Parkdale—High Park

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For the provincial electoral district, see Parkdale—High Park (provincial electoral district).
Parkdale—High Park
Flag of Ontario.svg Ontario electoral district
Parkdale High Park.png
Parkdale—High Park in relation to the other Toronto ridings
Federal electoral district
Legislature House of Commons
MP
 
 
 
Peggy Nash
New Democratic
District created 1976
First contested 1979
Last contested 2011
District webpage profile, map
Demographics
Population (2011) 107,035
Electors (2011) 71,954
Area (km²) 16
Pop. density (per km²) 6,689.7
Census divisions Toronto
Census subdivisions Toronto
Map of Parkdale-High Park

Parkdale—High Park is a federal electoral district in Ontario, Canada, that has been represented in the Canadian House of Commons since 1979. It was created during the 1976 electoral boundaries redistribution from parts of Parkdale, High Park—Humber Valley, Davenport and Spadina districts. As of the May 2, 2011, Canadian general election, the current Member of Parliament (MP) is New Democratic Party (NDP) member Peggy Nash.

Geography[edit]

It is located in the central-west part of Toronto on the lakefront. It has 106,559 residents. It is composed of the seven neighbourhoods surrounding High Park. Including the park and portions west, between the north and south borders of the park is the neighbourhood of Swansea; north of the park are the neighbourhoods of High Park North and the south half of The Junction; north-west of the park are the neighbourhoods of Runnymede-Bloor West Village and Lambton Baby Point; to the east of the park is Roncesvalles; and Parkdale directly to the south and to the south-east.[1]

It consists of the part of the City of Toronto bounded on the south by Lake Ontario, on the west by the Humber River, and on the north and east by a line drawn from the Humber River east along the Canadian Pacific Railway, southeast along the Canadian National/Canadian Pacific Railway, west along Queen Street West, south along Dufferin Street, west along Dufferin Street, and south along the southerly production of Spencer Avenue.[2]

History[edit]

The riding was created in 1976 from parts of Parkdale, High Park—Humber Valley, Davenport and Spadina ridings.[2]

In 1976, it was defined to consist of the part of the City of Toronto bounded on the south by the shore of Lake Ontario, on the north and west by the city limits, on the east by a line drawn from north to south along Runnymede Road, east along Annette Street, south along Keele Street, east along Humberside Avenue, southeast along the Canadian National Railway, south along Bathurst Street; thence southerly along Bathurst Street to the Western Channel of Toronto Harbour.[2]

In 1987, it was defined to consist of the parts of the cities of Toronto and York bounded on the west by the city limits of Toronto and York, and on the north, east and south by a line drawn east along the Canadian Pacific Railway line, south along Runnymede Road, east along Annette Street, southeast along Dundas Street West, east along Dupont Street, southwest along the Canadian National Railway line immediately east of Dundas Street West, south along Atlantic Avenue, west along the Gardiner Expressway, south along the southerly production of Spencer Avenue.[2]

In 1996, it was defined to consist of the parts of the cities of Toronto and York bounded on the west by the city limits of Toronto and York, and on the north, east and south by a line drawn east along the Canadian Pacific Railway, southeast along the Canadian National Railway, south along Atlantic Avenue, west along the Gardiner Expressway, and south along the southerly production of Spencer Avenue.[2]

In 2003, it was given its current boundaries as described above.

Members of Parliament[edit]

This riding has elected the following Members of Parliament:

Parliament Years Member Party
31st 1979–1980     Jesse Flis Liberal
32nd 1980–1984
33rd 1984–1988     Andrew Witer Progressive Conservative
34th 1988–1993     Jesse Flis Liberal
35th 1993–1997
36th 1997–2000     Sarmite Bulte Liberal
37th 2000–2004
38th 2004–2006
39th 2006–2008     Peggy Nash New Democratic
40th 2008–2011     Gerard Kennedy Liberal
41st 2011–present     Peggy Nash New Democratic

Former boundaries[edit]

Election results[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp Expenditures
New Democratic Peggy Nash 24,046 47.20 +11.23
Liberal Gerard Kennedy 16,757 32.89 -10.08
Conservative Taylor Train 7,924 15.55 +3.12
Green Sarah Newton 1,666 3.27 -4.20
Christian Heritage Andrew Borkowski 251 0.49 +0.02
Marijuana Terry Parker 215 0.42 -0.01
Marxist–Leninist Lorne Gershuny 86 0.17 -0.05
Total valid votes/Expense limit 50,945 100.00
Total rejected ballots 216 0.42 0.00
Turnout 51,161 71.10 6.50
Eligible voters 71,954
Former Liberal leadership hopeful Gerard Kennedy challenged incumbent MP Peggy Nash in the 2008 federal election.
Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp Expenditures
Liberal Gerard Kennedy 20,705 42.97 +7.04 $66,616
New Democratic Peggy Nash 17,332 35.97 -4.43 $76,005
Conservative Jilian Saweczko 5,992 12.43 -4.62 $27,886
Green Robert L. Rishchynski 3,601 7.47 +1.96 $27,025
Christian Heritage Andrew Borkowski 230 0.47 $402
Marijuana Terry Parker 209 0.43 -0.17
Marxist–Leninist Lorne Gershuny 110 0.22 -0.02
Total valid votes/Expense limit 48,179 100.00 $82,121
Total rejected ballots 205 0.42 -0.04
Turnout 48,384 64.60 -5.73
Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
New Democratic Peggy Nash 20,790 40.40 +5.9
Liberal Sarmite Bulte 18,489 35.93 -6.1
Conservative Jurij Klufas 8,777 17.05 +1.7
Green Robert L. Rishchynski 2,840 5.51 -1.4
Marijuana Terry Parker 311 0.60 -0.2
Marxist–Leninist Lorne Gershuny 124 0.24 0.0
Independent Beverly Bernardo 119 0.23
Total valid votes 51,450 100.00
Total rejected ballots 240 0.46 -0.07
Turnout 51,690 70.33 +6.19
Canadian federal election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Sarmite Bulte 19,727 42.05 -7.3
New Democratic Peggy Nash 16,201 34.53 +15.5
Conservative Jurij Klufas[Note 1] 7,221 15.39 -9.8
Green Neil Spiegel 3,249 6.92 +4.1
Marijuana Terry Parker 384 0.81 -1.1
Marxist–Leninist Lorne Gershuny 130 0.27 0.0
Total valid votes 46,912 100.00
Total rejected ballots 250 0.53
Turnout 47,162 64.14
Canadian federal election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Sarmite Bulte 20,676 49.4 +1.1
New Democratic Paul Schmidt 7,947 19.0 -1.5
Progressive Conservative David Strycharz 5,681 13.6 -0.3
Alliance Vicki Vancas[Note 2] 4,882 11.7 -2.1
Green Neil Spiegel 1,161 2.8 +1.2
Marijuana Terry Parker 775 1.9
Canadian Action Greg Robertson 317 0.8 0.0
Communist Wilfred Szczesny 155 0.4
Independent Michel Dugré 132 0.3
Marxist–Leninist Lorne Gershuny 122 0.3 -0.4
Total valid votes 41,848 100.0


Canadian federal election, 1997
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Sarmite Bulte 20,692 48.3 -6.1
New Democratic Paul Schmidt 8,762 20.4 +11.1
Progressive Conservative Jilian Saweczko 5,926 13.8 +0.2
Reform Michael Jakubcak 5,881 13.7 -2.4
Green Laura Weinberg 696 1.6 +0.5
Canadian Action Miriam Hawkins 324 0.8
Marxist–Leninist Pierre Chénier 311 0.7 +0.6
Natural Law Gregory Wayne Roberts] 267 0.6 -0.3
Total valid votes 42,859 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1993
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Jesse Flis 22,068 54.4 +10.5
Reform Lee Primeau 6,520 16.1
Progressive Conservative Don Baker 5,519 13.6 -23.2
New Democratic David Miller 3,775 9.3 -8.6
National Stephen A. Biega 1,308 3.2
Green Richard Roy 461 1.1
Natural Law Wanda Beaver 369 0.9
Libertarian Haig Baronikian 314 0.8 +0.2
Independent Miguel Figueroa 105 0.3 0.0
Abolitionist Thomas Earl Pennington 60 0.1
Marxist–Leninist André Vachon 53 0.1
Total valid votes 40,552 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1988
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Jesse Flis 19,614 43.9 +7.4
Progressive Conservative Andrew Witer 16,418 36.8 -3.5
New Democratic Anna Pollonetsky 8,002 17.9 -2.9
Libertarian Penny Hoar 267 0.6
Independent [Matthew Hall 227 0.5 -0.1
Communist Anna Larsen 130 0.3
Total valid votes 44,658 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1984
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Progressive Conservative Andrew Witer 15,879 40.2 +8.2
Liberal Jesse Flis 14,419 36.5 -9.0
New Democratic John Friesen 8,232 20.9 -0.6
Green Dieter Heinrich 592 1.5
Libertarian Wilf Olin 223 0.6 +0.2
Commonwealth of Canada Anna Larsen 130 0.3
Total valid votes 39,475 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1980
Party Candidate Votes % ±pp
Liberal Jesse Flis 17,213 45.6 +7.9
Progressive Conservative Andrew Witer 12,116 32.1 -5.4
New Democratic Doug Little 8,094 21.4 -2.1
Communist Wilfred Szczesny 160 0.4 0.0
Libertarian Shirley Yamada 146 0.4 -0.2
Marxist–Leninist Christine Nugent 55 0.1 0.0
Total valid votes 37,784 100.0
Canadian federal election, 1979
Party Candidate Votes %
Liberal Jesse Flis 15,281 37.7
Progressive Conservative Yuri Shymko 15,207 37.5
New Democratic Doug Little 9,539 23.5
Libertarian Vincent H. Miller 250 0.6
Communist Kerry McQuaig 168 0.4
Independent Armand Siksna 61 0.2
Marxist–Leninist Christine Nugent 52 0.1
Total valid votes 40,558 100.0

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Conservative vote is compared to the total of the Canadian Alliance vote and Progressive Conservative vote in 2000 election.
  2. ^ Canadian Alliance vote is compared to the Reform vote in 1997 election.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ "Toronto Neighbourhood Profiles - Map". Toronto. 2008-12-05. Retrieved 2008-12-05. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "History of Federal Ridings since 1867:PARKDALE—HIGH PARK, Ontario (1979—)". Parliament of Canada. Ottawa: The Queen's Printer for Canada. 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-12-30. Retrieved 2011-12-30. 

References[edit]

External links[edit]