Parliamentary inquiry

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Parliamentary inquiry (RONR)
Class Incidental motion
In order when another has the floor? Yes
Requires second? No
Debatable? No
Amendable? No
Vote required: Is not voted on, but is responded to by chair

A parliamentary inquiry is a question directed to the presiding officer of a deliberative assembly to obtain information on a matter of parliamentary law or the rules of the organization bearing on the business at hand. The primary purpose is to enable members to obtain the chair's guidance on parliamentary matters about which they are uncertain.[1]

A parliamentary inquiry is sometimes used as a tactful alternative to a call for the orders of the day, or a point of order.[1]

Mason's Manual of Legislative Procedure notes, "It is not, however, the presiding officer's duty to answer general questions concerning parliamentary law."[2] Per RONR, the chair is also not obligated to answer hypothetical questions. This motion is made by saying, "Mr. Chairman, I rise to a parliamentary inquiry."[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gondin, William R. (1969). Dictionary of Parliamentary Procedure. p. 89. 
  2. ^ National Conference of State Legislatures (2000). Mason's Manual of Legislative Procedure, 2000 ed., p. 192
  3. ^ Robert, Henry M. (2000). Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised, 11th ed., p. 293–294