List of Parma F.C. statistics and records

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This list encompasses the major honours won by and records set by Parma F.C., their managers and their players, an Italian professional football club currently playing in Serie A and based in Parma, Emilia-Romagna. The player records section includes details of the club's leading goalscorers and those who have made most appearances in first-team competitions. It also records notable achievements by Parma players on the international stage, and the highest transfer fees paid and received by the club and details Parma's achievements in major competitions. Although Parma have never won a domestic league title, they have won three Italian Cups, one Supercoppa Italiana, as well as two UEFA Cups, one European Super Cup and one UEFA Cup Winners' Cup. The club won all eight of these trophies between 1992 and 2002, a period in which it is also achieved its best ever league finish as runners-up in the 1996–97 season.

Statistics accurate as of 3 July 2014

Honours[edit]

Parma have won eight major titles in their history, with all eight coming in the space of ten years between 1992 and 2002.[1] The only two major honours that Parma are yet to win are the Serie A title and the UEFA Champions League, the most prestigious domestic and continental competitions, respectively. Perhaps reflecting this, Parma are one of just four clubs worldwide who have won a major European trophy without having also won a national league title, along with West Ham United, Real Zaragoza and Bayer Leverkusen. The club were also the only side to represent Italy in European competition for every year between 1991 and 2005.

National[edit]

European[edit]

Minor[edit]

  • Seconda Divisione:
    • Winners (1): 1924–25[nb 2]
  1. ^ At the time, this was one of 3 parallel regional second tier divisions.
  2. ^ At the time, this was one of 2 parallel regional second tier divisions.
  3. ^ At the time, this was one of 13 parallel regional second tier divisions.
  4. ^ At the time, this was one of 3 parallel regional third tier divisions.
  5. ^ a b c At the time, this was one of 2 parallel regional third tier divisions.
  6. ^ At the time, this was one of 12 parallel regional third tier divisions.
  7. ^ At the time, this was one of 9 parallel regional fourth tier divisions.
  8. ^ Parma competed as a representative of Italy

Friendly Tournaments[edit]

Players[edit]

All current players are in bold.

Appearances[edit]

Antonio Benarrivo heads the all-time appearances list in Serie A and European competitions and is the only player who was at the club for all eight major trophy victories, but Ivo Cocconi holds the appearance record for all league competitions, playing for over a decade with the bulk of his appearance in the 1950s.

Most league appearances[edit]

Name Years Apps
1 Italy Ivo Cocconi 1950–1962 308[2]
2 Italy Ermes Polli 1958–1969 307[2]
3 Italy Luigi Apolloni 1987–2000 304[2]
4 Italy Lorenzo Minotti 1990–1996 280[2]
5 Italy Antonio Benarrivo 1991–2004 258[3]
6 Italy Giovanni Mazzoni 1922–? 248[2]
7 Italy Giovanni Colonnelli ? 242
8 Italy Alessandro Melli 1985–1994
1995–1997
241[4]
9 Italy Augusto Ponticelli ? 238
10 Italy Fabio Cannavaro 1995–2002 212

Most European appearances[edit]

Name Years Apps
1 Italy Antonio Benarrivo 1991–2004 58[5]
2 Argentina Roberto Sensini 1994–1999
2001–2002
47
3 Italy Fabio Cannavaro 1995–2002 46
4 Italy Dino Baggio 1994–2001 43
5 Italy Lilian Thuram 1996–2001 38
6 Italy Luca Bucci 1986–1987
1988–1990
1993–1997
2005–2008
37
7 Italy Gianluigi Buffon 1995–2001 36
8 Italy Luigi Apolloni 1987–2000 35
9 Italy Massimo Crippa 1993-1998 33
10 Italy Lorenzo Minotti 1987–1996 32

Goalscorers[edit]

Top scorers[edit]

Name Years Goals (Apps) Gl/App
1 Argentina Hernán Crespo 1996–2000
2010–2012
94 (201)[7] 0.47
2 Italy William Bronzoni 1945–1953 78 (201)[8] 0.39
3 Italy Gianfranco Zola 1993–1996 67[8]

Top league scorers[edit]

Name Years Goals (Apps) Gl/App
1 Italy William Bronzoni[9] 1945–1953 78 (201) 0.39
2 Argentina Hernán Crespo[3] 1996–2000
2010–2012
72 (162) 0.44
3 Italy Luciano Degara 1941–1943 62 (53) 1.17
4 Italy Alessandro Melli 1985–1994
1995–1997
56 (241) 0.23[4]
5 Italy Stocchi Pre-WWII 52
6 Italy Alberto Gilardino 2002–2005 50 (96) 0.52
7 Czech Republic Július Korostelev 1951–1956 49 (113) 0.43
7 Italy Alberto Rizzati 1972–1974
1975–1977
49 (107) 0.46
7 Italy Gianfranco Zola 1993–1996 49 (102) 0.48
10 Italy Fabio Bonci 1971–1972
1974–1975
1978–1980
44 (120) 0.37

Top European scorers[edit]

Name Years Goals (Apps) Gl/App
1 Italy Enrico Chiesa[5] 1996–1999 16 (18) 0.89
2 Argentina Hernán Crespo 1996–2000
2010–2012
11 (21) 0.52
3 Italy Marco Di Vaio 1999–2002 11 (25) 0.44
4 Colombia Faustino Asprilla 1992–1996
1998–1999
9 (29) 0.31
5 Italy Gianfranco Zola 1993–1996 8 (30) 0.27
6 Italy Dino Baggio 1994–2001 7 (43) 0.16
7 Argentina Roberto Sensini 1994–1999
2001–2002
6 (47) 0.13
7 Italy Alessandro Melli 1985–1994
1995–1997
5 (20) 0.25
9 Italy Emiliano Bonazzoli 2000–2003 5 (12) 0.42

Top cup scorers[edit]

Name Years Goals (Apps) Gl/App
1 Italy Alessandro Melli 1985–1994
1995–1997
11[10]
2 Argentina Hernán Crespo 1996–2000
2010–2012
10 (16)[10] 0.63
3 Sweden Tomas Brolin 1990–1995
1997
8[10]
3 Colombia Faustino Asprilla 1992–1996
1998–1999
8[10]

Goalkeepers[edit]

Award winners[edit]

Oscar del Calcio[edit]

The Oscar del Calcio awards are presented in multiple categories to the best performers over the course of a Serie A season. Parma players have won five of these trophies while at the club; only five clubs have won more.

Internationals[edit]

Name Years Caps Goals
1 Alberto Di Chiara[13] 1992–1993 7 0
2 Daniele Zoratto[14] 1993 1 0
3 Antonio Benarrivo[15] 1993–1997 23 0
4 Gianfranco Zola[16] 1993–1996 23 7
5 Alessandro Melli[17] 1993 2 0
6 Lorenzo Minotti[18] 1994–1995 8 0
7 Luigi Apolloni[19] 1994–1996 15 1
8 Dino Baggio[20] 1994–1999 40 1
9 Roberto Mussi[21] 1994–1996 6 0
10 Luca Bucci[22] 1994–1995 3 0
11 Massimo Crippa[23] 1994–1996 5 1
12 Fabio Cannavaro[3][24] 1995–2002 61 0
13 Enrico Chiesa[25] 1996–1999 13 5
14 Gianluigi Buffon[26] 1997–2001 20 0
15 Diego Fuser[27] 1998–2000 11 3
16 Paolo Vanoli[28] 1999–2000 2 1
17 Marco Di Vaio[29] 2001–2002 4 0
18 Luigi Sartor[30] 2002 1 0
19 Matteo Ferrari[31] 2002–2004 11 0
20 Marco Marchionni[32] 2003–2006 2 0
21 Marcello Castellini[33] 2003 1 0
22 Simone Barone[34] 2004 1 0
23 Daniele Bonera[35] 2004–2006 8 0
24 Alberto Gilardino[36] 2004–2005 6 2
25 Daniele Galloppa[37] 2009 1 0
26 Luca Antonelli[38] 2010 2 0
27 Sebastian Giovinco[39] 2011–2012 10 0
28 Marco Parolo[40] 2013–2014 5 0
29 Gabriel Paletta[41] 2014 3 0
30 Antonio Cassano[42] 2014 4 0

Antonio Mirante has been called up to the squad, but is yet to play for the national team as a Parma player, while Fabio Cannavaro captained Italy 5 times as a Parma player.[43]

Transfers[edit]

Highest transfer fees paid[edit]

Parma's record signing is Hidetoshi Nakata, who signed for the club from Roma in 2001. It remains the highest fee paid for an Asian player in the history of the game.

Name Year Club Fee
1 Japan Hidetoshi Nakata 2001 Italy Roma €32,200,000[3]
2 Brazil Márcio Amoroso 2000 Italy Udinese €27,000,000
3 Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia Savo Milošević 2000 Spain Zaragoza €25,000,000
4 France Sébastien Frey 2001 Italy Internazionale €21,000,000
5 Argentina Juan Sebastián Verón 1998 Italy Sampdoria €17,500,000
6 Brazil Evanilson 2001 Germany Borussia Dortmund €17,000,000
6 Portugal Sérgio Conceição 2000 Italy Lazio €17,000,000
8 Brazil Adriano 2002 Italy Internazionale €12,800,000
9 Italy Alberto Gilardino 2002 Italy Verona €12,000,000
10 Bulgaria Hristo Stoichkov 1995 Spain Barcelona €11,000,000

Highest transfer fees received[edit]

The club's record sale came in the summer of 2000, when current Serie A record goalscorer Hernán Crespo moved to S.S. Lazio.

Name Year Club Fee
1 Argentina Hernán Crespo 2000 Italy Lazio €55,000,000[3]
2 Italy Gianluigi Buffon 2001 Italy Juventus €54,884,000[44]
3 France Lilian Thuram 2001 Italy Juventus €36,500,000
4 Argentina Juan Sebastián Verón 1999 Italy Lazio €30,000,000
5 Brazil Márcio Amoroso 2001 Germany Borussia Dortmund €25,000,000
5 Italy Alberto Gilardino 2005 Italy Milan €25,000,000
7 Italy Fabio Cannavaro 2002 Italy Internazionale €23,000,000
8 Argentina Matías Almeyda 2000 Italy Internazionale €22,100,000
9 Romania Adrian Mutu 2003 England Chelsea €19,000,000
10 Portugal Sérgio Conceição 2000 Italy Internazionale €18,000,000

Managerial records[edit]

  • Longest-serving manager: 7 yearsNevio Scala, 1989–1996
  • Most spells as manager: 3Pietro Carmignani, 1985 (as caretaker), 2001–2002 and 2003–2004
  • Most trophies: 4Nevio Scala, 1989–1996

Team records[edit]

Matches[edit]

  • First Coppa Italia match: Virtus Bologna 1–0 Parma, First Round, 2 April 1922
  • First Serie A match: Parma 1–2 Juventus, 9 September 1990
  • First European match: CSKA Sofia 0–0 Parma, UEFA Cup First Round, first leg, 19 September 1991

Record wins[edit]

  • Record win: 6–0 v Bordeaux, UEFA Cup Quarter-final, second leg, 16 March 1999[5]
  • Record league win:
5–0 v Cremonese, Serie B, 12 June 1932
5–0 v Perugia, Serie A, 25 February 2001[3]

Record defeats[edit]

0–5 v Juventus, 27 January 1991
0–5 v Internazionale, 7 January 2012
  • Record home Serie A defeat:[3]
0–4 v Fiorentina, 26 February 2000
0–4 v Roma, 24 September 2006

High scoring matches[edit]

  • Highest scoring Serie A match: 6–4 v Livorno, 1 May 2005

Runs[edit]

  • Longest winning run in league: 8 matches, 31 May to 25 October 1953
  • Longest winning run in Serie A: 7 matches, 11 April to 14 May 2012[45]
  • Longest unbeaten run in league: 28 matches, 3rd to 30th matchday 1968–69[46]
  • Longest unbeaten run in Serie A: 17 matches, 10 November 2013 to 23 March 2014[47]
  • Longest winning run away from home in Serie A: 5 matches, 11 January to 16 March 2014[48]
  • Longest run without victory in league: 10 matches, 4 November 2006 to 13 January 2007

Wins/draws/losses in a season[edit]

Goals[edit]

  • Most goals scored in a Serie A season: 58, 2013–14
  • Most goals conceded in a Serie A season: 65, 2004–05[3]
  • Fewest goals scored in a Serie A season: 32, 1991–92[3]
  • Fewest goals conceded in a Serie A season: 25, 1996–97[3]
  • Most individual scorers in a Serie A season: 17, 2011-12

Points[edit]

Club awards[edit]

Season-by-season performance[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Parma: Club Records". Football Italia (in Italian). football-italia.net. Retrieved 9 September 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c d e "ARCHIVIO NOTIZIE Novembre 2002" [November 2002 News Archive]. Settore Crociato Parma. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q "Parma Club Records". Football Italia. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b "Buon compleanno a Sandro Melli" [Happy birthday to Sandro Melli]. FCParma.com (Parma F.C.). 11 December 2012. Retrieved 11 December 2012. 
  5. ^ a b c "Parma". UEFA. Retrieved 2010-07-30. 
  6. ^ Campanale, Susy (27 February 2011). "Serie A: Did You Know... (Sunday 27 February, 2011)". Football Italia. www,football-italia.net. 
  7. ^ "Crespo has double objective". Football Italia (football-italia.net). 10 August 2011. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Schianchi, Roberto (14 December 1999). "Crespo re modesto: "Io capocannoniere? No, meglio lo scudetto al Parma"" [Modest Crespo: "Top scorer? No, I want the title at Parma"]. Corriere della Sera. corriere.it. Retrieved 21 August 2011. 
  9. ^ "Chi sono i bomber di sempre delle squadre di serie a ?" [Who are the Serie A teams' all-time top scorers?]. La Gazzetta dello Sport. gazzetta.it. 28 January 2006. Retrieved 4 January 2011. 
  10. ^ a b c d "Parma-Grosseto / le curiosità" [Grosseto-Parma / trivia]. Parma F.C. fcparma.com. 19 August 2011. Retrieved 19 August 2011. 
  11. ^ http://www.settorecrociatoparma.it/si-ferma-a-394-limbattibilita-di-mirante-sesta-assoluta-del-parma-in-serie-a/
  12. ^ http://www.settorecrociatoparma.it/portieri-crociati-imbattuti-in-trasferta-in-a-mirante-con-319-ha-battuto-il-record-del-maestro-bucci-315/
  13. ^ "Parma all-time XI". Football Italia. Retrieved 12 December 2010. 
  14. ^ "Daniele Zoratto". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 25 May 2011. 
  15. ^ "Antonio Benarrivo". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  16. ^ "Gianfranco Zola". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  17. ^ "Alessandro Melli". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  18. ^ "Lorenzo Minotti". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  19. ^ "Luigi Apolloni". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  20. ^ "Dino Baggio". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  21. ^ "Roberto Mussi". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  22. ^ "Luca Bucci". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  23. ^ "Massimo Crippa". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  24. ^ "Fabio Cannavaro". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  25. ^ "Enrico Chiesa". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  26. ^ "Gianluigi Buffon". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  27. ^ "Diego Fuser". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  28. ^ "Paolo Vanoli". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  29. ^ "Marco Di Vaio". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  30. ^ "Luigi Sartor". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  31. ^ "Matteo Ferrari". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  32. ^ "Marco Marchionni". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  33. ^ "Marcello Castellini". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  34. ^ "Simone Barone". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  35. ^ "Daniele Bonera". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  36. ^ "Alberto Gilardino". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  37. ^ "Daniele Galloppa". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  38. ^ "Luca Antonelli". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 December 2010. 
  39. ^ "Sebastian Giovinco". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 9 October 2011. 
  40. ^ "Marco Parolo". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 18 January 2014. 
  41. ^ "Gabriel Paletta". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 5 March 2014. 
  42. ^ "Antonio Cassano". FIGC (in Italian). figc.it. Retrieved 3 June 2014. 
  43. ^ "Profile lists of all the Clubs starting with the letters N, O, P and Q that gave players to the Italian National team". Forza Azzurri. Retrieved 1 January 2012. 
  44. ^ "Relazione Finanziaria semestrale 31 12 2010" [Financial Report 31 12 2010]. Juventus F.C. 
  45. ^ Salsano, Francesco (13 May 2012). "Parma, settima da record" [Parma, record seventh]. La Gazzetta dello Sport (in Italian) (RCS MediaGroup). 
  46. ^ "Diciassette: sono i risultati utili consecutivi del Parma" [Seventeen: the number of unbeaten matches for Parma]. April 2014. 
  47. ^ "Donadoni: 'Proud of Parma'". Football-Italia.net (Football Italia). 26 March 2014. 
  48. ^ "Sassuolo-Parma 0-1, i crociati sbancano anche Reggio Emilia. E' un'altra vittoria che vale la storia" [Sassuolo-Parma 0-1: the Crociati plunder Reggio Emilia too, another history-making victory] (in Italian). 2 March 2014.