Partition Treaty on the Status and Conditions of the Black Sea Fleet

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Partition Treaty on the Black Sea Fleet
Partition Treaty on the Status and Conditions of the Black Sea Fleet
Signed May 28, 1997; 17 years ago (1997-05-28)
Effective July 12, 1999; 15 years ago (1999-07-12)
Signatories
Languages Russian, Ukrainian[1]
Partition Treaty on the Status and Conditions of the Black Sea Fleet at Wikisource

The Partition Treaty on the Status and Conditions of the Black Sea Fleet was a treaty signed between Russia and Ukraine on 28 May 1997 whereby the two countries established two independent national fleets, and divided armaments and bases between them.[2][3] Under the treaty, the Black Sea Fleet that was located in the Crimean peninsula at the time, was partitioned between Russia (81.7%) and Ukraine (18.3%), with Russia maintaining the right to use the Port of Sevastopol in Ukraine for 20 years until 2017.[4] The treaty also allowed Russia to maintain up to 25,000 troops, 24 artillery systems, 132 armored vehicles, and 22 military planes on the Crimean peninsula.

On 28 March 2014, amidst the 2014 Crimean crisis and one week after the (disputed) accession of Crimea to the Russian Federation (including the city of Sevastopol),[5] Russian President Vladimir Putin submitted proposals to the State Duma on terminating the legal effect of number of Russia-Ukraine agreements including denouncing the Partition Treaty on the Status and Conditions of the Black Sea Fleet and the 2010 Kharkiv Pact treaty.[6] The State Duma approved the denunciation of these Russian-Ukrainian agreements unanimously by 433 members of parliament on 31 March 2014.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Russian: Соглашение между Российской Федерацией и Украиной о статусе и условиях пребывания Черноморского флота Российской Федерации на территории Украины; Ukrainian: Угода між Україною і Російською Федерацією про статус та умови перебування Чорноморського флоту Російської Федерації на території України
  2. ^ "UK's response to the situation in Ukraine - Oral statements to Parliament". GOV.UK. Retrieved 2014-03-07. 
  3. ^ Subtelny, Orest (2000). Ukraine: A History. University of Toronto Press. p. 600. ISBN 0-8020-8390-0. 
  4. ^ Brownlie's Principles of Public International Law, p. 431 ISBN 9780199699698
  5. ^ Ukraine: Speaker Oleksandr Turchynov named interim president, BBC News (23 February 2014)
    Ukraine protests timeline, BBC News (23 February 2014)
  6. ^ Putin submits proposals on denouncing some Russia-Ukraine agreements on Black Sea Fleet, ITAR-TASS (29 March 2014)
  7. ^ State Duma approves denunciation of Russian-Ukrainian agreements on Black Sea Fleet, ITAR-TASS (31 March 2014)

External links[edit]