Partenavia Fachiro

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P.57 Fachiro
Partenavia P57 Fachiro Milan Bresso 07.65 edited-2.jpg
P57 Fachiro IIf at Milan's Bresso airport in 1965
Role Four-seat touring monoplane
National origin Italy
Manufacturer Partenavia
First flight 1958
Introduction 1959
Status examples still flying
Primary user aero clubs and private pilot owners
Number built 37[1]

The Partenavia P.57 Fachiro is an Italian four-seat high-wing touring monoplane fitted with a fixed tricycle undercarriage.

Design and development[edit]

The P.57 was designed and built by Partenavia. The Lycoming O-320 powered Fachiro I first flew on the 7 November 1958 followed by the Fachiro II on the 3 January 1959. A later version, designated the II-f, introduced a swept fin and rudder.

The Fachiro utilised mixed steel tube-and-fabric construction and was fitted with a 160 hp (119 kW) engine for aero club and general aviation use.[2]

A one-off all-metal version, the P.64 Fachiro III, was further developed as the P.64 Oscar.

Seven examples of the Fachiro IIf version remained in operation within Italy during spring 2009.[3]

Variants[edit]

P.57 Fachiro I
Powered by a 150 hp (112 kW) Lycoming O-320 engine.
P.57 Fachiro II
Powered by a 168 hp (125 kW)) Lycoming O-360-B2A engine. 3 built.
P.57 Fachiro II-f
Powered by a 180 hp (134 kW) Lycoming O-320-A2A engine. 33 built.
P.64 Fachiro III
An all-metal version developed as the P.64 Oscar 1 built.

Specifications (Fachiro II)[edit]

Data from ,[4] Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965-66[5]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 3 passengers
  • Length: 6.625 m (21 ft 9 in)
  • Wingspan: 9.14 m (30 ft 0 in)
  • Height: 2.41 m (7 ft 11 in)
  • Wing area: 13.40 m2 (144.2 ft2)
  • Empty weight: 645 kg (1,420 lb)
  • Gross weight: 1,150 kg (2,420 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-360-A2A, 134 kW (180 hp)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 240 km/h (149 mph)
  • Cruising speed: 190 km/h (118 mph)
  • Range: 900 km (560 miles)
  • Service ceiling: 4,200 m (13,780 ft)
  • Rate of climb: 5.0 m/s (985 ft/min)

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

  1. ^ Simpson, 2005, p. 214
  2. ^ Simpson, 2005, P.212
  3. ^ Partington, 2009, pp. 315-326
  4. ^ Orbis 1985, page 2692
  5. ^ Taylor 1965, pp. 96–97.
  • Partington, Dave (2009). European Registers Handbook 2009. Air-Britain (Historians) Ltd. ISBN 978-0-85130-417-5. 
  • Simpson, Rod (2005). The General Aviation Handbook. Midland Publishing. ISBN 1-85780-222-5. 
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1965). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1965-66. London: Samson Low, Marston. 
  • Taylor, Michael J. H. (1989). Jane's Encyclopaedia of Aviation. London: Studio Editions. 
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.