drilling machine can be seen at the Pascack Historical Society Museum on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. until noon and Sundays from 1-4 p.m. Admission is free.

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Park Ridge include:

Historic sites[edit]

Park Ridge is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
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  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 13, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Administrator, Borough of Park Ridge. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Park Ridge. Accessed July 3, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 165.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Park Ridge, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Park Ridge borough, Bergen County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 3, 2012.
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  10. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Park Ridge borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed July 3, 2012.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Park Ridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 26, 2011.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 29, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Park Ridge, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 29, 2013.
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  41. ^ Burger, Kathryn A. "Official election results confirm Hopper, Oppelt as winners", Pascack Valley Community Life, November 29, 2012. Accessed August 13, 2013. "According to the official results of the Nov. 6 election, Steven Hopper and Robert Oppelt were the top vote-getters for two, three-year terms on the Park Ridge Borough Council.... The final tallies were: Hopper (R) – 2,177; Oppelt (D) – 2,147; Fenwick (R) – 2,126; Metzdorf (D) – 2,038."
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