Partenavia Aeroscooter

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P.53 Aeroscooter
Role Experimental hybrid monoplane
National origin Italy
Manufacturer Partenavia
Designer Mario de Bernardi
First flight 2 April 1951
Status On display
Number built 1
Variants de Bernardi M.d.B. 02 Aeroscooter

The Partenavia P.53 Aeroscooter was a 1950s Italian single-seat light aircraft fitted with a two-bladed rotor. It was designed by Mario de Bernardi and built by Partenavia.[1]

Design and development[edit]

The Aeroscooter was low-wing monoplane powered by a 22 hp (16 kW) Ambrosini P-25 piston engine in the nose.[1] It had a fixed nose-wheel landing gear.[1] Above the enclosed single-seat cockpit a pylon was to have been fitted with an autorotating, unpowered two-bladed rotor which was to reduce the stalling speed and the rate-of-descent if the engine failed.[1]

Only one Aeroscooter was built and it first flew on 2 April 1951 without the rotor fitted.[1] The Aeroscooter survives and is on display at the Museo Storico Dell Aeronautico Militare Italiana. A two seat derivative was produced by Mario de Baernardi as the de Bernardi M.d.B. 02 Aeroscooter.

Variants[edit]

Specifications (Ambrosini engine, no rotor)[edit]

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1957-58[3]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: 1
  • Length: 5.12 m (16 ft 10 in)
  • Wingspan: 8.28 m (27 ft 2 in)
  • Height: 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in)
  • Wing area: 8.3 m2 (89 sq ft)
  • Airfoil: NACA 63-series
  • Empty weight: 180 kg (397 lb)
  • Gross weight: 280 kg (617 lb)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Ambrosini P-25 , 16 kW (22 hp)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 150 km/h (93 mph; 81 kn) at sea level
  • Cruising speed: 120 km/h (75 mph; 65 kn)
  • Stall speed: 60 km/h (37 mph; 32 kn)
  • Range: 500 km (311 mi; 270 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 3,500 m (11,483 ft)
  • Wing loading: 33.7 kg/m2 (6.9 lb/sq ft)

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Orbis 1985, p. 2680
  2. ^ Sport Aviation. June 1960. 
  3. ^ Jane's 1957

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. 
  • Bridgman, Leonard (1957). Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1957-58. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Co. Ltd. p. 189-90.