Parkway Villages, Houston

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Parkway Villages is a 577-lot,[1] 224-acre (91 ha) subdivision in western Houston, Texas.[2] It is located north of Lakes of Parkway, the former Barnhardt land tract.[3] It was the first single family housing development by Sueba USA,[4] a subsidiary of Süba Freie Baugesellschaft,[5]

History[edit]

The project's development began in 1993.[2] It was developed in a joint venture between Sueba USA and Hypo Bank of Munich. It was built in an area that was originally supposed to have a 563-acre (228 ha) office park. That office park, which had been developed for about $70 million,[4] was not built due to the 1980s oil bust. Michael Baldwin of Sueba stated that originally, the buyers of houses in Parkway Village were retirees.[6] The original plan called for 464 lots.[4] From February to October 1993, the first 43 houses in the development were sold.[4]

Ralph Bivins of the Houston Chronicle wrote that this subdivision "was key to Sueba's winning the Developer of the Year award from the Greater Houston Builders Association."[2] By 2002 the building of houses was almost complete. In 2002 Bivins stated that Lakes of Parkway was "one of the largest communities to be developed inside city limits in recent years."[2] Development of houses in the subdivision ended in 2003.[1]

Cityscape[edit]

In 1993 Michael W. Baldwin, the sales manager, stated that the housing prices will have the range $200,000 ($326514.63 with inflation) to $800,000 ($1306058.51 with inflation).[4]

Education[edit]

The community is located in the Houston Independent School District. Two schools, Barbara Bush Elementary School and West Briar Middle School, are located in the community.[6] Residents are zoned to Bush,[7] West Briar,[8] and Westside High School.[9]

In 2003 Baldwin stated that the typical buyer in Parkway Villages is a family attracted to the area schools.[6]

Bush opened in 1992.[10] Westside opened in August 2000.[11] West Briar, a name combining those of Westheimer Road and Briar Forest, opened in 2002.[12] Previously residents were zoned to Revere Middle School,[13] and Lee High School.[14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Completed" (Archive) Sueba USA. Retrieved on May 1, 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d Bivins, Ralph. "Bivins: German group adds to its influence in west Houston." Houston Chronicle. February 24, 2002. Retrieved on April 30, 2014.
  3. ^ Bivins, Ralph. "Sueba USA acquires land for housing." Houston Chronicle. Thursday June 24, 1993. Business p. 1. Available from NewsBank, Record Number: 06*24*1137595. Anyone with a Houston Public Library card may read this article over the internet.
  4. ^ a b c d e Stuart, Lettice. "Subdivisions for Houston's Ghostly Business Parks." The New York Times. October 10, 1993. Retrieved on April 30, 2014.
  5. ^ Bivins, Ralph. "Sueba on the move - Developer plans five new projects this year." Houston Chronicle. Sunday June 27, 1993. Business p. 6. Available from NewsBank, Record Number: 06*27*1137991. Anyone with a Houston Public Library card may read this article over the internet.
  6. ^ a b c Feser, Katherine. "Unusual luck created cluster of gated villages." Houston Chronicle. Sunday August 24, 2003. Retrieved on April 30, 2014.
  7. ^ "Bush Elementary Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  8. ^ "West Briar Middle Attendance Zone." Houston Independent School District.
  9. ^ "Westside High School Attendance Zone," Houston Independent School District.
  10. ^ "Elementary Schools (A-J)" (Archive). Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.
  11. ^ "High Schools" (Archive). Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.
  12. ^ "Middle Schools" (Archive). Houston Independent School District. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.
  13. ^ "MID98.HTM" (Archive). Houston Independent School District. December 14, 2001. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.
  14. ^ "HIGH98.HTM" (Archive). Houston Independent School District. April 13, 2002. Retrieved on May 11, 2014.