Parker Johnstone

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Parker Johnstone III (born March 27, 1958) is a former race car driver and motorsports announcer from Redmond, Oregon. An accomplished musician, he was the principal trumpet of the International Youth Orchestra, touring Europe, playing with Herbert von Karajan and the Berlin Philharmonic, and famed pianist Van Cliburn. Instead of attending Juilliard School of Music, he went to the engineering school at the University of California, Berkeley, where he received his degree in 1982.

Early career[edit]

He began his amateur racing career while in high school while working as a systems programmer in Silicon Valley part time to pay for his new hobby, racing automobiles. Winning at SCCA events, he worked as an instructor at the Bob Bondurant School of High Performance Driving after college. He continued to win while driving Corvettes and import sedans. Honda hired him to drive during the 1984 season. He won numerous events in the IMSA Firehawk series. He finished 2nd in the Renault Cup National Championship in 1984, earning a spot with the factory Renault team to race in Europe. He returned to the United States to win the Renault Cup championship in 1985. In 1986 he won the SCCA National Road Racing Championship driving for Honda in GT-4. He also won IMSA championships in International Sedan for Acura in 1987 and 1988. In 1987 he was also the rookie of the year in the pro-Formula Atlantic division. He won the IMSA Camel Lights sports car championship 3 years in a row, from 1991 to 1993, setting all-time qualifying and race win records, including winning the 24 Hours of Daytona twice, the 12 Hours of Sebring, and 1000km Suzuka event in Japan. He finished second in both 1989 and 1990 in the IMSA International Sedan Championship.

CART[edit]

A road course specialist, he drove in mainly road course races in the 1994 and 1995 CART/IndyCar seasons for Comptech Racing. Significantly, in his oval debut at the Michigan 500 in 1995, he qualified on the pole with a new track record, giving Honda its first ever champ car pole position. He dominated the race until sidelined with a mechanical problem. In 1995, he also set the closed course world speed record in excess of 238 mph. He then moved up and ran the full season in 1996. For 1997, he moved to Team Green Racing. Although he led several IndyCar races, his best CART finish was a second place that came in 1996 at the Long Beach Grand Prix.

Retirement[edit]

After he retired from professional racing, Parker became the color analyst commentator for ABC's/ESPN's coverage of IndyCar/CART racing. When ESPN stopped covering IndyCar/CART he was moved to cover the pit action and work as the technical pit analyst for the NHRA coverage. After three years of covering the NHRA Drag Racing Championship, he left broadcasting to oversee and operate Parker Johnstone's Wilsonville Honda in Wilsonville, Oregon. Several of his historically significant race cars are on display there. He is an Eagle Scout. He is an instrument, commercial, certified flight instructor pilot and has competed and won in aerobatic competitions. He is scuba certified. He has appeared in over 50 TV commercials as well as performed as a stuntman in the movie Speed. He is a member of both the Screen Actors Guild (SAG) and the American Ferderation of Television and Radio Artists (AFTRA). Currently he competes in triathlons and cycling races. 2006 marked his first full year of cycling competition in which he won twice. He lives in Wilsonville where he is a member of the city's board on parks. He also serves on the board of directors for the Children's Cancer Association.[1]

Racing record[edit]

American Open Wheel[edit]

(key)

CART[edit]

Year Team 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Rank Points
1994 Comptech Australia
SRF
United States
PHX
United States
LBH
United States
IND
United States
MIL
United States
DET
United States
POR
19
United States
CLE
17
Canada
TOR
Ret
United States
MIS
United States
MDO
23
United States
NHM
Canada
VAN
13
United States
ROA
United States
NZR
United States
LS
17
35th 0
1995 Comptech United States
MIA
Australia
SRF
United States
PHX
United States
LBH
United States
NZR
United States
IND
United States
MIL
United States
DET
Ret
United States
POR
United States
ROA
12
Canada
TOR
United States
CLE
11
United States
MIS
Ret
United States
MDO
Ret
United States
NHM
Canada
VAN
11
United States
LS
17
27th 6
1996 Comptech United States
MIA
DNS
Brazil
RIO
Ret
Australia
SRF
Ret
United States
LBH
2
United States
NZR
20
United States
500
Ret
United States
MIL
16
United States
DET
14
United States
POR
5
United States
CLE
Ret
Canada
TOR
Ret
United States
MIS
Ret
United States
MDO
Ret
United States
ROA
Ret
Canada
VAN
11
United States
LS
13
17th 33
1997 Green United States
MIA
8
Australia
SRF
Ret
United States
LBH
5
United States
NZR
Ret
Brazil
RIO
12
United States
STL
7
United States
MIL
Ret
United States
DET
Ret
United States
POR
9
United States
CLE
10
Canada
TOR
12
United States
MIS
Ret
United States
MDO
12
United States
ROA
Ret
Canada
VAN
11
United States
LS
12
United States
FON
11
16th 36

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johnson, Patrick (May 27, 2009). "Prisoners counted in city population". Wilsonville Sokesman. Retrieved 2009-06-26. 

External links[edit]