Parthamasiris of Armenia

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Parthamasiris, also known as Partamasir or Parthomasiris[1] (flourished second half of the 1st century & first half of the 2nd century, died 114) was a Parthian Prince who served as a Roman Client King of Armenia.

Parthamasiris was one of the three sons born to the King Pacorus II of Parthia[2] by an unnamed mother. Through his father he was a member of the House of Parthia thus a relation of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia.[3] Little is known on his life prior to becoming Armenian King.

In 113, Parthamasiris’ paternal uncle Osroes I of Parthia deposed his brother Axidares from the Armenian Kingship and installed him as the Armenian King to avoid to going to war with the Roman emperor Trajan and keep peace with him.[4][5] Axidares was placed on the Armenian throne by his paternal uncle without Roman consultation[6] which led to Trajan to view the action by Osroes I as an invitation to war with Parthia.[7]

When Trajan with his army had advanced to Parthia, the Roman emperor received Parthamasiris. Parthamasiris hoped he could retain his Armenian Kingship, however was rejected after Trajan had listen to him and declined his requested to keep his Kingship.[8] After rejecting Parthamasiris’ request, Trajan annexed Armenia as a Roman Province.[9]

Trajan sent Parthamasiris from Armenia back home to Parthia and Trajan continued on with his Parthian military campaign.[10] On his way home to Parthia, Parthamasiris disappeared mysteriously,[11] perhaps on Trajan’s orders had Parthamasiris killed.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Mommsen, The provinces of the Roman Empire: from Caesar to Domitian, p.66
  2. ^ Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, p.151
  3. ^ Farrokh, Shadows in the Desert: Ancient Persia at War, p.p.159-8
  4. ^ Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, p.p.150&151
  5. ^ Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, p.87
  6. ^ Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, p.87
  7. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.303
  8. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.313
  9. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.313
  10. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.313
  11. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.313
  12. ^ Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, p.88

Sources[edit]

  • D.T. Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, Museum Tusculanum Press, 1988
  • Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, Cambridge University Press, 1993
  • M. Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, Oxford University Press, 1995
  • T. Mommsen, W. Purdie Dickson & F. Haverfield, The provinces of the Roman Empire: from Caesar to Domitian, Gorgias Press LLC, 2004
  • K. Farrokh, Shadows in the Desert: Ancient Persia at War, Osprey Publishing, 2007